Monthly Archive for: ‘May, 2020’

Chasity’s Week Two Bath9

Chasity’s Challenges: Chasity’s Week Two Bath: 4-10-20

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4-10-20:

It was the end of March when Chasity first arrived and the weather was much too cold to even think about giving her a bath, even with our indoor facility. Even though the equines come in to us with Health Certificates and a Coggins Test, we are still very careful about keeping them in quarantine for 30 days and bathing them for hygiene purposes. Chasity would be no exception.

Finally on April 10, it was warm enough to bath her. The water at the outside hitch rail would be too cold, so I opted to bath her in the Tack Barn where there was warm water. Chasity was about to experience her first bath at the Lucky Three Ranch! I began with the lower part of her front legs, then moved to her forehead and worked my way down her neck after spreading a line of shampoo across the full length of her body. I did not use the shampoo on her face.

Ordinarily, I do not use soap during the yearly bathing, but since she had come from another location, I used my Tres Semme Breakage Defense shampoo. It is not as drying as some shampoos and does not require any conditioning. As I sprayed her with water, the suds came up and I followed the sudsy water with my shedding blade to eradicate the dirt from her body as she was rinsed.

As I scraped her with the shedding blade, I just kept the water flowing until no more dirt and suds came from each area. Chasity was not exactly thrilled and moved into me and up against the hitch rail where I could not reach her. I just adjusted the spray to more power and aimed it at her flanks until she moved over. Then I adjusted the spray to be lighter and less penetrating again.

Once she was willing to stand still, I was able to check some questionable spots on her body. He chest had completely healed from the old bug bites, but I did notice a bald spot on her right hind leg. It didn’t look like much and I thought it would probably fill in with hair as her good hygiene was maintained. If need be, I would treat that with Neosporin, too. It works well on most things like this that donkeys seem to get quite often, including “jack sores.”

After the right side was all done, she was rewarded for being a good girl! After chewing her reward of crimped oats, we resumed first with her forehead on the left side.

I worked my way down the left side the same way as I had done on the right side…covered the length of her body with shampoo, followed by water and scraping the suds and dirt from her body with the shedding blade.

She was much better on this side! I sprayed her teats clean and she stood like a trooper!

She now knew what to expect and was amply rewarded for her efforts!

I had prepared to dry her with a hair dryer, but it was so warm, I decided to try her on the hotwalker. I wasn’t sure about how she would take it, but I took it slow, tied her with the chain looped through the ring on her halter and not under her chin. She walked right off as if she had done it all her life!

She dried much more quickly than she would have had I used the hair dryer! I was so proud of Chasity! I think she is finally beginning to trust us!!!

AHC Latest News- May 29, 2020

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The following is from the American Horse Council:

May 29, 2020
Special COVID-19 Issue

Copyright © 2020 American Horse Council

The AHC News is provided to you as a benefit of your AHC membership, and we hope you find the articles informative and useful. While the AHC does grant permission for newsletter articles to be passed on, we hope you will encourage those you are sharing the articles and information with to join the AHC so they can stay informed and up-to-date!

 Permission to pass on the AHC News articles to your members, readers, or others is granted on the condition that it is forwarded in its original form or directly linked with the AHC logo and a link to the AHC website.
Don’t forget to read all the way to the bottom of the newsletter as there’s some great stuff down there.

Resources for Horse Owners
https://unitedhorsecoalition.org/covid-19-resources/#horse-owners

Although many states across the country are starting to loosen restrictions, the COVID-19 pandemic is still wreaking havoc on every sector of our economy. One of the places this is most obvious are unemployment numbers, which continue to rise.

So what to do if you’re a horse owner and find yourself suddenly jobless?

If you keep your horses at home, there are some simple steps you can take to start reducing expenses. Turn your horses out as long as possible – even 24/7 if your situation permits. With spring grass in full force, you’ll be able to cut down on hay and grain, plus bedding. However if your horses haven’t been turned out on grass yet this year, introduce it slowly to reduce colic and laminitis risks.

This year’s hay crop is starting to come in. If you typically purchase a big supply, see if your hay producer will work with you on delivering smaller loads or taking monthly payments. Remember they have expenses too so see what you can do to meet halfway.

Look into other options for decreasing grain consumption, such as hay cubes or hay extenders. These might not be necessary while the grass is good but come fall and winter they could help you save money. Work with your vet for recommendations specific to your horses and their needs.

If you keep your horses shod, one or more might be able to go barefoot. Work with your farrier and veterinarian to see if this is a possibility.

Maintain your horse’s regular health and hoof care. This includes vaccinations, fecal counts/deworming, and hoof trims and shoes. Skimping in these areas now will quite possibly lead to bigger, more expensive problems down the road – the old “penny wise, pound foolish” saying comes to mind. Since it’s unlikely you’ll be traveling to shows or competitions, ask your vet to administer only the core vaccines.

If you board, many of the items above still apply, especially health and hoof care. In a boarding situation, you might be able split the vet’s farm call fee if several boarders have him or her out at the same time.

If your horse is in less work, ask the barn owner or manager to decrease the amount of grain fed – not to save costs but to prevent your horse from gaining the horsey equivalent of the “quarantine 15”.

Is there somebody else at the barn that might do a full or part lease on your horse for a few months? If so, be sure to be specific about who is responsible for specific expenses, such as farrier bills, fly spray and the like. Better to have everything covered!

Talk with your horse friends, surf social media and google for other ideas on how to manage your equine expenses through these difficult days. Horse people are a creative and resilient group and there are lots of ideas out there that might work in your circumstances.

Lastly, think about what drew you to horses in the first place. Take a breath and call out the 10-year-old child that still lives in you and relish simply being with your horse. Go on trail rides. Play games. Linger in the barn instead of always rushing. Your love of horses remains intact despite these dark days, and hopefully you can draw some comfort from that.

Submitted by: Molly O’Brien – Program Manager Time to Ride

Resources for Small Businesses
https://unitedhorsecoalition.org/covid-19-resources/#equine-businesses

  According to the 2017 AHC Foundation Equine Economic Impact Study, 30% of American households  include an equine enthusiast. Arguably, every one of those enthusiasts have been impacted in the last three months. As have the operations that cater to each and everyone of those horse fans, owners and riders. As the impact of COVID-19 continues to unfold, our industry needs to keep a close eye on changing customer behaviors and ask the right questions to ensure that we are prepared for any negative outcomes or new opportunities. Steps need to be taken during the transitional period between quarantine and reopening to protect long-term interest, satisfaction, and engagement.

What you need to consider for your business;

  1. What is the core service your business provides your clientele?
  2. How are your core clients or customers impacted by COVID-19?
  3. How can you provide more value to those customers through your products or services?
  4. How is Coronavirus influencing their spending habits?
  5. Is this an opportunity for you to go above and beyond to give back?
  6. Are your employees safe and are you offering safe experiences for clients?

With the economic downturn, consumer behavior is likely to change drastically. For those without significant disposable income, those planning for/are in retirement and for small business owners, an economic downturn might result in a sharp decline in their propensity or ability to spend. While consumers could take a “wait and see” approach, businesses should consider their target audience and how spending habits may change as a result of the current economic climate. Several ways to keep spending “horsey” in your community include;

  • Keep current customers happy: Loyal customers give you more sales opportunities. Be sure to communicate business changes, including hours of operations, virtual offerings, and managerial decisions to keep customers in the loop during shifting times. Communicating is more important than ever right now.
  • Boost your customer baseIncreased “work from home” periods will naturally lead to an increase in fair weather outdoor activities. Get creative and hustle. Leave no stone unturned in pulling “newbies” into the horse industry. And don’t stop marketing. A lot of businesses will pull back on the cash flow of marketing funds. This can give you a chance to attract the attention of new clients. Time to Ride is a great resource for barns, visit https://timetoride.org/
  • Sharpen your pencil: This period has upended everything, so now is the time to reflect and reassess your current business strategy as well as to gather, understand, and process local-based data to make strategic decisions for your business.

When businesses invest in creating a quality experience, clients notice. According to an online poll, 86% of customers are willing to pay more for better customer experience. Therefore, it pays to create a superior customer experience. Instead of losing track of your customer’s voice in the vast sea of noise, make sure that you can listen closely and understand how they feel about your business. Now is the time to “lean in” to the communication tools that customers prefer, i.e. digital tools like text messaging, video chat, social media services, etc.

Additionally, businesses that put people in close proximity to others will potentially face challenges, as users are choosing to avoid close contact in exchange for staying home. This will not only impact a company’s bottom lines but also their employees’ work schedules and employment status. Businesses need to provide clear direction on how they will proceed in light of the reopening. As the overall concern for personal health continues, owners and managers will be forced to communicate how they are not only taking precautions with their own employees but also how safety control mechanisms are operating to ensure no contamination or spread of the virus to their customers or clients.

