Monthly Archive for: ‘October, 2019’

The greatest threat to wild horses in our lifetimes

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

William Perry Pendley, the Acting Director of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced this week that it would cost the taxpayers $5,000,000,000.00 to clear public lands of wild horses.

Pendley knows exactly what he’s doing. By putting an outrageously high price tag on humane management of wild horses and burros, he’s laying the groundwork to make the case that non-lethal management of wild horses is too expensive and that slaughter is the only option.

The threat of slaughter is again looming large. If you can spare a donation to AWHC, now is the time to do so.

Just last week, Pendley labeled wild horses an “existential threat” to public lands in America, even though wild horses aren’t even present on 88% of BLM lands.

Pendley’s goal is to divert attention away from the commercial industries, including livestock grazing, that are the true “existential” threats to public lands, while simultaneously securing funding from Congress for unprecedented mass wild horse and burro roundups.

Pendley is executing a sophisticated propaganda campaign against wild horses. Phase 1 was to establish a fake crisis of wild horse overpopulation. That has largely been achieved with the HSUS, ASPCA and Return to Freedom capitulation to the livestock industry agenda of reducing wild horse and burro populations to near extinction levels.

Phase 2, to convince Congress that non-lethal management of wild horses is too expensive, is now underway.

This represents the greatest threat to the survival of wild horses and could result in their extinction. We need to organize and fight back like never before.

That’s why we’re asking each of you, if possible, to make a donation to support our work. Every single donation helps us send a message to Congress and Pendley: We will not let you exterminate wild horses!

This won’t be an easy fight — Which is why we are so grateful for your support at this critical time.

Thank you,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

Donate

 

HEADING BACK TO WA – MORE BABIES AT THE FEED LOT – CHILLY PEPPER NEEDS YOUR HELP NOW!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

ANOTHER MIRACLE BABY – MEET LITTLE MAX, AND HIS MAMA WHO REJECTED HIM.

They just keep coming. All the horses in the last batch have been savedLuckily another rescue stepped up and helped fund raise and there is only one left at this time. We are slated to bring him home if he does not get adopted in the next few hours. Sadly, between his fees and Coggins etc., we will need another $750 just to save him, and that does not include the additional babies..

It cost $6027 ($1400 to save the horses and the rest for Coggins and Health Certs and to get the emergency vet care for our gentle giant and the tiny Max. Big Matt had a bad case of colic, and Little Matt was on his way to a certain death. In addition, one of the horses I am bringing home on this next trip needed emergency vet care yesterday for an infected hoof. So that pretty much wiped out the coffers. We try to do as much of the vetting as we can, but sometimes you have to bite the bullet and save the lives God puts in front of youSo we need more help now! I have to get to WA, so we can save the 4 babies waiting at the feed lot. Then those horses have to get vetted and we have to get back home.

THE MIRACLE OF MAX-AMILLION

I received the call for MAX, hours after he was born. His Mama absolutely refused to have anything to do with him and shoved him into a water tank. So this newborn (probably a preemie) ended up with no care, a Mama bent on hurting him, and wet and frozen cold out in the freezing winds. It was a horrific way for a tiny baby to begin life.

I was told that he was given colostrum. He couldn’t really swallow, and had no suckling reflex whatsoever. It took forever to get even tiny amounts of milk down him. The next morning we had the vet check him. Everything seemed fine.

That afternoon little Max was unconscious.. We gave him glucose and Mel worked on waking him up. When he came back to, he sat up and drank his milk like nothing had happened. I was pretty sure we had turned a corner, but that little voice said take him to WSU – the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. It was 4 hours away and I was exhausted and dreading the drive, but I knew God was telling us to go. THANKFULLY WE DID! Max-amillion had zero Passive Transfer, which means he had no colostrum. Not enough to even register. He has pneumonia, fluid around his lungs from the pneumonia, and he would have died for sure.

Between the vet bills for Big Matt and Little Max-amillion, and the funds spent purchasing the rescued horses, we simply need to recharge our funds. We need to get the rest of the kids and bring them home. I was told several are still needing milk, although I have yet to see them,

THANK YOU to everyone who made all this possible. Please let’s finish this long rescue and get these babies to safety.

MAX says, THANK YOU FOR SAVING MY LIFE AND MY MAMA TOO, even if she doesn’t want me.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

550+ wild horses removed from public lands in Wyoming [contains photos from the scene]

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

As we speak, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is forcibly reducing the population of wild horses in Wyoming’s Fifteenmile Herd Management Area (HMA) by 86% through a helicopter stampede.

So far, they’ve removed 558 wild horses from the area — With the goal of capturing nearly 700 wild horses before the end of the month.

Those wild horses don’t have a voice, so we have to use ours — we have to take action to defend them. Every donation helps us keep the public informed about these cruel roundups and allows us to advocate for the tens of thousands of wild horses and burros across the West.

This week, our observer was in Wyoming’s Fifteenmile HMA, where the BLM is currently rounding up the entirety of the wild horse population there from our public lands. At least 8 horses have died in the week since the roundup began, including:

  • One horse succumbed to a neck injury during the helicopter stampede while two others were euthanized;
  • Another died as a result of a strike to the head by another wild horse on the way to the trap;
  • One mare had a major cut and was taken to Rock Springs for treatment;
  • Despite BLM reports that wild horses are “starving” to justify these roundups, the wild horses being removed are in good body condition and sound health.

After the BLM breaks apart their families, only 100 wild horses will be returned to the area, threatening the long term survival of the herd itself.

