Monthly Archive for: ‘December, 2017’

Plan Ahead, They Are Counting on You!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

10 Days Left, Blaze and Quinn!

Quinn & Blaze came to AAE when their family was preparing to downsize.  Another frequent reason horses end up at rescue is their family is moving and they can’t take their horse(s).  More often than not, people don’t realize how difficult it can be placing horses, especially older horses.  When the time comes to go, they have no place to go.  

Fortunately, Quinn and Blaze’s family was planning ahead, and when space became available, AAE was able to help, which is often not the case.  

Quinn and Blaze are looking for a new family to call their own.

Quinn is a very fancy 23 year old half Arab (registered) and half Saddlebred mare. Quinn tends to be higher energy and a bit impatient. Quinn was trained English and Western in the distant past, and she has been used in the arena and on trail.  However, she has not been ridden for about 5 years.  She was forward on trail, loved to go!  Quinn is a bit more complicated and needs at least an intermediate handler/rider.  She’s not always compatible with other horses, and is known to kick out at other horses when under saddle.  She has had a mild injury to her front right, but was lightly rideable in the past.  She was recently evaluated and okay’d for light riding. 

 

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Consider the Effort and the Impact

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

11 Days Left, Smokey, Tilly, Mazie and Hildago!

Today’s story includes several horses, previously rescued, and they fell back on AAE this year as a sort of a safety net.   Too many times, people adopt a horse, and for one reason or another, and they are unable to keep the horse.  That’s how many end up here to begin with.

One of our disappointments in recent years is that AAE’s failed adoption rate has grown to about 10 percent.  Though AAE strives to match horses with forever homes, sometimes the situation is beyond anyone’s control.  Other times, it seems people far underestimate the effort, responsibility, commitment, and cost of horse ownership.  Sometimes the adopter overestimates or overstates his/her abilities, resulting in a mis-matched adoption.  Sadly, these things happen far more often than they should.

 

Continue Reading

WE DID IT – 7 MORE LIVES SAVED! MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM CHILLY PEPPER!

0

The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

MERRY CHRISTMAS from Chilly Pepper.

We did it, we saved the 7 (2 minis and 5 ponies) from slaughter. This took awhile, but all came home safely. Great news is that two of them have already been adopted.

This group was by far our most expensive, but we had to save them. THANK YOU EVERYONE who stepped up to make it happen. The “tiny’s” would have been slaughtered for dog food or their hides. So they say THANK YOU!

At this point we have 23 horses on the property. Four of the older ones have special feed requirements . One of the 20 year olds need his teeth floated as he looks like he is starving :( But he will get those fixed soon and he is on special feed and doing well so far. We need to get a couple stallions gelded so they can be adopted. There are 9 total up for adoption. Most of our permanent residents have either health issues or are special needs for a variety of other reasons.

Continue Reading

He Caught Her Heart and Changed Their Lives!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

 12 Days Left, Legend and Jackson!

Last January, AAE learned of a call for help with 20 some horses that had been removed from the range in Nevada.  These were Virginia Range wild horses that were removed by the Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDOA).  The NDOA manages the horses that are on state lands.

In short, the NDOA has authority to remove horses that present a clear and continuing danger to motorists after failed relocation attempts.  Sadly, this group of horses had crossed the highway too many times and presented a threat to motorists.  The Virginia Range Sanctuary (VRS) works tirelessly to protect and advocated for the wild horses, and when they are removed, this amazing group works diligently to place the horses in forever homes.  When forever homes can’t be found, they look to other organizations to continue their work.

In January, one of our volunteers, Pam, reached out to VRS with interest in one of the horses that had been removed.  At the time, we were still hoping to help the Hallelujah Horses, but winter weather and the transport situation was not cooperating.  Since we hadn’t made progress in that situation, we refocused to a more local need.  Before you know it, we committed to four Virginia Range Horses that became five:  Onyx, Whisper, Annie, Legend and Jackson.  Today, we focus on Legend and Jackson.

 

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IMG 8391

What’s New with Roll? Cyst Removal

2

12/22/17

Today, Chad brought Roll up to the work station. On October 23, 2017, I had found a nodule on Roll’s lower right jaw line. Our veterinarian, Greg Farrand came out right away to check it to determine what kind of growth it was.

We have had sarcoids in the past, but this did not seem to be a sarcoid, but rather, a small cyst that was not attached to the bone. Since it was not attached, I made the decision to get it removed before it had an opportunity to become attached to the bone.