Overarchingly, equine businesses will have to do what they have always done best – adapt. Staying on top of the latest trends, watching the data for insight, and understanding new consumer behaviors will be key in driving successful marketing strategies moving forward. The American Horse Council will continue to look for strategies to help meet the needs of the equine industry, and we would ask any equine business owners or operators affected by the outbreak or the subsequent quarantine to fill out the AHC survey found here  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/AHCCOVID19Impact This will be critical to measuring the impact of this pandemic in between the 2017 and the upcoming 2022 AHC Foundation Equine Economic Studies.  Please contact info@horsecouncil.org if you have questions or information you would like shared.

Submitted by: Cliff Williamson, Director of Health & Regulatory Affairs

Resources for Non-Profits
https://unitedhorsecoalition.org/covid-19-resources/#equine-non-profits

“Aggie” Non-for-Profit Groups Advocate for Expanded Paycheck Protection Eligibility

On May 26, AHC, the American Association of Equine Practitioners, the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Grange and other agriculture groups submitted joint-letters to Sens. McConnell (R-KY), Rubio (R-FL) and Cardin (D-MD), urging extension of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) to organizations filing as 501(c)(4), (c)(5) and (c)(6) entities .  As previously reported, the CARES Act currently restricts non-profit eligibility for PPP to 501(c)(3) and (c)(19) groups, thereby excluding a broad spectrum of professional and trade associations and labor unions.  As Congress continues to consider additional COVID-19 relief legislation and more narrow vehicles in the House and Senate focusing on additional paycheck protection flexibility, opportunities will arise to continue to amend PPP.

While the House-passed “HEROES Act” extended PPP eligibility to all not-for-profit organizations, much work needs to be done, especially in the Senate.  The coalition points out that there are thousands of not for profits groups formed as a 501(c)(4), (5) or (6) that support or promote critical essential professions, industries, small businesses and workers. Many of these are important ag-focused, non-profit groups serve as key resources for farming best practices, market data, educational outreach, agricultural education, and most urgently, pandemic-related assistance.  Without the benefit of 501(c) (4), (5) or (6) operations, a diverse group of employers including family farms, horse breeding operations, and state and county fairs, just to name a few examples, could lose an important resource for tools necessary to move beyond the pandemic and resume their roles as top job creators.

Although next steps remain uncertain, lawmakers will likely come to the table to negotiate so-called “phase four” relief legislation this summer. In conjunction with House passage of a narrow set of PPP flexibilities on May 28, Senate Majority Leader McConnell (R-KY) has stated that the Senate would take up the issue in June.  AHC will continue to update you on activities related to economic measures impacting the horse industry.

Submitted by: Bryan Brendle, Director of Policy & Legislative Affairs

 Resources for Equine Associations

The United Horse Coalition (UHC) knows that Associations are a great place for horse owners to find help and support within the equine community. We’re encouraging Associations across all breeds and disciplines to check out our newest resource for horse owners – the searchable Equine Resource Database.

We pushed up the release of our searchable Equine Resource Database in the wake of COVID-19, in an effort to compile a listing of all known safety net programs available in the nation to help owners who are in need. By having one centrally located area to access these resources, UHC hopes it will help owners keep their horses from becoming at-risk during these trying times.

We also added a new searchable component on the website to make it even easier for those in need of safety net programs to access the information they require. For example, an owner in need of a hay bank, will choose the resource they are in need of from a drop down menu, put in the state in which they reside and the search database will display any available resources in their vicinity. In addition to the resources, users can filter by breed specific rescues and those organizations holding accreditations or affiliations with various organizations.

We know this tool will be a great benefit not only for horse owners, but Associations looking for ways to support their members experiencing difficulties. We encourage all Associations to share the Equine Resource Database with their members and affiliates, in hopes that those in need of help can find support local to them.

We are also asking Associations to check out the database and let us know if we are missing any breed or discipline specific safety net programs. Associations have the best understanding of the support available to their members, and we want to make sure we’re sharing the most accurate list of resources as possible. If you think we’re missing a resource or safety net program, email us at UHC@HorseCouncil.Org and we’ll gladly add it to the database!

Submitted by: Ashley Harkins, Director of UHC and Emily Stearns, Program Manager EWDC

Membership Spotlight

We all go to a horse race to experience the thrill of the race!  We walk in wondering what horse to bet on, should I bet on Shoot Down the LineSnow Dancer, or maybe go for the long shot and bet on Chocolate Sundae ?  Or maybe you aren’t there for the horses, maybe you’re there on one of three special race days, the Triple Crown, to just enjoy the excitement of the moment!  But did you ever stop for a moment and think about the jockeys?  The men and women who sit atop the best horses, who lead them into the starting gates, riding them through the turns, and ultimately crossing the finish line?  One group has and will continue to be the voice of the professional jockeys of the thoroughbred and quarter horse racing industry – The Jockeys’ Guild!

Founded in 1940 after an injury to Sammy Renick who was recuperating from a broken leg in the hospital and a visit from Eddie Arcaro, a discussion ensued, leading to the creation of an organization representing the interests of jockeys.  Jumping ahead 80 years, the Jockey Guild represents approximately 1250 professional jockeys of thoroughbred and quarter horse racing, to include active, retired, and disabled jockeys.  Huge strides have been made since the founding of the Guild: health insurance for qualified members and families, helmet, vests, and safety rail improvements, padded starting gaits, and enhancements to safety standards.  Making continued strides in health and safety to include improved medical standards and paramedics and medical directors at each track, continued testing of current safety equipment, and developing procedures in response to traumatic head and spinal injuries after on-track accidents.

With the changing climate of COVID-19 the Jockeys’ Guild and racing will most likely be impacted for the next 9-12 months.  Changes in budget, how races are viewed, and how fans can attend are all aspects needing to be addressed when racing fully opens for the public.  But the Jockeys’ Guild is in a good place.  They have not overspent their budget, staying within the boundaries they set, spent wisely, and have provided benefits for their members.  Some racetracks remained open during the lockdown, which is a positive for the industry as whole.  But the industry will likely be impacted for the next 9 to 12 months, but with organizations like the Jockeys’ Guild supporting their members, the industry is resilient, determined, and will flourish once again.

So, the next time you go to the races to watch Chocolate Sundae win the third leg of the Triple Crown, remember the jockey who was led into the starting gate, who maneuvered her through the pack, to ultimately sit in the winner’s circle enjoying the excitement of winning the Triple Crown!  The jockey is the unsung hero of horse racing, thank you Jockeys’ Guild for all you do for the jockey!

Submitted by: Lynda Majerowicz, Membership Specialist

 

Congress Must Pass the Great American Outdoors Act!

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The following is from the American Horse Council:

Tell Your Senators to Vote for “Great American Outdoors Act”

As the states move to re-open public lands, Congress has a major opportunity to pass important trails legislation that will get Americans outside while promoting the health of recreational riders and other outdoor enthusiasts.  Thanks in large part to continued advocacy from the horse industry, a bipartisan group of senators has sponsored the “Great American Outdoors Act of 2020” (S. 3422).  Before adjourning for a Memorial Day break, Senate Majority Leader McConnell stated that this important recreation bill will come up for a vote in June.   Please contact your senators today!

Take Action

Meet Herbie and Papa Antonio: Two very special burros who want to meet you

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

This May is #BurroAwarenessMonth. Burros are amazing animals — intelligent, social and highly adapted to their often harsh and rugged desert habitats. Like wild horses, wild burros are protected under federal law as “living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West.”

AWHC created Burro Awareness Month to shine a spotlight on our nation’s wild burros, who don’t get the same level of attention as wild horses, but are just as incredible and historic.

As we close out the month, we wanted to share the stories of two very special burros: Herbie and Papa Antonio, one no longer wild and one still free, each touched by the same challenges facing all wild burros under the management of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Meet Herbie and The Herd Many Of You Recently Defended

Photo Credit: PJ Kaszas

Herbie is a wild burro who calls the BLM’s Black Mountain Herd Management Area (HMA) in Arizona his home. Black Mountain is the largest HMA in the state, comprising more than 1 million acres of public lands, and it is also home to the largest and most genetically diverse burro population in the country.

PJ Kaszas is a wildlife and documentary photographer who co-founded the Wild Horse Photography Collective and Bonkers for Burros, two fast growing communities of photographers dedicated to advocating for wild horses and burros (and we’re proud to partner with many of them!).

PJ went to photograph the Black Mountain burros, who can be difficult to find, due to both the large expanse of desert and terrain they live in and because the burros blend so well in to this environment.