This is not an isolated incident, either. If Congress authorizes the new BLM ten-year plan, we will witness roundups of this scale all throughout the West — Putting wild horses and burros squarely on the path to extinction.

We are the eyes and ears on the ground, holding BLM accountable for these cruel roundups. Please donate to help our team continue to document roundups and work to ramp up the pressure on Congress to reject the BLM’s “path to extinction” plan.

Thank you for your continued support — We’ll keep you updated.

Sincerely,

The AWHC Team

Donate

Fifteenmile Roundup would reduce local wild horse population by 86% (!)

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

Over the next two weeks, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will attempt to forcibly rip away nearly 700 wild horses in Wyoming from the Fifteenmile Herd Management Area (HMA), returning just 100 back into the wild.

For reference, that amounts to removing a staggering 86% of the entire wild horse population in the HMA.

This might sound blunt but: If you can, we need you to make a donation now to help AWHC keep our team in the field documenting these roundups and defending wild horses and burros against the most pressing threat of our generation.

We want to make this abundantly clear and transparent: Your support allows us to document these cruel operations so the public is informed, challenge the roundups when possible before they happen in Congress and in the courts, as well as fund our field programs where we PROVE that there is a better, more humane way to manage wild horses and burros.

The BLM wants to complete the Fifteenmile Roundup before the end of October if possible.

By the time the helicopters have cleared the area, as few as 100 wild horses could remain in the Fifteenmile HMA, which spans more than 70,000 acres. That is below the number of wild horses needed to maintain genetic viability.

Simply put, the Fifteenmile Roundup threatens to end the wild horse population in this area once and for all. And this is just the beginning of what is to come if Congress approves the BLM plan which would remove tens of thousands of wild horses throughout the West over the next ten years.

Time isn’t on our side. Help us continue to shine a spotlight on these cruel roundups and defend our wild horses and burros by rushing in a donation of any size →

Your support is making all the difference,

The AWHC Team

Donate

Juging Show0007CC

MULE CROSSING: Organizing a Show

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By Meredith Hodges

Organizing an equine show is certainly no easy task, and it is certain that there will be problems to deal with along the way, but these problems do not need to be monumental if the people who are organizing the show clearly know the parameters of their particular jobs. It is also important that exhibitors know these duties, so that they can contact the proper person if a problem arises.

Organization of a show begins with the show management committee who is responsible for the detailing of the show. Of this committee, there is usually a designated chairman in charge, or show manager. The duty of the show manager is to assign specific duties and delegate authority to others connected with the show. He is the coordinator of the show and will only make decisions that cannot be made by other designated show officials. It is his duty to see that other show officials are doing a thorough job with their duties. The show manager may elect to have an assistant to help him with his many different duties.

The show secretary is responsible for taking minutes of all show committee meetings and often acts as liaison to the show manager. It is the secretary’s duty to see to it that mailing lists are complete and potential exhibitors are notified of the impending show and are kept up to date. The secretary checks the public relations work done on the show by the public relations person, and in some cases, assumes this duty himself. The secretary records entries and receives funds sent in by exhibitors. Any program changes, protests, etc. are recorded by the secretary. The secretary is responsible for recording show results and mailing them to appropriate recipients, and to see that the results are released to the public in a timely fashion. The treasurer is responsible for handling and depositing funds used for the show and often aids the secretary in his duties. It is the treasurer’s duty to see to it that all expenses for the show are accounted for and paid and that a detailed report of such is given to the secretary.

Judges are selected by the show committee and are paid for their expert opinion. Judges should be briefed by the show secretary as to the duties they will be expected to perform which sometimes may include designing courses for the competitions. A set of rules should be sent to the judge well in advance of the competition to allow for any questions that might need to be answered. The judge should not be asked to interpret the rules. Rules should be made clear enough that he can make his decisions easily, which are in turn deemed final. Judges are given the power to combine, or split classes where appropriate. The judge should not socialize with exhibitors until the competition is over to preserve his objectivity and integrity. When time permits, the judge should give reasons for his decisions to give credence to his choices and to help exhibitors learn. The judge should be knowledgeable, congenial and professional about his duties.

The ring steward, or judge’s aid, has many varied duties. First and foremost, it is his duty to see to it that exhibitors adhere to the rules of the competition. It is his duty to interpret the use of the rules and not the duty of the judge. The ring steward is responsible for listening to and reporting complaints or protests. Although he has no authority in connection with the management or the judging of a competition, he should point out in a diplomatic manner any instance where rules are not being adhered to and report any violations to officials.

He needs to be available to judges, officials and exhibitors at all times. He is to supervise and record any timeouts for tack changes or equipment breakage, and to measure animals where required. He is to conduct the breaking of ties in classes and to deliver the judge’s decisions to reporting officials. The ring steward is responsible for all medication forms, reports, and testing, with the aid of the secretary and the veterinarian. He is responsible for the accuracy of competition lists of entries and their class placements as reported by the judge and is to see to it that completed lists are given to the show secretary. The ring steward should protect the interests of the exhibitors as well as the integrity of the show. The ring steward should see that the competition moves along in a timely fashion. He, with his various duties, is a key entity for the success of the show.

Scorekeepers and timers are used to record scores and times for specific classes and should be equipped with the proper tools to facilitate their jobs. Flags, stopwatches, time sheets, calculators, and writing utensils are necessary items. Scorekeepers should be prepared to keep times and scores updated continually so that championship classes can be announced quickly and easily.