Lucky Three Sundowner had a similar growth on his jaw that WAS attached to the bone and it finally grew to such a size that it ultimately obstructed his ability to eat and he had to be put down at the age of 35 years.

We were preparing to vaccinate the herd, so we opted to wait on Roll’s surgery until after the vaccinations and hoped for a freeze that would kill all the insects. The exposed wound would have a better chance at healing in the colder weather without insect interference. We had to wait for quite a while since our winter weather proved to be unusually warm until today,  December 22, when we finally opted to do the surgery.

 

Greg gave Roll a sedative to help him to relax. I shaved the area heavily covered with winter hair with my #10 blades and then Greg stepped in and shaved it closer with his veterinary-gauged blades.

He then injected the site with a numbing agent and prepped it for the surgery.

The cyst was neatly contained and unattached below the surface of the skin. He carefully cut it away from the skin and was left with a perfectly round cyst that fell out easily.

When cut in half, the cyst revealed granular tissue in the center that is indicative of some foreign agent in the body that was surrounded by tissue that just never abscessed. We will send off the cyst to be tested to make sure there are no further issues to treat.

Greg carefully and neatly sutured the skin along his jaw line back together.

Greg gave me instructions about the care of the wound. Basically, we did not have to do anything, but let it heal. I will remove the sutures in 10-14 days.

Roll was still a bit drowsy when I took him back to his pen. He will not get food for at least two hours after the surgery to keep him from choking. He should heal nicely.

I took a sleepy Roll back to his pen. By tomorrow, he probably won’t even know what happened and he was such a trooper through it all! I am so glad my mules are trained the way they are…not a bit of trouble!

 

Donkeys Require a Creative Approach

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No portfolio posts were found for the category selected.

Plan Ahead, They Are Counting on You!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

10 Days Left, Blaze and Quinn!

Quinn & Blaze came to AAE when their family was preparing to downsize.  Another frequent reason horses end up at rescue is their family is moving and they can’t take their horse(s).  More often than not, people don’t realize how difficult it can be placing horses, especially older horses.  When the time comes to go, they have no place to go.  

Fortunately, Quinn and Blaze’s family was planning ahead, and when space became available, AAE was able to help, which is often not the case.  

Quinn and Blaze are looking for a new family to call their own.

Quinn is a very fancy 23 year old half Arab (registered) and half Saddlebred mare. Quinn tends to be higher energy and a bit impatient. Quinn was trained English and Western in the distant past, and she has been used in the arena and on trail.  However, she has not been ridden for about 5 years.  She was forward on trail, loved to go!  Quinn is a bit more complicated and needs at least an intermediate handler/rider.  She’s not always compatible with other horses, and is known to kick out at other horses when under saddle.  She has had a mild injury to her front right, but was lightly rideable in the past.  She was recently evaluated and okay’d for light riding. 

 

Continue Reading

Consider the Effort and the Impact

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

11 Days Left, Smokey, Tilly, Mazie and Hildago!

Today’s story includes several horses, previously rescued, and they fell back on AAE this year as a sort of a safety net.   Too many times, people adopt a horse, and for one reason or another, and they are unable to keep the horse.  That’s how many end up here to begin with.

One of our disappointments in recent years is that AAE’s failed adoption rate has grown to about 10 percent.  Though AAE strives to match horses with forever homes, sometimes the situation is beyond anyone’s control.  Other times, it seems people far underestimate the effort, responsibility, commitment, and cost of horse ownership.  Sometimes the adopter overestimates or overstates his/her abilities, resulting in a mis-matched adoption.  Sadly, these things happen far more often than they should.

 

Continue Reading

WE DID IT – 7 MORE LIVES SAVED! MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM CHILLY PEPPER!

0

The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

MERRY CHRISTMAS from Chilly Pepper.

We did it, we saved the 7 (2 minis and 5 ponies) from slaughter. This took awhile, but all came home safely. Great news is that two of them have already been adopted.

This group was by far our most expensive, but we had to save them. THANK YOU EVERYONE who stepped up to make it happen. The “tiny’s” would have been slaughtered for dog food or their hides. So they say THANK YOU!

At this point we have 23 horses on the property. Four of the older ones have special feed requirements . One of the 20 year olds need his teeth floated as he looks like he is starving :( But he will get those fixed soon and he is on special feed and doing well so far. We need to get a couple stallions gelded so they can be adopted. There are 9 total up for adoption. Most of our permanent residents have either health issues or are special needs for a variety of other reasons.