When interacting with wildlife, it’s important to respect their space and keep your distance. That’s what makes this encounter all the more unique: Herbie actually approached PJ, and while PJ kept a distance of 75 feet or so, Herbie wasn’t bothered by the camera and actually went on to guide PJ over the course of three days throughout the Black Mountain HMA.

Photo Credit: PJ Kaszas

Herbie greeted old friends, interacted with some rivals, and even showed PJ where he and other burros go to forage, grab a drink, and rest.

You can read more about PJ’s experiences with Herbie and see more photos here. Additionally, we wanted to thank you: Late March we launched an action alert about the Bureau of Land Management Plan to remove 75% of the burros, like Herbie, from this area.

Thousands of you stepped up to raise your voices and we had one of our largest showings of force in defense of burros in recent memory.

Rescuing Papa Antonio And Finding Him A Forever Home

One of the unfortunate realities of the federal mass roundup/removal program is that many captured wild burros and horses, especially those who are older or injured or have health complications, are at risk of ending up in kill pens or being dumped after being sold for $25 or less.

That was potentially going to happen to Papa Antonio, a 21-year old burro who caught the eye of our Nevada Field Rep., Deb Walker, who noticed him in the BLM’s online auction earlier this year. AWHC contacted our friends at the Center for Animal Protection & Education (CAPE) to see if they would take him to live with their herd of seven rescued burros and two rescued horses. CAPE said yes!

Last year, Papa Antonio was trapped and removed from the BLM’s Seven Troughs HMA, located 75 miles northeast of Reno. He was sent to the Carson City prison, where he spent eight months in a holding pen and was put up for auction in February.

AWHC was pleased to partner with CAPE to rescue him. Since March, when CAPE picked him up from the BLM holding facility in Nevada, Papa Antonio has become a very affectionate little burro, and is now fully integrated with CAPE’s rescue herd.

We’re working to ensure all wild burros can spend their golden years on public lands, but the next best place for a burro like Papa Antonio is with CAPE. Watch his transformation here.

We hope you enjoyed digitally meeting Herbie and Papa Antonio. Here at AWHC, we treat every month as if it were #BurroAwarenessMonth, because all of our treasured wild burros deserve to live on the wide open ranges with their families, safe from roundups and free from the grim fate of a crowded holding facility, or worse slaughter.

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

Donate

URGENT CALL – CLOCK IS TICKING! ELDERLY MULE 911 WE HAVE ONE CHANCE TO KEEP THIS SWEET OLD MULE FROM GOING TO SLAUGHTER!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

The calls keep coming. Another 911, another life to save!

An urgent call to save this precious life“GRANDPA GUS” is so sad and confused. He doesn’t understand what is happening to him. Look at his sad little face.

PLEASE DONATE so we can save his life. This is time sensitive and extremely urgent. I just couldn’t bear to let him ship, so I took another leap of faith. I KNOW our Chilly Pepper family will come together to save him.

In April alone, Y’ALL HAVE SAVED 41 BABIES AND 3 ADULTS, including a gorgeous stallion shown below, and two mares, one of them a pregnant mare and the other a “gelding” who actually is a mare. So 3 adult lives and 41 babies. You ARE making a huge difference. It took a lot of funding, but y’all came through!

Today, let’s change the WHOLE WORLD FOR “GRANDPA GUS”!! He does not deserve to ship to slaughter. We are the only ones who can save him now. Please help if you can and share far and wide!

Standing by for the trappers (as usual). However, it was wonderful to be able to save the additional adults due to the fact the horses escaped the trap last week.

This gorgeous stallion (shown below) is now living in Oregon with a wonderful woman who has years of experience with the wild ones, including stallions. Y’ALL SAVED HIM!!

Most all the babies out of the first groups have been adopted, thanks to an amazing group of women.

But TODAY, WE NEED TO SAVE “GRANDPA GUS”! Remember, the clock is ticking.

THANK YOU to everyone who donated to save April’s horses. It meant everything to each and every one of them who were given a chance to be saved.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme 

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Quick Action Alert: A unique opportunity to score a major victory for wild horses

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) just submitted its report to Congress on the future of their Wild Horse and Burro program.

In this plan, the agency outlines the removal of as many as 20,000 wild horses from public lands per year and leaves the door open to permanent sterilization of mares through an inhumane surgical procedure.

Here is where we need your help: Congress has 60-days to weigh in on this plan. At the same time, members of the House and the Senate are working on the next appropriations bill to fund the government for Fiscal Year (FY) 2021, which begins on October 1, 2020.

The House Chairman of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chairman, Raul Grijalva, and fellow wild horse champions in both chambers of Congress are advocating for the inclusion of language that would require the BLM to utilize humane, reversible fertility control with the money they appropriate to the agency.

The language would also prohibit surgical sterilization of wild horses and burros on the range.

We need your elected officials on Capitol Hill to support this request to protect wild horses and burros from mass roundups and brutal sterilization surgeries: Click here to send a message to your Representative and Senators to support wild horses and burros in the appropriations process.

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

P.S. For a more detailed analysis of the plan, click here.

Donate

AHC Latest News- May 22, 2020

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The following is from the American Horse Council:

May 22, 2020
Special COVID-19 Issue

Copyright © 2020 American Horse Council

The AHC News is provided to you as a benefit of your AHC membership, and we hope you find the articles informative and useful. While the AHC does grant permission for newsletter articles to be passed on, we hope you will encourage those you are sharing the articles and information with to join the AHC so they can stay informed and up-to-date!

Permission to pass on the AHC News articles to your members, readers, or others is granted on the condition that it is forwarded in its original form or directly linked with the AHC logo and a link to the AHC website.

Don’t forget to read all the way to the bottom of the newsletter as there’s some great stuff down there.

Survey COVID-19 Economic Impact on Equine Industry
___________________________________________

The American Horse Council is conducting a brief survey (14 questions which take less than 10 minutes) to determine the economic impacts of COVID-19 on the equine industry. We would very much appreciate your assistance with collecting this information. The only thing you need to have handy is your total horse related income and expenses for March 2019 and March 2020 so we have some comparison.

It’s important to note that for statistical reasons we are sending this survey to a predetermined 1,000 people. Please do NOT forward this or share this survey with others as statisticians will be scaling the responses and we must preserve the sample size .This survey will close May 30, 2020, and depending on the pandemic’s length we will reissue to get up to date numbers and data.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/AHCCOVID19Impact
Thank you. Be well and Be Safe. #HorseStrong

Resources for Horse Owners
https://unitedhorsecoalition.org/covid-19-resources/#horse-owners

Horse Industry, Outdoor Groups Endorse “Great American Outdoors Act of 2020”

On May 6, 2020, the American Horse Council, American Sportfishing Association, American Trails and more than 25 other members of the Outdoor Recreation Roundtable (ORR) sent a letter to Congress urging lawmakers to pass the “Great American Outdoors Act” (S. 3422). The bill would not only promote outdoor activities as states begin to ease social distancing requirements, but it would also achieve key horse industry objectives such as fully funding the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).  S. 3422 will fully fund LWCF by investing $900 million per year for public lands, parks and trails. Serving as a “recreational package” discussed by Senate staff with members of the horse industry earlier this year, the bill would also address the nation’s public lands maintenance backlog.  Reducing the backlog in trails maintenance projects is a goal industry has fought for within the context of the “Restore Our Parks Act” (ROPA), among other vehicles.  During the past year, members of the horse industry have submitted more than 200 letters to lawmakers urging passage of individual trails bills.  The bill will also help to bolster recreation-focused business, including riding barns, as Americans seek to spend time outdoors during the months ahead.

S. 3422 is timely and will help expedite a transition to more flexible social distancing practices, including the re-opening of access to the nation’s trails. The National Park Service (NPS) is adopting a phased approach to open trails in the nation’s 62 national parks, consistent with the “Opening Up America Again Guidelines” released by the Administration on April 16.  In a statement from the Department of Interior (DOI), Secretary Bernhardt affirmed the agency’s plan to work with governors and assess the circumstances of each state, thereby initiating a “park by park” approach to reopening access.  During the week of May 9, for example, DOI announced the reopening of 16 national parks, including the Blue Ridge Parkway of North Carolina, the Grand Canyon, and the Curecanti National Recreation Area of Colorado, to name a few.  To view a list of parks included in the recent, large-scale opening, please see the following link:  https://www.doi.gov/pressreleases/case-you-missed-it-interior-continues-safely-restore-access-public-lands .  For an “A to Z” list of national parks that have re-opened, or are in the process of easing restrictions to access, please visit the following web site:  https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/2020/05/reopening-national-park-system-whats-open.