The announcer is a very important component of any show. He must be able to speak clearly and audibly, to know the general rules and regulations for the show and should be creative enough to keep the spectators engaged throughout the entire show. He needs to be able to spot exhibitors and know their names from the exhibitor numbers displayed on their backs or on their animals. The announcer needs to be able to accurately pronounce the winners of each class as per the judge’s sheet provided by the Ring Steward. It really helps if he has that “announcer’s voice” and is an animated character!

To assist on the arena floor during class changes, there should be a ground crew available. It is the duty of the ground crew to see to it that the arena is in good repair, dragged and fluffed when necessary, and that the obstacles for specific classes are placed and removed when needed. In over-fences classes, the ground crew may be asked to reset jumps. In gymkhana classes, they are required to reset poles, flags, barrels, etc. It is the responsibility of the ground crew to see to it that obstacles and such are stored properly after the competition and that donated articles are returned to their owners. The ground crew can also be asked to assist in the stabling area hauling manure, delivering bedding, finding stall assignments, or any other related duties. Keeping warm-up arenas ready and working are also the responsibility of the ground crew. There may be a stable manager, but he is usually responsible for receiving stabling forms and arranging stabling assignments, bedding requests and other related clerical duties. The stable manager also oversees the maintenance and work of the ground crew in the stable area.

Parking Attendants and Stable Managers should be used when necessary to assist exhibitors in loading and unloading, and in the parking of their trucks and trailers. They can make the difference when it comes to traffic congestion at the show. Parking attendants may also be requested to take note of the owner’s vehicles, so that they may be notified quickly in the event of an emergency with their vehicles. This can help prevent theft or vandalism. The Stable Manager sees that each animal is efficiently unloaded from the trailer and is escorted to his respective stall. If the show is providing hay, he will make sure each exhibitor has as much hay as they need and that any other needs are provided. Newt Elsdon was the model Stable Manager and Show Committee member for the Bishop Mule Days Celebration for many years.

Last, but certainly not least, are the show veterinarian and farrier whose expertise are to be used for emergency show situations. An exhibitor should not expect to use their services for regular maintenance at the show unless pre-arranged. Veterinarians and farriers should be booked well in advance of the show to allow for their busy schedules. Alternates should also be booked and at the show, their areas should be clearly marked and they should be easy to locate.

Organizing a show is a tremendous job, but when duties are outlined clearly, things will run as smoothly as can be expected for any such event. There are probably some things I have forgotten to mention–there is so much to consider, but I hope I have outlined a general idea of what duties to expect from what show committee members. Our mule and donkey shows are constantly improving thanks to conscientious and enthusiastic organizers in our show committees. Hats off to you all!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1993, 2016, 2019 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

California just took a historic step to protect wild horses and burros (!)

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

In 2018 alone, nearly 80,000 American horses, both wild and domestic, were taken to Canada or Mexico and slaughtered for human consumption.

That’s why AWHC sponsored Assembly Bill 128 (AB 128) in California — legislation to strengthen protections for horses from slaughter to help put a stop to this. AB 128 was authored by California State Assemblymember Todd Gloria (CA AD-78) in order to “make sure California’s horse population is not illegally sent to slaughter [by closing] a loophole that could lead horses to harm.”

We’re proud to tell you that all of our collective phone calls, petitions, and organizing worked: AB 128 was officially signed into law last weekend by California Governor Gavin Newsom!

The passage of AB 128 is proof that when we raise our voices and work hard, we can achieve victories on behalf of America’s wild horses and burros. Help us build on this momentum at a time when the U.S. Senate is considering a bill that would put wild horses on the path to extinction by making a donation.

Thank you for your continued support,

American Wild Horse Campaign

Donate

ANOTHER 911 – A NEW RESCUE IN THE MIDDLE OF THIS ONE! SO FAR 8 & MAYBE MORE??? CLOCK IS TICKING AS ALWAYS.

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

ANOTHER 911 CALL! They just do not stop in our world.

2 More wild babies at the shipper’s so far, (and most likely more to come!) Folks have seen multiple “traps” that are currently full of wild horses, right now, today!

We received an urgent call for a group of kids that are shipping in a few days? 6 Domestics, 3 more older, “gentle giants”, who were purportedly driving horses, and 3 older saddle horses. All of these horses worked their lives away, and now that they are no longer needed, they have been thrown in the trash.

Let’s show them that timing aside, no matter what time of year, their lives DO matter! Rescue is never convenient, and this is the worst time of year to be taking on more horses. However, their lives ALWAYS matter, even if it is freezing outside and it takes tremendous amounts of work to care for them.

We will save as many as we can get funding for. But this means being responsible and knowing we have enough money to not only “buy them”, but to vet them, transport them and feed and care for them properly through the winter months, or until we can get them adopted.

So it will be up to y’all, as always. YOU decide how many more we can save. Y’all are amazing, but we simply cannot do this without you. We are exhausted, but we had to put it out there and give these guys a chance.

Big Matt was colicking the 2nd night we got him. He is a hot mess, and needs lots of prayers. His heart rate was double what it should have been and the vet was very concerned. Sadly, he is a very long way from being “out of the woods’. We are hoping and praying his new drug protocol will provide comfort and not too many side effects.

We have already spent a fortune on him, but he needs as much help as we can give him. At this time, he cannot seem to lie down. A horse HAS to be able to lie down, or it will be a death sentence. He is exhausted and when he tried to lay down, he got half way down, and it was too hard for him. He started moaning, and then finally stood back up. Vet has him starting on some good meds, so we will see if we can make him comfortable and give him a good quality of life.