Continue Reading

He Caught Her Heart and Changed Their Lives!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

 12 Days Left, Legend and Jackson!

Last January, AAE learned of a call for help with 20 some horses that had been removed from the range in Nevada.  These were Virginia Range wild horses that were removed by the Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDOA).  The NDOA manages the horses that are on state lands.

In short, the NDOA has authority to remove horses that present a clear and continuing danger to motorists after failed relocation attempts.  Sadly, this group of horses had crossed the highway too many times and presented a threat to motorists.  The Virginia Range Sanctuary (VRS) works tirelessly to protect and advocated for the wild horses, and when they are removed, this amazing group works diligently to place the horses in forever homes.  When forever homes can’t be found, they look to other organizations to continue their work.

In January, one of our volunteers, Pam, reached out to VRS with interest in one of the horses that had been removed.  At the time, we were still hoping to help the Hallelujah Horses, but winter weather and the transport situation was not cooperating.  Since we hadn’t made progress in that situation, we refocused to a more local need.  Before you know it, we committed to four Virginia Range Horses that became five:  Onyx, Whisper, Annie, Legend and Jackson.  Today, we focus on Legend and Jackson.

 

Continue Reading
IMG 8391

What’s New with Roll? Cyst Removal

2

12/22/17

Today, Chad brought Roll up to the work station. On October 23, 2017, I had found a nodule on Roll’s lower right jaw line. Our veterinarian, Greg Farrand came out right away to check it to determine what kind of growth it was.

We have had sarcoids in the past, but this did not seem to be a sarcoid, but rather, a small cyst that was not attached to the bone. Since it was not attached, I made the decision to get it removed before it had an opportunity to become attached to the bone.

Lucky Three Sundowner had a similar growth on his jaw that WAS attached to the bone and it finally grew to such a size that it ultimately obstructed his ability to eat and he had to be put down at the age of 35 years.

We were preparing to vaccinate the herd, so we opted to wait on Roll’s surgery until after the vaccinations and hoped for a freeze that would kill all the insects. The exposed wound would have a better chance at healing in the colder weather without insect interference. We had to wait for quite a while since our winter weather proved to be unusually warm until today,  December 22, when we finally opted to do the surgery.

 

Greg gave Roll a sedative to help him to relax. I shaved the area heavily covered with winter hair with my #10 blades and then Greg stepped in and shaved it closer with his veterinary-gauged blades.

He then injected the site with a numbing agent and prepped it for the surgery.

The cyst was neatly contained and unattached below the surface of the skin. He carefully cut it away from the skin and was left with a perfectly round cyst that fell out easily.

When cut in half, the cyst revealed granular tissue in the center that is indicative of some foreign agent in the body that was surrounded by tissue that just never abscessed. We will send off the cyst to be tested to make sure there are no further issues to treat.

Greg carefully and neatly sutured the skin along his jaw line back together.

Greg gave me instructions about the care of the wound. Basically, we did not have to do anything, but let it heal. I will remove the sutures in 10-14 days.

Roll was still a bit drowsy when I took him back to his pen. He will not get food for at least two hours after the surgery to keep him from choking. He should heal nicely.

I took a sleepy Roll back to his pen. By tomorrow, he probably won’t even know what happened and he was such a trooper through it all! I am so glad my mules are trained the way they are…not a bit of trouble!

 

Donkeys Require a Creative Approach

0
No portfolio posts were found for the category selected.

Landmark Tax Bill Crosses the Finish Line

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The following is from the American Horse Council:

Landmark Tax Bill Crosses the Finish Line

The Senate hustled early Wednesday morning, December 20 to pass the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 by a vote of 51-48.  Although the House passed the bill Tuesday afternoon, congressional budget rules required the Senate to return the bill to the House for a revote on Wednesday to address technical changes.  While details related to the 1100-page conference report on the final legislation continue to emerge, please see the below highlights that will have the most direct impact on the horse industry:

Business Provisions

  • Corporate Taxes :  The new tax law reduces the corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21% and takes effect January 1.  AHC members filing as “C corporations,” which are generally identified by the suffix, “Inc.,” will see an immediate reduction in their official, or statutory tax rate.  AHC members filing as “C corporations” would include racetracks, makers of pharmaceuticals and agricultural equipment, and large breeding operations governed by officers and a board of directors, among others.  While many policy experts believe that the new tax code will be easier to navigate from a business perspective, corporate taxpayers’ effective liability will vary to the extent they are able to utilize the new code’s remaining deductions, some of which are outlined below.
  • Small Business, “Pass-Through” Deduction :  The Tax Cut and Jobs Act establishes a 20% deduction for the first $315,000 of joint income, or $157,500 for individual filers, from “pass-through” entities such as partnerships, sole proprietorships and S corporations.  This new provision could benefit small businesses that generally report incomes at or near the new threshold level.  While various types of “pass-throughs” constitute the fastest growing segment of AHC members, they also include the majority of U.S. farms.  According to Department of Agriculture data, 85% of domestic agriculture production comes from “pass through” entities.
  • Bonus Depreciation of Equipment: The House and Senate conference report includes 100% bonus depreciation – an increase from the current 50% rate – through  December 31, 2022, for property placed in service after September 27, 2017.  Beginning in 2023, bonus depreciation is reduced from 100%, to 80% in 2024, then falls by 20% increments each year through 2026.  Farm equipment used in a business operation, breeding stock and according to a preliminary reviews of the final language, race horses will benefit from the robust deduction.
  • Losses at the Racetracks :  The final law preserves the deduction of losses “sustained … on wagering transactions to the extent of the gains” realized “during the taxable year.”  However, the law clarifies that the “limitation on losses from wagering transactions applies not only to the actual costs of the wages, but to other expenses incurred by the individual in connection with the conduct of that individual’s gambling activity.”  For example, the law subjects the deduction for travel expenses to and from a racetrack to the cap established by the amount of the gains.  Like many of the deductions in the bill, the provision sunsets after 2025.
  • Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) – The new law repeals the corporate AMT, ending the need to calculate tax liability twice for a single filing.
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We Started with 4 and Baby Made 5!!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

13 Days Left, Onyx, Whisper and Annie!

Last January, AAE learned of a call for help with 20 some horses that had been removed from the range in Nevada.  These were Virginia Range wild horses that were removed by the Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDOA).  The NDOA manages the horses that are on state lands.

In short, the NDOA has authority to remove horses that present a clear and continuing danger to motorists after failed relocation attempts.  Sadly, this group of horses had crossed the highway too many times and presented a threat to motorists.  The Virginia Range Sanctuary (VRS) works tirelessly to protect and advocated for the wild horses, and when they are removed, this amazing group works diligently to place the horses in forever homes.  When forever homes can’t be found, they look to other organizations to continue their work.

 

Continue Reading

Sometimes Good Things Take Time

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

14 Days Left, Lilly!

Sometimes good things take time.  AAE is committed to providing sanctuary to all horses we take in until a forever home can be found.  Like fine wine, Lilly’s adoption took time.  Lilly had been at AAE longer than any non-program horse.  She was one of the 2011 November Rescue Miracle horses rescued from the Nevada feedlot by Stinkin’ Rose Ranch.  She came to AAE in March 2012.

Lilly was untouchable and extremely fearful upon arrival.

 

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The difference you make

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Photograph by Linda Hay

There’s one thing standing between our opponents getting their way and ushering in a new policy to slaughter America’s wild horses: you.

This was our organization’s most challenging year ever. But, thanks to you, we overwhelmingly succeeded.

From legal and Senate wins, to education and advocacy milestones, to holding BLM accountable for its inhumane roundups, we’ve been fighting back against all the dangers wild horses and burros face. Our opponents may have the power and money. But we’ve always had the people on our side.                                                        

Here are just a few of our 2017 successes:

  • Convinced Senate to stand against slaughter. We fought the Interior Department’s request to slaughter nearly 100,00 of America’s wild horses with everything we had. Together, we led a massive grassroots, advocacy, and paid media campaign. It paid off in November when the Senate maintained prohibitions on killing and slaughter. The fight’s not over, but the Senate’s position is a major victory for our side.
  • Litigated to stop destruction of wild herds and removal of habitat. We scored major victories in federal court that stopped the BLM from destroying an entire wild horse population in Idaho by sterilizing every member of the herd, and from turning over wild horse habitat in California to private livestock interests.
  • Vaccinated more mares with birth control than the BLM did. Our volunteer team on Nevada’s Virginia Range darted more horses with humane birth control this year than the entire BLM did in 2016!
  • Mobilized 300,000 citizens. We delivered over 300,000 signatures to key Congressional offices in Reno, Phoenix and Las Vegas and to a National BLM Advisory Board meeting in Colorado, urging support for humane management methods for wild horses and burros.
  • Educated the public about federal cruelty to wild horses & burros. We showed the world what our government is doing to our mustangs in the remote areas of the West where wild horses live. Our high quality video footage of BLM helicopter roundups was seen by millions on social media, raising significant public awareness about our government’s inhumane treatment of wild horses and burros.