Submitted by:  Bryan Brendle, Director of Policy & Legislative Affairs

Resources for Small Businesses
https://unitedhorsecoalition.org/covid-19-resources/#equine-businesses

SBA, Congress Roll Out Paycheck Protection Tools, Proposed Changes

While Congress debates next steps related to stimulus bills, the Administration continues to release guidance and other tools to clarify the Paycheck Protection Program’s (PPP) implementation, especially its signature “loan forgiveness” provision.  On May 15, SBA released the PPP Loan Forgiveness Application, including instructions for its completion, a “Schedule A” and related worksheet.

According to SBA, the 11-page form includes “several measures to reduce compliance burdens and simplify the process for borrowers.”  These include options for businesses “to calculate payroll costs using an alternative payroll covered period that aligns with borrowers’ regular payroll cycles” and “flexibility to include eligible payroll and non-payroll expenses paid or incurred during the eight-week period,” among other measures.  Importantly, the new form addresses some of the feedback from members of the horse industry, including “step-by-step instructions on how to perform the calculations required by the CARES Act to confirm eligibility for loan forgiveness.”

Because the “covered period” for Paycheck Protection loans begins on the date that the bank actually disburses a loan to the borrower, it’s important to track various expenses during the window outlined by the CARES Act.  To view a copy of the 11-page application and instructions, please click here: https://www.sba.gov/document/sba-form–paycheck-protection-program-loan-forgiveness-application .
Despite a congressional impasse over so-called Phase Four legislation to address the coronavirus, House and Senate lawmakers are rolling out their own bipartisan flexibility measures focusing on narrow fixes to the PPP. The House will vote next week on the “Paycheck Protection Flexibility Act” (H.R. 6886), introduced by Reps. Dean Phillips (D-MN) and Chip Roy (R-TX) on May 11.  Highlights include the following provisions, which in part reflect feedback from members of the horse industry who are navigating the program:

  • Eliminating a provision requiring 75 percent of proceeds to cover payroll expenses as a pre-condition for loan forgiveness;
  • Allowing employers to participate in payroll tax deferment and the PPP;
  • Extending re-hire deadlines beyond June 30;
  • And extending the “cover period” beyond the current eight-week timeframe, more accurately reflecting the time expected for consumer demand to gain traction and drive revenue.

To view a copy of a statement related to H.R. 6886, please see the following:
https://roy.house.gov/media/press-releases/reps-chip-roy-and-dean-phillips-release-paycheck-protection-flexibility-act .  On the other side of the Capitol, Senators Rubio (R-FL), Cardin (D-MD), Collins (R-ME) and Shaheen (D-NH) have offered the “Paycheck Protection Program Extension Act.”  This narrow bill would also provide flexibility, including extension of the loan application filing deadline from June 30, 2020 to December 31, 2020 and extension of the cover period from eight to 16 weeks of expenses.

Submitted by: Bryan Brendle, Director of Policy & Legislative Affairs

Resources for Non-Profits
https://unitedhorsecoalition.org/covid-19-resources/#equine-non-profits
Nonprofits in the Time of COVID-19

While every sector of our economy and our lives has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, the nonprofit sector has taken an especially hard hit. This includes the horse industry. From breed and discipline associations to rescues and equine-assisted therapy centers, income is down, while expenses are not.

In many respects, our national breed and discipline organizations are part of the foundation of the horse world. At their core, they maintain the purity of our breeds and set the rules and standards for competition. While you might never own a purebred horse, remember that breed standards typically include conformation, helping ensure that there’s a genetic pool of strong, athletic animals for future generations. The rules they establish for competition gives everyone guidelines to follow, right down to the local level. Sure, you might not agree with everything they do, but these organizations lay the foundation upon which we all build.

What can organizations in this sector do? Ask people to renew their memberships, even if they don’t “need” it this year because they don’t plan to compete. Remind them to register their foals, and transfer registrations for horses they’ve bought or sold. Many organizations have magazines that typically rely on competitions to generate advertising. Ask your advertisers to place an ad just to highlight their horses, even if they don’t have show wins to brag about. Many times people just need to be asked or reminded – and don’t be afraid to tell them why you need their support right now.

Rescues are more obviously feeling the pinch. While money is always needed, think of other ways people can help. Depending on your state’s regulations you might not be able to have a lot of volunteers on the property, leaving you to do more of the manual labor and less time to spend in the office. Consider looking for volunteers that can help with other aspects of your operation that allow them to stay socially distanced. For example, you might find someone to help with your record-keeping or scheduling appointments. You could look for one or more people that can assist with your local promotion, from social media posts to writing and distributing press releases. Lots of people with lots of different skills are unemployed or under-employed right now and would welcome an opportunity to keep their skills sharp while helping you.

Equine-assisted therapy centers are also under the gun. Many of your riders need more hands-on assistance than can be given under social distancing rules, so your lesson volume is down yet you still have to maintain your horses. Similar to rescues, think outside the box for ways people can help, such as record-keeping and promotion. There are options for fundraising as well – for example, there’s a company that lets you design and sell t-shirts and similar apparel with no upfront inventory requirement, and they do the fulfillment as well. This helps raise funds and helps promote your program as more and more people are out and about displaying your organization’s name and artwork. For this group, staying in touch with your lesson clients is also important. Try to find the time – or a volunteer with time – to do photos or videos of your lesson horses and post them on social media or email them directly to your customers. While the smile on the child’s face won’t be quite as big as in person, they’ll still be thrilled to connect with their favorite horses. These ideas work well for regular lesson programs too!

While the world looks very different today than it did just a few months ago, we’re all learning to adjust, and eventually we’ll be much closer to the world we knew than the one we’re living in now. In the meantime, help if you can, and ask for help if you need it.

Submitted by: Molly O’Brien – Program Manager for Time to Ride

 Resources for Equine Associations

Virtual Solutions for Association Events During the COVID-19 Pandemic

The April 2020 meeting of the American Physical Society (APS) was scheduled to take place in Washington DC. But when the coronavirus pandemic made a physical gathering impossible, the organizers decided to hold the entire event online and made registration free and open to everyone. With around 1,700 people typically attending the meeting, 7,267 registered this time. Nearly every sector of the equine community host in-person, large scale meetings and expos like this, and are faced with cancellations and rescheduling. Virtual events may be the best choice for our industry during this tumultuous time.

Online meetings might lack many of the benefits of an in-person conference: conversations over dinner; face-to-face networking; fresh perspectives that can come from simply leaving one’s home ground. Regardless, as more meetings move online — a trend likely to continue even after the pandemic fades — organizations may need to accept the new virtual reality of group gatherings.  The most successful virtual conferences and meetings can seamlessly integrate speakers, technology, content, networking, and sponsors in a way that creates real impact for attendees. The interest in listening or engaging in multiple talks without leaving home has proven to be enticing to new participants, increasing engagement.

Virtual conferences might lack the intimacy of a physical gathering, but it’s still possible for attendees to connect with each other. Virtual event platforms often have a chat function allowing for real-time feedback. Some students and younger professionals might even find digital communication with industry leaders to be less intimidating than a face-to-face encounter, in addition to being less time intensive. Additionally, with the rising costs of travel and a decreasing amount of travel funding had ended opportunities for  regular travel to far-off conferences. The COVID-19 pandemic may cause more conferences in the future to adopt a ‘hybrid’ approach, with both physical and virtual attendees.
Virtual meetings have some other advantages compared with a physical one. Live talks could be paused or rewound, a useful feature for those who missed details or wanted to spend more time pondering a crucial slide. Speakers can pre-record presentations in case of scheduling conflicts. Watching talks from home can ease a bit of the pressure of attending a large conference that would require dashing from one session to another across a vast convention halls. This allows for attendance to  a wider variety of sessions than normal, for both speakers and attendees, since switching between parallel sessions can be seamless.
The pandemic continues to present interesting challenges for the equine industry and as solutions to these challenges present themselves, the American Horse Council with share them. Please contact the AHC at info@horsecouncil.org with more questions or solutions you would like shared.

Submitted by: Cliff Williamson, Director of Health & Regulatory Affairs

Membership Spotlight

With the struggles of trying to find different ways to stay engaged and active during these uncertain time of COVID-19, one organization, the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA) is keeping their youth active and engaged.  The AQHA, one of the oldest members of the American Horse Council (AHC), since 1970, has over 220,000+ members and over 18,000+ American Quarter Horse Youth Association (AQHYA) members.  The AQHYA promotes leadership, competition, and other non-horse related activities for the horse loving youth and is the largest youth equine association.
AQHA will keep the AQHYA members engaged  with the help of the AHC on Monday, June 8 and Tuesday, June 9, 2020 approximately 20 youth members will join the AHC for virtual Hill visits having meetings with Reps. Ted Yoho (R-FL) and Kurt Schrader (D-OR) who championed the Preventing All Soring Tactics (PAST) Act.  AHC also reached out to Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX) to participate but has not confirmed.  Another topic which may be discussed is federal funding for equine assisted therapy for veterans.
We look forward to helping the #MyWhyChallenge through Leadership Development for the Power of YOUth.  These YOUth members are our leaders of tomorrow who are willing to learn today setting the stage for a lifetime of success.