Can you imagine weighing 1900 pounds, your feet and legs hurting, and not being able to lie down to rest and get off of them? We HAVE TO MAKE SURE his quality of life is one that he deserves! Horses also need to sleep. :(

We will be heading home with this current group of kids tomorrow. How many we will be able to pick up when we come back depends on you. Please help us save and take care of as many as possible.

We are also praying other folks will step up and help these horses, but for now, all we can do is try and save as many as we can.

Thank you as always for your miracles and your prayers!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

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How a Sturdy Mule Triumphed Over 198 Champion Horses in the Great American Horse Race of 1976

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We hope you enjoy this intriguing and inspiring article that was submitted by one of our contributing writers, Tara Edwards, Trimepil:

Leroy (left), Virl Norton and Lady Eloise pose for a photo. Photo courtesy of Quicksilver Endurance Riders.

Sometimes, miracles do happen. Such was the case in the not so distant 1976, when a proper underdog proved to be better than the competition. The competition being over 198 champion horses who were gunning for the title. A simple mule came out on top when put against some of the most treasured horses from all over the world.

But was this outcome truly miraculous, or was it a result of something else? Could this result be predicted? Let’s find out.

The Setup

In the days when America enjoyed their two hundred years of independence, the beauties of the country were put on display. Simple celebration of the country and its treasures wasn’t quite enough though, because patriotism reached its peak and had to be expressed properly. This lead to the organization of a few very interesting and unique events. One of these events, or setups was the Freedom Train. This train was practically a museum which moved along on the railways. It went through 48 states on its journey across the state, allowing millions of people to see it and enjoy its presentation. Another kind of event that took place often in these times were nautical parades. Some of the most fascinating and biggest ships, along with their smaller partners set out and traveled along the coastline, all the while carrying large patriotic flags. Love for the country and its freedom didn’t end there, every company that could, tried their best to express their unwavering loyalty to the flag. Railroad companies decided to paint their entire trains into red, white and blue so that state flags could go all around the railroads, bringing joy to any who see them.

Amidst all this commotion, a competitive event took place. One which allowed anyone with a couple of horses, $500, and a resolute adventurous spirit to try their luck. The Great American Horse Race, as it was called, was brought to life by a pair of horse loving salesmen, Chuck Waggoner and Randy Scheiding. The prize was pretty generous, reaching $25,000, but that wasn’t the greatest motivation for most competitors. This was a chance to prove the worth of a horse, and to gain fame and reputation. But to achieve that, one would have to travel 3,500 miles over fourteen weeks across America on the back of their trustworthy steed. Some of the trails the contestants would experience were the Oregon Trail, the Pony Express Trail, and the Donner Party’s doomed journey. This journey presented a unique possibility to get familiar with the wild beauty of 13 states up close while enjoying a bit of healthy rivalry against the opponents.

The Competition

This race turned out to be very appealing and fascinating, attracting people from all over the world, not just America. Such a result wasn’t surprising though, because this competition was in fact a chance for horse breeders of all sorts to demonstrate their horse’s worth, beauty and uniqueness. Over 90 teams applied (each allowed two horses), most of them hoping and believing they will prove that their horse was indeed, the best of the best.

Of course, some were in it just for fun, having entered without much hope of winning. Others were really serious about the race, bringing treasured horses with great heritage behind them. From 18 year old singer, to 69 year old horse trader, with pediatricians, students, cowboys, nurses, and at least one university president, they all tried their luck on this race.

The only Russian Orlov stallion in America, called Nature’s Ballet, descendant from a horse that belonged to Nikita Kruschev entered the race, being ridden by one Californian. Iceland  sent over ten Viking high born horses to compete, but only after they had altitude training in San Francisco. France sent over a dozen horsemen dressed like Marquis Lafayette’s soldiers. Competition came from Australia, Denmark and even Japan, all believing that their horses would came out on top.

The Feat

One contestant was a bit different than the rest because he did not come with horses that were high born or had great descendants. All rides were allowed to enter the race with two horses, one being a backup horse in case the main steed couldn’t ride anymore. Virl Norton, a 54 year old steeplejack from San Jose, California, decided that both of his horses would be his loyal mules. He considered them precious just as much as any other contestant considered their horse to be special. With great confidence, he entered the race strongly believing that his mules were the most adequate choice for this exhausting long race. Norton was a kind hearted man, with no grudges with the other competitors. A few days before the race, he gave his second mount, Deacon, to a contestant whose horse got injured.

The race was unbelievably demanding, burning through 18,000 horseshoes in total. Despite the slow pace and the obligatory vet checks every 10 miles, some of the main mounts went lame and were swapped for the backups. Some of the backups also went lame.

Most riders considered Norton an honorable man because he wouldn’t think twice about helping other contestants when they had troubles. He let people take photos with his mule Leeroy and he’d make up the time lost by skipping water stops. Leeroy was considered a puppy dog mule due to his calm temper and composure. After some time, Norton’s backup mule Lady Eloise suffered an injury and had to withdraw from race, but Leeroy and Norton kept riding, taking it slow and easy during their journey.