That’s only a small glimpse of the work we’ve done. I am so proud of our excellent team and the hard work they put in this year. But most of all, I am so very grateful for you: your dedication, your support, and your actions. You are the backbone of what we do.

From all of us here, and on behalf of the magnificent wild horses and burros we are fighting so hard to save, thank you.

Sincerely,
Suzanne Roy

PS. Want to help us make even more of an impact of 2018? Pitch in now to support our year-end fundraising efforts and fuel all of our vital work to protect wild horses and burros and meet the challenges of the year ahead.

Donate

Confused About the ELD Mandate? We Can Help.

0

 

 

The following is from the American Horse Council:

Confused About the ELD Mandate? We Can Help.

On November 30th , the AHC sent out a Washington Update to our members on our efforts to address the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate. The AHC, in collaboration with the rest of the animal agriculture community, has requested that the Department of Transportation (DOT) grant a one-year enforcement delay followed by a waiver and limited exemptions from compliance with the December 18, 2017 implementation date for the Final Rule on Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) and Hours of Service (HOS). Additionally, we requested that the DOT address the significant problems with the mandate that will occur if the compliance deadline is not extended. The welfare, safety, and health of the animals in transit, together with the safety of other drivers on the road, are top priorities for the equine industry and its enthusiasts.

The introduction of the ELD mandate has also brought to light concerns about Commercial Driver’s license (CDL) requirements from the entire equine community. Drivers have been required to have a CDL in order to drive certain commercial motor vehicles (CMV’s) since April 1, 1992. That being said, a truck and trailer can be considered a commercial vehicle without the requirement that you obtain a CDL. The AHC would like to note that the requirements for a CDL or CMV classification have been in effect for quite some time, and are not new developments along with the ELD mandate.

In an effort to help provide some clarity for both our members and the general equine industry, the AHC has put together two brochures: “Electronic Logging Device Mandate: How Will It Affect You?” and “Commercial Driver’s License: How do I Know if I Need One?” Both are available as a .pdf on the AHC’s website here:http://www.horsecouncil.org/eld-mandate-cdl-requirements/

We encourage our members to share this information, and please contact the AHC if you have any additional questions.

Read on AHC Website

 

Remembering a Gentle Giant!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

 15 Days Left, Angus the Gentle Giant!

Remembering Angus!  He was a big, enormously handsome, genuinely kind, 21-ish Shire gelding. He introduced our volunteers and guests to the true gentleness of these giant horses.
He crossed the Rainbow Bridge this year, and he has been missed a ton.

 

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Meet our Majestic Mustang

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

16 Days Left, Bentley!


Bentley is one of the Hallelujah Horses.  He’s so special, he needed a day of his own.  Bentley was the most pathetic looking when the boys arrived, but at the same time, the most majestic.

 

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A Call to Action Led Us to These Six!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

 17 Days Left, The Hallelujah Horses!

In October 2016, 907 mustangs were seized by authorities from International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros in South Dakota. Fleet of Angels stepped in to take responsibility for what is now known as the largest horse rescue mission in the US.

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UHC Roundup – December 2017

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The following is from UHC:

The UHC Roundup

DECEMBER 2017​
The UHC Roundup is an online publication that compiles news articles and events related to unwanted horses. It highlights UHC member programs and success stories spanning all breeds, disciplines, and regions.I
f you wish to share your story of unwanted horses becoming wanted again, contact the UHC at afurst@horsecouncil.org.
UHC NEWS
Happy Holidays from the Unwanted Horse Coalition!​The UHC would like to wish everyone a very Happy Holiday and a wonderful New Year! Thank you for your past and continued support of the UHC. We are looking forward to 2018 with some new and exciting initiatives in the works!Read More

Feature Photo“The UHC has helped us with five mini stallions, which is amazing! Sadly, many of the minis that enter the action pipeline are studs, I guess because owners don’t want to spend the money, and the little ones are easy, even as stallions.”
Program Highlight

Somehow, through the flames, smoke, chaos and tears, an army of heroes emerged in California. Some were burned, some bruised, but all were relentless in aiding the struggling people and horses of the San Luis Rey Downs Fire.