Submitted by: Lynda Majerowicz, Membership Specialist

Breaking: The BLM is setting the stage for the slaughter of America’s wild horses

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The Bureau of Land Management just issued its long-overdue report to Congress on how the agency plans to proceed with managing America’s wild horse and burro population.

Before I go into more detail, I want to briefly summarize the most troubling aspects of this report and the failed approaches the BLM is advocating for:

  • The BLM’s plan would authorize mass roundups to remove up to 20,000 wild horses per year; culling wild herds by 70%;
  • For the first time, the permanent sterilization of mares through an ineffective and inhumane procedure would be utilized;
  • Private contractors would be enriched by the BLM tripling the population of wild horses in crowded holding pens and pastures;
  • This plan would carry a cost of $1 billion to taxpayers over the next five years and that’s only a portion of the cost expected for its two-decade timeframe.

There are three major takeaways I want to provide about this plan, and as grim as it sounds, I also want to remind everyone that this isn’t set in stone: We have time to stop it from happening but in order to do so we’re all going to need to get involved.


Takeaway #1: Continuing On A Path to Failure


The BLM’s new plan is based on two faulty premises: the need to reduce wild populations to the “Appropriate” Management Level (AML) of 27,000 animals on 27 million acres of land, and the reliance on mass roundups and removals to get there.

Both premises have been discredited by the nation’s top scientific body — the National Academy of Sciences — which concluded that these management levels are “not based in science” and that mass removals are not only ineffective but also counterproductive and unsustainable.

And that doesn’t even take into consideration the massive cost to taxpayers and the cruelty inflicted on these innocent wild horses and burros. Or the fact that this plan, with its astronomically high price tag, is setting the stage for the mass slaughter of these treasured icons.


Takeaway #2: Only Congress Can Require the BLM to Change Course


Last year, Congress appropriated a $21 million increase for the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program, but specified that the funds would not become available until the agency submitted a report to Congress detailing its plan for managing America’s wild herds.The 60-day clock is now ticking and during this time Congress has the opportunity to weigh in on the mass roundup and warehousing plan.

Additionally, the House and the Senate are currently working on the next appropriations bill to fund the government in Fiscal Year (FY) 2021, which begins on October 1, 2020.

The good news is that Rep. Raul Grijalva, Chairman of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, which has direct oversight over the BLM, has expressed his intent to hold the BLM accountable.

He and several other members of the House and Senate have requested that FY 2021 Appropriations legislation include language to require BLM to utilize humane, reversible fertility control instead of spending all of its funding to round up more wild horses and burros, and to prohibit the agency from cruelly sterilizing wild horses and burros via invasive and risky surgical procedures.

To convince Congress to include this legislative language, we will have to overcome opposition from the Big Ag lobby and Big Humane groups (Humane Society of the U.S., ASPCA as well as Return to Freedom, a wild horse sanctuary), which last year opposed similar language to require BLM to utilize humane fertility control and prohibit surgical sterilization. That means we all need to weigh in now!


Takeaway #3: We Can Do This!


Against insurmountable odds, the movement to protect America’s cherished icons has achieved incredible successes.

And it’s important to remember that the American public is very much on our side: Nearly 80% of Americans do not support mass roundups or the sterilization of wild mares, and believe that these icons deserve to stay on the public lands they call home.

Through mobilization, advocacy, and public education campaigns, we’ve saved wild horses from extinction and slaughter before. Now, we’re being called to work together to do so again.

Here are two ways you can get involved so we can make the most of this window of opportunity:

  1. Click here to ask your Representative and Senators on Capitol Hill to support appropriations language to require BLM to implement humane management.
  2. Thank Rep. Grijalva for being the top champion in Congress for America’s wild horses and burros. As Chair of the House Natural Resources Committee, he is a powerful ally!

P.S. For a more detailed analysis of the plan, click here.

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Chasity’s Week Two Workout18

Chasity’s Challenges: Chasity’s Week Two Workout: 4/6,8,10/20

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4-6-20:

Today, Chasity did much better after two days of rest over the weekend. Her hair coat is much softer and her color is becoming more brilliant. She was moving around quite a bit while being groomed and had to be corrected. After being corrected and rewarded, she stood still.

4-8-20:

Today she was much better during grooming after being corrected the last time, although she was still a bit impatient. She wanted to continue forward before she finished chewing during her lesson in the Hourglass Pattern. I expect that will change in time.

She stood still while I wiped the dried milk-like drainage from her teats and scraped off her legs.

I also found dried bug bites of some sort on her chest that I thought could be old scars from hatched bots. I scraped them off with the shedding blade and treated them with Neosporin. It worked well.

It has only been a week of lessons, but we have made some progress with her neck. It is difficult to tell much from looking at the left side of her body. But now, when you look at her neck from the right side, you can see her mane sticking up across the top. We could not see it at all before.

The neck sweat Velcro is overlapping a bit more and I am able to tighten the adjustment on the “Elbow Pull” since she is now more flexible in her neck.

Her back is beginning to look better even from the start of the lesson. Although she still leans on it, she is randomly submitting to the “Elbow Pull” and matching my steps more easily.

Chasity continues to improve. She is happy to stand quietly, is more balanced over the ground rails and squares up much more easily with only slight indications from the lead rope.

4-10-20:

With each new lesson, Chasity continues to improve. It is only necessary to do the Hourglass Pattern once in one direction and then cross the diagonal and do it in the other direction, at least once per week and no more often than once every other day. She is now learning to bend through her rib cage while remaining erect around the turns in both directions.

Again, she is balanced over the ground rails, squares up nicely and maintains her good posture. She resumes the pattern and goes over the ground rails again for a balanced finish! There was no need for pulling on the lead rope at all, just slight indications!

Chasity’s overall balance and core strength is progressing faster than I would have thought. This is the reason I tell people that these lessons on the flat ground will need to be done for 3-6 months to gain ultimate postural balance and core strength before moving on to obstacles for the addition of coordination. Some equines do progress faster than others. Chasity appears to be one of the faster ones!

Action Alert: Four days to defend the freedom of 2,000 wild horses in Oregon

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

We’ve got less than a week to spring into action if we want to weigh in on plans that will affect nearly 2,000 wild horses in the state of Oregon.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) have both proposed wild horse management plans to target four different herds in the state that could, if they move forward without opposition, result in the removal of thousands of wild horses.


Action Alert #1: Stop the BLM from Removing 1,850 Horses From Three Herd Management Areas
Deadline: Monday, May 18th

The BLM is accepting public comments on a 10-year plan for three Herd Management Areas in Oregon’s Barren Valley Complex, covering nearly 1 million acres of public lands.

While the plan contains some encouraging components, including the implementation of humane, reversible fertility control before any roundups take place, it still calls for the removal of 1,850 wild horses over ten years.

Since the BLM has not prioritized roundups in this area for nearly a decade and the local BLM office has made an effort to utilize fertility control in local herds, this is a unique opportunity to support and expand fertility control programs to manage the horses humanely on the range.

Take Action: Urge the BLM to prioritize safe and humane fertility control over roundups in the Barren Valley Complex

Action Alert #2: Protect the Ochoco National Forest Horses
Deadline: Sunday, May 17th


At the same time, the U.S. Forest Service is targeting a wild horse herd in Oregon’s Big Summit Wild Horse Territory in the Ochoco National Forest.

The agency is seriously proposing an “Appropriate” Management Level (AML) for the area as low as 12 wild horses. That’s right, one dozen.

At the highest level, the AML would be 57 — that would translate to just one wild horse per nearly 500 acres of public land. Meanwhile, the Forest Service allows as many as 2,200 (!) privately owned sheep and lambs to graze there for periods of time, all at taxpayer expense.

In its Environmental Assessment (which is required by law), the Forest Service admitted that the Big Summit wild horses could be in genetic depression and reducing their numbers substantially, as they are proposing, will worsen this, threatening the future of this herd.

If that wasn’t bad enough, the Forest Service is also considering the use of dangerous sterilization procedures as a management tool for these protected wild horses.

Take Action: Sign onto our letter opposing the Forest Service’s proposed plan to dramatically reduce the population of the Big Summit Wild Horse Herd.