Norton was the 31st rider to pass the finish line, but that didn’t mean he was far from victory. In fact, Leeroy even flapped his ears as they reached the goal, celebrating their success long before the results came out. After the judges calculated the total score of all contestants by measuring their riding time and applying the penalties, the winner was declared. Norton and Leeroy came out on top with 315.47 hours in the saddle, ahead of an Arabian in second place with 324.6 hours riding time. Top ten horses were basically show steeds, with two exceptions, Leeroy and Deacon, who were mules.

Norton wasn’t surprised by this result, stating that the other horses had no chance against his mules. He took the grand prize and henceforth called himself The Great American Horseman. Lord Fauntleroy, which was Leeroy’s full name, was known as The Great American Horse after that.

Sometimes the underdog is in fact the favorite, but only they know that. Norton and Leeroy proved that.

Links:

Place Your Bids While There is Still Time!!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

THANK YOU for all of the GREAT THINGS you do to make it possible to help so many horses!

It’s auction time!  All About Equine’s Second Chance Auction is live on our Facebook page.
Like our horses, these items are in need of a new home and a second chance!
We hope you will find something you can’t live without, so help the horses by bidding!  All the proceeds from the online auction go directly to care for horses and ongoing operations at AAE!
We are so grateful to all of our donors for providing AAE with these items to feature!
If you have an item you’d like to donate and be featured in one of our online auctions,
please contact dani@allaboutequine.org.
THANK YOU!

Our current 2nd Chance Online Auction is open!  

 

Check out all our items!! 

 
Featured Items Closing 10/24/19!!! 
Get your Bids in Now!!
Sterling Silver Vintage Tabra Connector Necklace with 3 connector charms. The Tabra sterling silver half round dragon link necklace chain (16 inches) connects with the charms. There are 3 interchangeable connector charms included: Silver & bronze connector charm with faceted peridot in center (measures 1 1/4 inch), Heart shaped onyx in a sterling silver connector charm (measures 1 inch) and Sterling silver swirl connector charm. All charms have Tabra signature and chain is stamped.
Value $900 (R$)
Starting Bid: $350 
 

Be the First to Bid!!

Thank you, Sandy E.
The Body Glove PFD (personal flotation device) is Type III US Coast Guard Approved. Features, UTAK lining with smooth surface for ultra comfort, Outer shell made with Yamamoto Bio Rubber (ultra durable and environmentally friendly, Anatomically cut with overlock stitching. This is like-new condition. Evoprene PFD Life Vest, Women’s size X-Large.
Value $45
Starting Bid:  $20 
 
Be the First to Bid!!
Thank you, Gaylon & Alayne B!
The Body Glove PFD (personal flotation device) is Type III US Coast Guard Approved. Features, UTAK lining with smooth surface for ultra comfort, Outer shell made with Yamamoto Bio Rubber (ultra durable and environmentally friendly, Anatomically cut with overlock stitching. This is like-new condition. Evoprene PFD Life Vest, Women’s size Large.
Value $45
Starting Bid:  $20 
 
Be the First to Bid!!
 
Thank you, Gaylon & Alayne B!
Matching Headstall and Breast Collar
Flashy Showman Leather Headstall and Breast Collar set. New with tag. Stamped leather with Green, Pink, Yellow, Blank and White beading, and black leather inlay. Average horse size and adjustable.
Value: $85
Starting Bid: $40
Be the First to Bid!!
 
Thank you for donating to AAE!

TwinStar 50mm Beginner Compact Refractor Telescope with Tabletop Tripod. Great for Kids! Easy to assemble with a 50mm objective lens and short 300mm focal length, this tiny beast will give you magnifications of 15x and 24x with the included 20mm and 12.5mm eyepieces. Includes storage backpack, lens cover and study storage containers for eye pieces.

Value: $50
Current Bid:  $30 
Thank you, Gaylon & Alayne B!

Beautiful and unique handcrafted bracelet.

Value: $65
Starting Bid: $30 
 
Be the First to Bid!!
Thank you, Donna N.!
Brown Fringe Fashion Satchel. Large interior pocket (zipper top) with small zip change pocket. One external zip pocket. All zippers function. Great fashion piece, clean inside and out.
Value: $40
Starting Bid: $15 
 
Be the First to Bid!!
Thank you for donating to AAE!
O’Neill Women’s Reactor 2mm Short Sleeve Back Zip Spring Wetsuit: Size 12
Quick-drying fabric provides for a great wear. Flatlock seams reduce chafing and improve durability. 2MM thickness. Seamless paddle zones. Chafe-resistant mock collar. Zippered back closure. Internal key pocket. O’Neill brand markings throughout. 100% polyester; All panels are bonded to neoprene. Hand wash, drip dry. Barely used.
Value: $100
Current Bid:  $45
 
Thank you, Gaylon & Alayne B!

Help Us With Our New Fencing!

We need help finishing our fencing project at the new property.
If we can get the south portion of the fencing done,
we can move some horses onto the new property and
rotate them in the big pasture area
before the new grass grows.
  
Can you please help?
We really need to get this done, soon.
  
We have a post hole day with the tractor.
Dick and Wendy will be out, and we need the help of at least a couple people
able to help with setting the posts in concrete (lifting bags of concrete).
We have a small trailer we can drive around the fenceline with the posts, concrete, and water.
November 2, 2019 – 9a to noon-ish (or until we get done)
Additional days for tackling more t-posts.  We are nearly done with the south end of the property
Friday, Oct 18th 8am-12pm
Sunday, Oct 20th 1pm-5pm
Thursday, Oct 24th 8am-12pm
Friday, Oct 25th 8am-12pm
Sunday, Oct 27th, 1pm-5pm
Thursday, Oct 31st 8am-12pm
Friday, Nov 1st, 8am-12pm
Saturday, Nov 2nd, 9am-12pm (post-setting)
Sunday, Nov 3rd 1pm-5pm
We have two power drivers for the t-posts.
 