Success Story

It was just another ordinary Tuesday in 2001 for Janet Rowe, owner of Saving Grace Equine Rescue in Bracebridge, Ontario. She was making one of her frequent trips to the Ontario Livestock Exchange in St. Jacobs, Ontario, to look for another horse in need to rescue, rehab and re-home.

 

Click to Read the UHC December Roundup in its Entirety

Operation Gelding Updates

2,330 stallions gelded
$152,275 in funding provided
186 gelding clinics supported
Clinics offered in 33 states
306 vouchers distributed
UPCOMING CLINICS
January 13, 2018
Hope in the Valley Equine Rescue, North Wichita, KS
January 17, 22, 24, 2018
KSU College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
January 27, 2018
Edisto Equine Clinic, Yonges Island, SC
April 11, 2018
VA-MD College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA
April 28, 2018
Horse Haven of Tennessee/University of Tennessee Vet Med, Lancing, TN

Click HERE to see full list of clinics.

The Countdown Continues with A Wild One

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

 18 Days Left, Diego!
 Handsome Diego was originally part of a group of mustangs gathered by the USFS in New Mexico off the Jarita Mesa Wild Horse Territory in the El Rito Ranger District of the Carson National Forest.
After being offered for adoption by the USFS at two adoption events, he was not lucky enough to be chosen.
Diego, along with herdmates Scout, Diesel and several others, were taken to the Monty Roberts International Learning Center (MRILC) in Solvang, CA.

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Nevada to Give Away Virginia Range Mustangs – Please Help!

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Nevada’s beloved Virginia Range mustangs are in grave danger.

On Tuesday, the Nevada Board of Agriculture voted to direct the Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDA) to transfer ownership of the estimated 3,000 Virginia Range horses to a private entity. The new “owner” would then have private “property rights” entitling them to do whatever they want with the horses, including send them to slaughter.

The Board’s vote defied the will of the public and business community, which turned out in force to oppose this dangerous giveaway. The only comment in favor of the plan was made “Protect the Harvest,” an organization whose top priority is legalizing the slaughter of America’s horses and burros.

For years, AWHC has worked to protect the Virginia Range horses. Through Cooperative Agreements with the State, we implemented the world’s largest humane birth control program and rescued over 240 horses from slaughter. Then on October 25, the NDA abruptly cancelled these agreements.

It’s clear that the good-old-boy cattlemen’s network is taking advantage of the horses’ legal vulnerability (the horses are not protected under federal law) to push their agenda of mustang roundup and slaughter.

We can’t – and won’t – let this stand. While we explore legal and political avenues to challenge this action, we need you to contact Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval – he has power to reverse his administration’s decision that jeopardizes the future of this historic herd.

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Sometimes You Have to Say Good-Bye!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

19 Days Left, Banjo!
Banjo, we said goodbye to another long timer at AAE

Banjo was relinquished by his owner in January 2014 after his owner developed health issues. He shared a pasture with another horse for 12 years, and he was very protective of his pasture-mate, much to his detriment.

Banjo had a very sweet side, but he also tested his handler, and displayed some naughty stud-like behavior. He was fearful of ropes, and he would challenged his handler when approached with one. We were told he was used as a child’s riding horse (hard to imagine) 12 years prior.

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From No Future to Forever Loved! Your Support Made a Difference!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

20 Days Left, Maci

Maci arrived at All About Equine Animal Rescue, Inc. on September 4th, 2015.  She was one of four horses that came to AAE as part of a collaborative rescue effort in Fallon, NV that saved 56 horses at auction from purchase by a slaughter buyer.  Maci was a two year old, and the rest of the foursome included two yearlings, Bailey and Mazie, and Jolene, an older, experienced mare.  Maci, Bailey, and Mazie were not halterable when they arrived.

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Can we make it 11?

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Let’s Deck the Stalls with Boughs of Plenty for 2018

21 Days Left, Gentry and Foley

Last, but not least, AAE welcomed Gentry, a pretty young mare, and Foley, her little “red” colt from the DreamCatcher Wild Horse and Burro Sanctuary in September 2017. These are the last two, which made 13 horses helped from the DreamCatcher gang.  Nine have been adopted so far.  Can we make it 11?

Gentry had only recently been introduced to humans when she arrived, so she was a bit shy and unsure about the new humans that were caring for her. She is learning humans are not so scary, and she knows they’re the ones with the good stuff (food).  She always waits patiently at feeding time.

Upon dental exam, we learned she is only about 2-1/2 years old.
A baby with a baby, but she is such a good mama.

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