Thank you for taking action. If you can also share this email with even one or two friends, you will help us build the response we need to defend thousands of wild horses in Oregon.

We are grateful for your support,

American Wild Horse Campaign

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911 URGENT – TRAPPER JUST CALLED 25-50 BABIES IN HIS TRAP! BABIES NEED YOUR HELP RIGHT NOW!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

CHILLY PEPPER really needs your help now. Just got the call for between 25-50 BABIES!

URGENT 911 UPDATE

ANOTHER 911 CALL. Horses are in the trap right now!

We will need in around $20 – 25,000+/- to pull this rescue off. We have to pay Bail. We need to get the babies any medical treatment needed, (this last group had a baby with a fractured skull, and that was just one of the injuries). We need to get blood work, (Coggins), etc and health certs. We need to transport these babies home. We are going to need more panels and shelter as well.

The cost of milk alone will be astronomical. It takes roughly $300 worth of milk for 1 baby for one month. We are still early in the season, so they are still young and still need their milk. Multiply that by 50? That could be $10,000 – $15,000 FOR MILK ALONE!! This does not include shavings, hay, grain, meds or any of the other expenses these babies have. It is beyond go time. I am heading out the door.

PLEASE HELP NOW! I have to let the catcher know how many we can really take on. We can’t just “save them”. We have to be able to provide everything they need. I don’t want to say “NO” to even a single baby.

We need to make sure that we leave NO ONE behind. We need to save them ALL! It’s bad enough we cannot save the rest of the horses, but at least we can try and save their babies.

THANK YOU for saving the last 14. We have 5 left needing homes, and NOW we need to step up for this new batch of babies.

WHAT A MOTHER’S DAY GIFT it would be to save all of these babies. Please help if you want us to save them!! You decide how many we can save.

PLEASE help if you can! If you are not in a position to help financially, please say a prayer and share this with as many folks as you can. These lives are in danger and they still matter! Sadly, slaughter stops for no one and nothing.

Honestly, it is hard not to panic. Sometimes there aren’t as many as they think, but usually the numbers are larger by the time we get there. Can we raise enough to purchase and care for all of them? I have to go on Faith, and that is why I am heading out the door right now, even with the knowledge that we could only save a few at this point in time. But I have faith in God and I have faith in our Chilly Pepper Family. All lives Matter!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

-You can go to gofundme 

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

AHC Latest News- May 1, 2020

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The following is from the American Horse Council:

May 1, 2020
Special COVID-19 Issue

Copyright © 2020 American Horse Council

The AHC News is provided to you as a benefit of your AHC membership, and we hope you find the articles informative and useful. While the AHC does grant permission for newsletter articles to be passed on, we hope you will encourage those you are sharing the articles and information with to join the AHC so they can stay informed and up-to-date!

Permission to pass on the AHC News articles to your members, readers, or others is granted on the condition that it is forwarded in its original form or directly linked with the AHC logo and a link to the AHC website.

Don’t forget to read all the way to the bottom of the newsletter as there’s some great stuff down there.

Resources for Horse Owners

https://unitedhorsecoalition.org/covid-19-resources/#horse-owners

How to reopen your barn following the COVID19 quarantine

The COVID-19 pandemic is responsible for a complete shift in the daily lifestyle of everyone in the United States, including our horses. Living under quarantine, curfews, and learning how to work from home has reiterated how important barn visits are to mental health. As states across the country relax stay-at-home requirements, we have some tips on how to keep your horses, horse people, and your barn as healthy as possible.

  • Limit gatherings to as few people as possible, and continue to maintain the recommended social distancing protocols that include six (6) feet of separation between individuals. Just because the quarantine is being lifted doesn’t mean the threat is over.  COVID-19 can be detected in the air for up to 3 hours after being transmitted. Some stables have created a schedule where clients can reserve time slots for their visits, reducing the amount of people in the barn by only allowing 3-4 people present at once. This may be the most appropriate step forward for those barns in states that were forced to close outright.
  • Encourage proper hand-washing and provide as many locations/opportunities for people to do so. Due to the structure of the virus, washing hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds is the most effective way to prevent contamination. Hand sanitizer must contain at least 60% alcohol to be effective.
  • Make a daily or hourly cleaning chart to prevent virus transmission. Disinfect common contact areas regularly and avoid sharing equipment and supplies between people, COVID-19 can live on copper for up to four hours, cardboard for 24 hours, and plastic and stainless steel for up to 3 days.
    • Non-porous materials (leather bridles/saddles/halters, nylon halters/lead ropes, gate latches, door handles, spray nozzle) harbor the virus longer than porous materials (cotton lead ropes, saddle pads)
    • Clean communal leather tack daily with tack cleaner. Knowing how to properly disinfect tack is useful for any equestrian, be it for strangles or COVID-19. Aerosol sprays such as Lysol tend to strip leather of oils, so if you use an aerosol spray to disinfect your tack, be sure to let it dry completely and then recondition the leather to protect it. Soap and water is another effective way to break down the lining of bacteria and viruses and is often safe for most tack. Diluted bleach disinfects well, but leather may dry out and crack from repeated treatments.
    • Disinfect gate latches, spray nozzles, cross tie snaps, pitchforks, wheelbarrows, and other frequently used items regularly or after contact with personnel
    • Stall door latches, hose ends, light switches, faucets and feed scoops should be cleaned and disinfected frequently.
  • There may be state requirements to wear gloves or face coverings to reduce the risk of spreading germs. Many businesses will be looking to taking the temperature of those present in and will not allow anybody to come if they register a temperature or feel sick and this may go a long way to helping clients feel comfortable.
  • Long story short, nobody spends 2 months on the couch unscathed, so take it easy getting back into training. Many riding stables are closed to tenants and all equine events have been canceled in an effort to reduce the virus’s spread. Due to these closures, many horses are not receiving regular workout schedules, or maybe no exercise at all. While daily lifestyles are difficult for all during this pandemic, adapting a horse’s schedule to a life after quarantine can be equally as challenging. Exercise related injuries would be a terrible way to end the quarantine.

Making boarders and clients safe and secure will be critical in getting the horse industry back on its feet, and each facility, whether private or public, should have written policies regarding COVID-19 and expect all clients and professionals to adhere to them. Keeping our horses healthy has always been a priority, but without their owners you can’t keep the lights on. All of these tips, and more, can be found on the AHC COVID-19 Resource Page, please visit it here as we continue to update it during this transition.

Details: Contact Cliff Williamson at cwilliamson@horsecouncil.org

Resources for Small Businesses
https://unitedhorsecoalition.org/covid-19-resources/#equine-businesses

Congress, Administration Move Toward Next Steps for  “CARES Act 2.0” 

Since Congress passed the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act on April 24, also known as “CARES Act 1.5,” lawmakers and small business groups continue to identify ways to refine and expand the scope of the $660 billion Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).  For example, the horse industry is working with the Farm Bureau and others to secure eligibility of 501(C)5 groups for Paycheck Protection.  For background purposes, the tax code classifies 501(C)5 organizations as agriculture groups and labor unions.  If these ag-focused trade associations don’t receive emergency funds, then many agriculture operations could lose an important “go–to” source for economic data, best practices, and policy information.  The horse industry is also lobbying to include 501(c)6 groups – which include a broad swath of trade and professional associations – within the loan program.  Extending eligbility to more 501(C) groups could prove to be an uphill battle.  For example, many Republicans might oppose inclusion of 501(C)5’s on the grounds that they oppose labor unions.  And on the 501(C)6 front, many Democrats could raise objections, on the grounds that most Chambers of Commerce, a key pillar of the business lobby, classify as 501(C)6.  At the end of the day, lawmakers might agree to include “all of the above,” sealing a deal that has something for everybody.

Congress, SBA Must Make Paycheck Protection More “Ag Friendly
While Congress discusses CARES Act 2.0, the horse industry and its allies are also advocating for ways to expedite delivery of funds into the hands of agricultural borrowers.  AHC, the National Cattlemen Beef Association and the Farm Bureau, among others, are requesting more resources for rural lenders to distribute Paycheck Protection loans.  Specifically, the coalition is requesting that Congress include Farm Credit System lenders within future “set asides” for community banks.  The coalition is also encouraging Congress to continue to pressure SBA to process applications as quickly as possible so that funds can be delivered to rural America without further delay.  With respect to covered expenses related to rent, the horse industry and its allies are also asking that Congress include the rental of business-related equipment as an eligible expense under Paycheck Protection.  Also, a staff member of the Senate Agriculture Committee has stated that committee leadership supports publication of SBA guidance tailor-made for agriculture.