Once we can get the t-posts done in the remaining areas, and the posts set, we can start hanging wire.
How exciting it will be to get this done!!!  We are close!
Everyone is welcome to join us!
If you are able to help with any of the dates above, please contact jean@allaboutequine.org.
Jean is helping coordinate the fence building mission.
Please help if you can!!
New Volunteer Needs
As many of you know, we’ve been trying to expand store hours.
TACK STORE SUPPORT:
We need a second person to help staff the store on Tuesday, Wednesday, and/or Thursday afternoons, 2p-6p.
If you’re interested in helping with tack store activities (e.g. cleaning donated tack, researching/pricing, organizing),
we need you.  Current store hours are Fri-Mon 12-4p, and we could use help during any of those hours, too.
Please contact wendy@allaboutequine.org if you are interested/available Tues, Wed, or Thurs afternoons, 2p-6p.
  

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT:

If you are available to help with administrative activities, we are creating admin hours in the office at the store.
We have a variety of administrative tasks we need help getting done.
Please contact wendy@allaboutequine.org if you are interested/available Tues, Wed, or Thurs afternoons, 2p-6p.

BOOTS & BLING 2020

We have kicked off our Boots & Bling planning for 2020.
The event has included a catered BBQ Dinner, DJ Music, Live/Silent/Dessert auctions,
a special fundraiser, and line dancing with instruction.
We need help in most areas for planning for this event to make sure its a huge success for AAE and our horses.
Please contact  wendy@allaboutequine.org if you are interested in helping with Boots & Bling.
We meet once a month until the event.
    

SPECIAL PROJECTS AROUND THE BARN

Maybe you’d like to help around the barn, but don’t want to work directly with the horses, or you don’t like to muck?
We could use some help cleaning and organizing, whether it’s the feed room, the meds room, the office, the tools, groundskeeping, painting shelters, monitoring the fencelines, tree trimming, coordinating vehicle maintenance, or a zillion other things.
There’s so much that needs to be done, and
we could use some extra hands to help keep things looking nicer and more clean.
Please contact wendy@allaboutequine.org if you are interested/available during regular barn shifts,
Mon-Sat 8a-noon, Sun 9a-1p or afternoons 3p-6p.
  

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED NOW!!

 
Do you have four hours a week to give to support horses in need?

Daily Horse Care, especially pm shifts needed now
(Daily 8a-12p or 3p-6p)
Used Tack Store Support, all areas 
(Fri – Mon, 12-4p)
Barn/Facility Maintenance
Foster Homes, Long-Term Foster/Sanctuary Homes
Capital Campaign Support
Board Members
Fundraising/Events
Grants – Writing and Research
Volunteer, Project, and Activity Coordinators
Outreach Activities
Youth Programs
Therapy Programs
Veteran Programs
Special Projects
Admin Support
Marketing
Graphics
Social Media
Bloggers
Photographers
Media and/or Photo Librarian
More, more, more
Interested in volunteering or volunteering in other areas?

Employers Match Donations, Does Yours?

Hey volunteers!
Did you know YOU could earn grant money for AAE from your employer just by volunteering?
Many Employers offer money when their employees volunteer.  Here are a few examples:
  • Intel

    provides a $10 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $5,000 per employee or retiree.

  • Microsoft provides a $17 grant to a nonprofit per every hour volunteered by an employee.
  • Apple provides a $25 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $10,000 per employee.
  • Verizon provides a $750 grant to a nonprofit when an employee volunteers for 50+ hours.
  • State Farm provides a $500 grant nonprofit when an employee volunteers for+ 40 hours.
  • Others top 20 matching gift and/or volunteer grant companies include
    • Starbucks 
    • CarMax
    • Home Depot 
    • JP Morgan
    • Chevron
    • Soros Fund Management 
    • BP (British Petroleum)
    • Gap Corporation
    • State Street Corporation 
    • ExxonMobil
    • Johnson & Johnson
    • Boeing
    • Disney
    • Google
    • Merck
    • Aetna
    • Dell
    • Outerwall (CoinStar and RedBox) 
    • ConocoPhillips
    • RealNetworks
    • Time Warner and subsidiaries
    • AllState
    • and more
Check with your employer.  You could help purchase our next load of hay!

BREAKING: BLM Director labels wild horses “existential threat” to public lands

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

The Acting Bureau of Land Management Director, William Perry Pendley, just went on record to single out wild horses as the biggest “existential threat” to public lands.

No, we’re not joking:

Wild horses and burros are “an existential threat to these lands. They are causing havoc on the land.” --  William Perry Pendley

The irony of his comments is not lost on us. Almost 90 percent of BLM land has NO wild horses on it, and mustangs have nowhere near as large an environmental footprint as commercial livestock grazing. Pendley himself championed the cause of selling off our public lands into private ownership, for profit. That position is the real, existential threat to public lands.

But there’s a reason Pendley is peddling this fiction as fact: He’s trying to make the public case for a plan that would put wild horses on the pathway to extinction.

We need to call out this misinformation. If you disagree with Pendley, then we need you to add your name on our petition to reject his outrageous assertion that wild horses represent the biggest threat to public lands.