Lawmakers, Administration, Compile Wish Lists for CARES Act 2.0
Congress could face a prolonged stand-off in negotiations.  Not only will Democrats and Republicans in Congress have their differences, but the Administration will also have input.  For example, the Trump Administration has proposed a major infrastructure piece within a future package.  Many GOP leaders criticize this idea, mainly because of the hefty price tag.  Because the next package will begin to move in the House, many of the Democrats’ priorities will be embedded in the original bill, putting Senate Republicans on defense.  A House Democratic source identifies a $500 billion boost for state and local governments, more money for mass transit, and eliminating the cap on the State and Local Tax deduction, commonly referred to as the SALT deduction, included in recent tax reform legislation, as priorities in the next relief package.  GOP members, however, will advocate for civil liability protections related to COVID-19 exposure, an issue that will be a point of contention with Democrats.  While a path forward remains uncertain for items not directly related to COVID-19, lawmakers could face political pressure to move more quickly on narrow packages that directly address emergency relief measures, including SBA’s loan programs.

SBA Announces Record Processing of Paycheck Protection Loans
On May 3, one week following release of the second batch of funds totaling $310 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program, SBA announced that it made more 2.2 million loans.  This figure surpasses the 1.6 million loans distributed pursuant to “round one,” which began on April 3 and dried up on April 16.  During the first week, SBA had distributed $175 billion of loans, more than half the allotment authorized under the “Paycheck Protection and Health Care Enhancement Act,” also known as “CARES Act 1.5.”  According to SBA, the average size of the loans distributed totals $79,000, which is less than half the size of the loans disbursed during the first round.  To view a copy of the SBA statement related to loan statistics, please see the following link:  https://www.sba.gov/about-sba/sba-newsroom/press-releases-media-advisories/joint-statement-administrator-jovita-carranza-and-secretary-steven-t-mnuchin-success-paycheck

Details:  Bryan Brendle at bbrendle@horsecouncil.org.

 

Resources for Non-Profits
https://unitedhorsecoalition.org/covid-19-resources/#equine-non-profits

 Resources for Equine Associations

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a very significant on equine associations, as it has with all aspects of our lives. For national, regional and state breed and discipline organizations, the impact is both financial and a public relations dilemma. How do you promote memberships when the impetus for joining is often competition-related, and competitions are delayed or cancelled? What do you say to trainers whose livelihoods depend on competing and buying and selling horses? How do you respond to instructors who need lesson riders, but have had to close their doors to the public due to state regulations?

Many organizations have taken steps to provide guidance for their members as states start to gradually reopen. For example, the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) has developed a COVID-19 Action Plan for Returning Safely to Competition. The Joint Leadership Council (JLC), which consists of leaders from the American Hackney Horse Society, American Morgan Horse Association, American Road Horse & Pony Association, American Saddlebred Horse Association, Arabian Horse Association, United Professional Horsemen’s Association and the United States Equestrian Federation, has created guidelines for reopening barns. The American Paint Horse Association passed an emergency stimulus bill that included extending an extra year of eligibility for Novice Youth and Novice Amateurs, Youth in their last year of Walk-Trot, Youth 13 & Under and Youth 18 & Under, and Green classes, and modifying the requirements for Regional Club eligibility, due to limitations they might encounter due to event restrictions in 2020 due to COVID-19.

These are simply a handful of the ways organizations are working to help their members adapt to our current “normal”. True to its nature, the horse industry is working together to help everyone weather this storm.

Details: Contact Molly O’Brien at TTR@horsecouncil.org

Membership Spotlight

On Monday, April 27, 2020 we all took a break from the COVID-19 talk and learned about “Drones in the Equine Industry” from Allison Fultz, AHC member and Transportation Attorney in private practice in Washington, DC.  Allison gave a great practical overview of the rules governing drone flights in the US with issues relevant to the equine industry.  Allison gave an excellent presentation, including PowerPoint slides, current examples of drone interference with horses, and fielded questions from our viewers.  You can view the presentation here https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/vsl1F-H-_H9JW6-UtR_UcPdxMd24eaa80HRIrqcPz0zWac5yNwycySS9dtZ-xGIy

If you would like a copy of the PowerPoint presentation please contact info@horsecouncil.org.  If you have a topic relevant to the horse industry and would like to present please contact us at info@horsecouncil.org.

Our next topic is “From the Front Gate to the Back Fence: How to be Your own CEO”  by Scott Knudsen on Monday May 18, 2020 at 1pm EDT.  To register send an email to info@horsecouncil.org

Details: Contact Lynda Majerowicz at lmajerowicz@horsecouncil.org

Removing Chasity’s Shoes3

Chasity’s Challenges: Removing Chasity’s Shoes

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4-2-20:

Our farrier, Dean Geesen came out to take care of Chasity’s feet. The first order of business was to introduce himself with an offer of oats! She did not want my veterinarian, Greg Farrand, to pick up her feet on Tuesday, but during grooming on Wednesday, Ranch Manager, Chad and I cleaned her feet, so she was much more compliant today. Getting her hooves in balance will greatly improve her overall body balance. And, getting the shoes off her overgrown front feet will enable the frog to do its circulation job!

Her front hooves were exceptionally long with Borium shoes (non-slip) on them and her back feet were long and uneven. All four feet had been trimmed out of balance.

Dean showed us how the shoes had been abnormally and unevenly worn.

Dean removed the shoes and trimmed her hooves in the best balance that he could for now. Her hooves had been pressured to one side and would need several trims to get them properly symmetrical in alignment.

Dean is a correctional farrier and knew just what to do to get her started off on the right ‘foot’ so to speak. It was a definite improvement from where she was!

She will need to be checked periodically to keep her feet in good shape as she moves forward in her therapy. Sometimes these kinds of things just take time!

She was rewarded with oats in appreciation for her cooperation! Chasity seemed thankful for her newly balanced hooves.

Thank you! You GAVE and in a BIG Way to Make it a Big DAY!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

You GAVE in BIG Way!

We have all been so moved by your support of All About Equine this year. Through GivingTuesday and Big Day of Giving, 140 donors gave nearly $23,700 to help horses in need. We are so grateful you rose to the occasion. Your giving exceeded our expectations!With your help, we continue our work to help horses like Georgia, and sometimes their humans. Not long before COVID-19, Georgia’s family of five lost their home in a fire. After subsequent challenges with employment, rebuilding, temporary housing, and stay at home orders, they felt the best thing for Georgia would be a better life than they could give. She is scheduled for her dental next week. Her vaccines will be updated next week, and a microchip inserted. Once updated, she will be evaluated and available for adoption, soon.

We are so GRATEFUL for the love and support our community has shown AAE.

From the bottoms of our hearts,

Thank YOU!

Donate to Help

There is STILL time to GIVE!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

We Need You!

The Sacramento Region Community Foundation’s Big Day of Giving is TODAY!! This is still time to to take part in this community grown 24 hour giving challenge. A day to GIVE where your HEART is!

The horses of AAE have our hearts and we hope they have yours too!

Make a Difference Donate Today!

Remember Taylor?

Taylor came to AAE December of 2019. Taylor was rescued from a kill pen (by a private party) in July and taken to a board/care facility.  Only thing is, it seems her rescuer forgot to go back to take care of her. She never paid for her board/care, she never had her hooves trimmed, she never had her teeth checked and she never vaccinated her.

Taylor is an older TB mare (20-ish), about 15.1 hh, and an absolute sweetheart.

Her hoof and dental care were long neglected, though her hooves looked ok from the outside.  Her hooves were long, her bars and sole were much overgrown, and it was all stuck within her hoof walls.

She had her first trim shortly after arrival, she was vaccinated and dewormed, a microchip was placed, and her teeth were floated. She has a dental condition called “Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis” (EOTRH); however, radiographs indicated her teeth and jaw structure remain in relatively good, solid condition. Her tongue tends hangs out of her mouth a bit; it just adds a little more character to this sweet gal. As with all the horses at AAE, she continues her routine care is maintained while she is here

Taylor has had a tough life, and she really needs a soft landing, ideally into a companion home where she’ll be doted on and loved a lot.

Might you be her new family?

Visit Taylor’s Page

Taylor’s story is not unique and we hope you will help us to continue to change the lives of these animals…one horse at a time!

Help a Horse Today

If you can’t give today, please spread the word

Share our Posts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter!

Donate to Help

Your support is making all the difference

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Over the past couple of months, our nation has been tested, our spirits have been tried, and we’ve had to navigate what a new “normal” looks like.

During this difficult time, tens of thousands of you have continued to step up in a time of great uncertainty and peril to give a voice to the wild horses and burros who don’t have one.