Add Your Name >>

 

 

Here’s a quick look at the real threats and dangers facing public lands, Mr. Pendley:

Don’t let Pendley off the hook for spreading dangerous and damaging lies. Sign here to reject Pendley’s ridiculous claim that wild horses represent an “existential threat” to public lands.

Sign The Petition >>

 

 

Thank you,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director

P.S. — It’s difficult to overstate how significant it is for the Acting Director of the BLM to label wild horses and burros “an existential threat” in an official capacity. We have to set the record straight and expose his lies — Every donation helps us do that and defend our wild horses and burros.

Donate

Haines Oregon Show Judge0003CC

MULE CROSSING: Judging a Show

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By Meredith Hodges

Being asked to judge a show is both an honor and a tremendous responsibility. Just being asked to judge indicates that you have a reputation for being a knowledgeable and respected person in your field of expertise. Accepting the invitation to judge means that you are willing to share this knowledge and expertise with people who may, or may not, accept IT or you! Exhibitors can say that each show reflects only one “man’s” (judge’s) opinion, so not to worry if you don’t do well. As an exhibitor and a judge, this bothers me a little.

If the basics of Horsemanship, or Mulemanship, remain constant, then the consistency among judges should also remain fairly consistent with only a little variation from judge to judge. The variation in placements should be determined by the performance of the exhibitors and not by the personal opinions of the judge. The judge should be a catalyst toward better learning and performance. He or she should try to make their knowledge readily available to inquiring exhibitors and be diplomatic enough about its delivery to inspire and encourage exhibitors to improve their skills. In turn, the exhibitors will be better equipped to exhibit their animals in a favorable light to the public at large and to grow into knowledgeable experts themselves with time and experience.

A good judge serves three major interests: that of his own conscience, that of his exhibitors, and that of the spectators. He must know all the rules and regulations pertaining to the classes to be judged and be willing to select the best animals for the purpose described by the conditions of the classes. He should be objective in his decisions and be able to back them up with reasonable and knowledgeable explanations that will inspire exhibitors to work harder and learn more. He should have a congenial attitude that invites exhibitors to question and learn freely without intimidation.

Judges are human too, and for this reason judges are restricted from judging people and animals that are in some manner closely related to him. This enables the judge to maintain his objectivity and adds more credence to his final decisions. In my opinion, judges should assist in helping exhibitors realize their full potential by helping them to improve their skills through fair, just, and educated decisions. A good judge needs to serve the idea of better learning for the sake of health, wealth, happiness, and above all, safety! A judge can be the catalyst toward learning and self-satisfaction, or he can be the catalyst toward defeat and discouragement. I prefer to be the former, encouraging exhibitors to come to me with their questions and also encouraging them to learn from each other. In our Longears industry, the ideal scenario would be to have exhibitors work at home and with each other perfecting their Mulemanship skills, bring those exhibitions of skills to a show to be judged, then return home with a feeling of accomplishment and more things to work on until the next show and the next judge. To perpetuate the learning process and to continue to learn and improve himself should be a judge’s main objective.

The Mule Skinner’s Classic held June 30-July 1 in Haines, Oregon, was a good example about what I am talking. Never before have I encountered an entire division of youth with such a thirst for knowledge and a desire for good sportsmanship, no doubt inspired by the adults. Application of good Mulemanship skills was prevalent and the mules and donkeys reflected this exceptional conditioning, care and handling. The show itself was obviously handled carefully and with attention to detail, leaving little margin for error or dispute. It is not really too surprising that a group such as this was able to elicit tremendous support from sponsors in their area. Their hard work and hospitality is to be appreciated and congratulated. It said a lot for the kind of people that we have in our industry – that we can all have a good time learning and showing together with our marvelous Longears, amateurs and professionals, exhibitors and judges alike! The whole idea is that each and every one of us has something to offer and something we can learn. To attend a show and to learn something new is to return home renewed and fulfilled, even though you haven’t won. To win without this mutual admiration, goodwill and learning is just another hollow victory!

There were no losers in Haines, only sixth, seventh, and eighth, etc. places! Those who weren’t doing as well as they had expected didn’t make excuses or try to assign undue blame. They realized that everyone has bad days and unforeseen disasters from time to time and it doesn’t mean you’re a lousy rider or trainer, or that you have a lousy Longears. Those who had mishaps or misfortunes were readily comforted by other friends and competitors. The ambiance of the entire weekend show was one of learning and camaraderie. If we can keep this perspective in our industry, perhaps we can avoid the politics that have nearly destroyed the horse industry and continue to enjoy the overwhelming potential of our longeared friends while improving our own skills and allowing ourselves personal growth.

Everyone learned something at the Oregon Mr. Longears Mule Skinner Classic, including the judge! Dick and Debbie Cress and Alan and Elaine Case are to be heartily congratulated for their exceptional efforts in putting on a successful show and for taking wonderful care of this judge! Thank you to all of you who gave your time and efforts to work on the show and make it run as smoothly as it did! Thank you Larry and Fran Howe for coming with me from Colorado to help judge the packing classes and for helping to Ring Steward and to Gary Hodges for his fine photography! My deepest congratulations go to all the exhibitors for a superb effort. Keep up the good work! Thanks to our announcer Roger Harrison. And a very special congratulations to all of our Mule Skinner Classic Champions!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1990, 2016, 2019 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

9 SAVED – CAN WE ADD ONE MORE BIG KID??? 1800 POUNDS OF MEAT?, OR 1800 POUNDS OF HAPPINESS – YOU CHOOSE!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

WILL YOU SAVE MY LIFE TOO???