This Tuesday was #GivingTuesdayNow, and truth be told, we didn’t know what to expect. We know that many of you aren’t in a position to give and that these are unprecedented times of struggle and heartache for so many.

But thousands of you shared our messages with friends and family and hundreds of you, from all across the country, chipped in what you could.


Not only did we reach our fundraising goal, which will allow us to replenish our foal rescue fund and support our work to save Wyoming’s horses (and so much more!), but you’ve also lifted our spirits.


Our staff and volunteers are incredibly grateful for your contributions to our work, especially now. You are the reason we can continue to do the work we do.

We wanted to share with you an important example of how your support is making a difference. This past month we had a powerful showing in defense of Wyoming’s wild horses during the Bureau of Land Management’s public comment period for their Wyoming Wild Horse Wipeout Plan.

Our policy counsel, Brieanah, was able to send off a jaw-dropping TWELVE-THOUSAND+ public comments from all across the nation in opposition to this cruel plan. Each of those names on every page, is a powerful testament to what we can accomplish when we stay committed, stay engaged, and work together.

From all of us here at AWHC, thank you for being a part of our herd. Stay healthy, stay safe, and stay hopeful. We will get through this together.

Donate

 

It’s Official, It’s Almost Here!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

Spread the Word! Big Day of Giving officially starts at Midnight!

Spread the Word! Big Day of Giving officially starts at Midnight!

HUGE THANK YOU to our friends, donors and volunteers who have supported All About Equine Animal Rescue, Inc. (AAE) as we all continue to adjust to the current circumstances. We are so THANKFUL to be a part of this giving community that continues makes a difference, even in a time of economic uncertainty.

In just a few hours we want you to partner with us as we officially start the 24 hour giving challenge known to the Sacramento region as the BIG Day of Giving!

Together during this community event lets Make a Difference and Help a Horse!

The need is always great, but during this time your support is more important than ever! Your donations assure our horses continue to receive the level of care they need and deserve.

All of our horses have a story, but only your continuing support ensures AAE can achieve our goal to help make those stories the best they can be.

We truly can’t do it without YOU!

Help a Horse this Big Day of Giving!

Did you know the Sacramento Region Community Foundation gives away prizes during the Big Day of Giving??

This Big Day of Giving every donation has a chance to make an even bigger difference with a booster prize! The Sacramento Region Community Foundation will select random donations throughout the Big Day of Giving to BOOST with some extra love! Boosts will range from $150-750! Help AAE with a BOOST! Your donation could be the one that makes an even bigger difference to the horses at AAE!

SPECIAL PROMOTION: Donate $150 or more and receive a gift certificate redeemable towards vintage AAE merchandise. Promotion ends 11:59 pm on May 7th!

Not only do we need your support, we need your help to spread the word #BDOG2020

Share our Posts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

Here are more ways you can help!

Make a Donation Today!

SPECIAL PROMOTION: Donate $150 or more and receive a gift certificate redeemable towards vintage AAE merchandise. Promotion ends 11:59 pm on May 7th!

Become a Horse Sponsor!

Our Sponsor a Horse program is a monthly donation for a specific horse. You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Donate Tack!

Doing some spring cleaning? Donate gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g.clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales helps pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Adopt a Horse!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse? If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete the Adoption Inquiry Form.

Check out our current horses

Thank you for being a part of the All About Equine Animal Rescue team.

Hope you stay healthy and safe.

 

Together We Can Do Extraordinary Things!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

In this time of uncertainty, there’s a fundamental truth that gives us hope – that together we can do extraordinary things!

Over the past few weeks and months, the entire world has been coming together to stand up, help out, give back, and heal. Whether that’s through donations to community organizations, celebrating doctors and nurses at shift changes, or reaching out to a neighbor to help with groceries, generosity has been helping the entire world get through this global pandemic. Together.

Today, May 5, 2020, All About Equine Animal Rescue, Inc.(AAE) is participating in #GivingTuesdayNow, a global day of unity and giving. As you know, the specific charitable purposes of AAE are to rescue and rehabilitate abused, neglected, abandoned, unwanted, and/or slaughter-bound animals, primarily equines (wild and domestic); to provide animals with food, shelter, care and handling; and veterinary care, as needed; to utilize a strategic process for matching healthy, rehabilitated animals with compatible, loving, and permanent adoptive homes; to provide long term care for unadoptable animals; and to educate the community about abused, neglected, abandoned, unwanted, and/or slaughter-bound animals, primarily equines.

But we can’t do this without you!

Not only do we need your support, we need your help to spread the word.

Share our Posts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter!

Tell your friends and family why you believe in our work & encourage them to support us too! 

Join the #GivingTuesdayNow Movement Today!

Here are more ways you can help!

Make a Donation Today!

SPECIAL PROMOTION: Donate $150 or more and receive a gift certificate redeemable towards vintage AAE merchandise. Promotion ends 11:59 pm on May 7th!

Become a Horse Sponsor!

Our Sponsor a Horse program is a monthly donation for a specific horse. You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Donate Tack!

Doing some spring cleaning? Donate gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g.clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales helps pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Adopt a Horse!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse? If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete the Adoption Inquiry Form.

Check out our current horses

Thank you for being a part of the All About Equine Animal Rescue team.

Hope you stay healthy and safe.

Donate today and help save a foal’s life (match expires TONIGHT!)

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

As many of you know, we’re in the midst of foaling season. That’s when pregnant mares welcome the newest additions to their families and herds to the world.

But with the excitement of welcoming a new life into the world comes risk and danger.

With AWHC volunteer fertility control darters in the field every day in Nevada’s Virginia Range, our team is often the first responder to foals in need. Working through a local coalition of organizations, orphaned and injured foals are rescued, stabilized, provided veterinary care, and nursed back to health so they can be adopted into forever homes.

For the last several years, AWHC has been proud to support the local effort through our foal rescue fund. This year, we’re providing foal rescue kits to rescue volunteers so they have everything they need to save these innocent babies’ lives. Our rescue fund also assists with veterinary bills, care and transportation of foals to sanctuary/training facilities.

This #GivingTuesdayNow I’m personally asking if you will make a matched donation of $20.20 or more to help purchase foal rescue kits and provide other support for volunteers to use in the 2020 foaling season — happening now. By donating, you double the resources available to save these precious foals.

Our foal kits are small, compact, easy to carry into the field — Because when a foal is hurt, the difference between recovery and not making it can be a matter of hours, if not minutes.

Inside each are essential emergency supplies, including but not limited to: disinfectant, colostrum (formula) and electrolytes to help stabilize the foal, bandages to cover any exposed wounds, blankets for foals in shock or for transport, and medical equipment in the event volunteers need to perform life-saving care.

These kits have all the things we need in a really organized way. We can bandage [foals] up quickly and prepare to get them to a vet ASAP. Before we had these kits, my bags were a mish-mash [of supplies]. I would have to dump everything out on the range to find what I needed, these kits make it easy and it’s really great for our entire team, especially when time is not on our side.”

– Tracy Wilson, rescue volunteer & member of AWHC fertility control team


The local volunteers work incredibly hard. And I want to ensure this foaling season that they have every resource at their disposal when crisis strikes so they can save these foals and get them the care they need to heal, recover, and find their forever homes.

That’s why, as important as it is for us to hit tonight’s fundraising goal, I am writing to you asking if you will give $20.20 or more, if you are in a position to do so, so we can keep the foal rescue kits stocked and ready to go. If you give before midnight, your impact will be doubled.

Donate (2x!)

 

NO horse should ever be subjected to this

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The only “crime” wild horses have committed is being born wild. With a fair resource allocation, our public lands could easily support the existing wild horse population — and claims to the contrary are being promoted by the livestock industry, which has everything to gain from the horses’ elimination.

NO wild horse should be cruelly stampeded by helicopters, trapped and sent to crowded holding pens.

NO mare should have her ovaries barbarically removed through an outdated surgical procedure that has been condemned by veterinarians, animal protection groups, and scientists.

NO foal should be separated from his or her family and sold off in auctions, sometimes for as little as $1 (in the case of horses removed from Forest Service land).

AWHC is fighting to make sure that wild horses and burros are protected. And we’re getting results — we’ve delayed roundups and proven that they are unnecessary with our model fertility control program. We’ve prevented the BLM from conducting dangerous and inhumane sterilization surgeries that would endanger individual horses and threaten wild herds. We’re currently fighting to stop the BLM from rounding up 3,000 wild horses in Wyoming and to prevent the Forest Service’s ‘horse dumping’ policy.

When you donate today and tomorrow, you DOUBLE the resources available to our team to continue to give wild horses a FIGHTING voice. They don’t have a voice, so we have to use ours.

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

Donate (2x!)

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