Matt and I are headed up to get the 9 kids, and had to pull over for a quick question?CAN WE SAVE THIS SPECIAL BOY AS WELL? He is scheduled to ship imminently, and when we got the call, we had to try.

He is a gentle giant, albeit a “roachback”. But look at that face, he so does not deserve to die. His fee is expensive, as with his weight he will bring a nice fat paycheck if he is shipped to slaughter.

Please, let’s add him to our list of happy, safe horses. THANK YOU!

CLOCK IS TICKING. HE NEEDS YOUR HELP NOW!

THANK YOU!! FROM “BIG MATT”, (You guessed it, I am naming him after my hubby who sacrifices so much.)**

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

What you need to know about the Devil’s Garden roundup →

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

We wanted to make sure you had the chance to read this before getting too wrapped up in your weekend Meredith.

The roundup in the Devil’s Garden Wild Horse Territory in California ended this week, resulting in the permanent removal of 499 wild horses from their federally protected habitat. Already three of them have died at the U.S. Forest Service’s Double Devil Wild Horse Corrals.

This latest roundup followed the removal of 932 wild horses last fall from Devil’s Garden. The USFS announced last year that the captured wild horses could be sold without limitations on slaughter (we’re suing to stop them).

Take a moment to read our breakdown of The Devil’s Garden roundup in numbers, and if you can, please make a donation to support our team as we wage two separate lawsuits on behalf of these wild horses.

Our team is working around the clock to protect the Devil’s Garden mustangs from more roundups and slaughter – Every donation, no matter the size, helps power our fight.

If you’ve already donated or cannot at this time, please consider sharing this with a couple of your close friends. Our wild horses and burros don’t have a voice – So we have to use ours.

Thank you for your continued support,

Your friends at The American Wild Horse Campaign

Donate

“Why don’t you sue?” — We are

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

A common question we get asked when we shine a spotlight on cruel practices and unjust policies that threaten our wild horses is:

“Why don’t you sue?”

The answer is – we are! The American Wild Horse Campaign currently has 6 active lawsuits. We consider litigation as one of our central pillars of defense against the increasing number of threats facing wild horses and burros throughout the West.

We’ve had some incredible successes – putting in place legal protections that will stand the test of time. In the case of Devil’s Garden, we’re currently suing to protect nearly 500 wild horses from potentially being sold to slaughter.

Take a moment to read below about how we’re defending wild horses and burros in the courts of law.

And if you can – be one of the 100 donors we need to step up on this #WildHorseWednesday before midnight so we can continue to advocate and defend our wild horses and burros.

We’re only able to get involved in these legal fights because of supporters like you donating to emails like these. Be one of the 100 donors we need to step up before midnight on this #WildHorseWednesday to support our work! >>

Thank you for looking this over and for your continued support,

American Wild Horse Campaign

P.S. – Getting the word out about our work helps us out immensely! So if you could forward this email to three friends, then we can close out this #WildHorseWednesday knowing we made a difference in the fight to defend America’s wild horses and burros!

THEN IT WAS NINE – 9. WILL YOU HELP US SAVE ALL THEIR LIVES.. MORE DEADLINES & LIVES AT STAKE

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

WILL YOU SAVE MY LIFE??? (And my friends?)

The baby shown above is going to ship if we do not step up! As of tonight, there are 9 lives at stake,

Rescue is overwhelming, the constant need for fundraisers, the calls you cannot say yes to, the constant cries for help. Yet once again, we are stuck.

We simply do not have enough funds to save all these kids.

We have to be responsible to the horses already at the rescue, and we cannot take on more if we cannot properly care for them.

That being said, I believe there are enough folks who care about these precious souls who will step up and help us save them. We have committed to paying for 5, but have not covered the costs yet. Again, we are going on faith, even committing to those 5.

It takes an average of approximately $350 per horse, to purchase, get them vetted and have their blood drawn, (so they can be transported) and get them home. That is just to “save them”, and that is just the beginning.. That does not include basic feed or any additional vet care etc.

We HAVE to have additional funds for feed & care (hay, grain, vaccines etc.), or we cannot commit to saving them all.

Matt and I are willing to do the work, but the horses need your help now! You have saved so many lives, please let’s keep on “Gitten ‘Er done”’ and save ALL 9 of these lives.

The donkeys are in extremely poor shape health wise. The stud is extremely aggressive, and has not only plowed over one of our favorite people and sent him flying, he BITES! Their hooves are in horrible shape, and they will need lots of extra care and vetting.

I am out of town, and was actually trying to take a couple “rescue free” days to have time to say good bye to a much loved friend. But this was a call I couldn’t ignore. (I know she would be unhappy if I let these innocent babies die, just because my heart is filled with sadness by her passing).

So in her honor I am continuing the fight, and asking y’all for another miracle. Let’s save these lives. PLEASE donate now!!!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

We’re rising to the occasion

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

It’s difficult to overstate the threat to wild horses and burros posed by the Cattlemen’s Association/HSUS/ASPCA, et. al., and their mass mustang roundup plan. If it goes into effect, up to 20,000 horses and burros each year for the next three years will be rounded up and removed from public lands.

Over the next ten years, the total number removed from the range could be as high as 130,000 wild horses and burros. 

But thanks to dedicated supporters like you who have spoken out, signed petitions, and donated, this dangerous plan is drawing national attention and backlash:

Momentum is building, but we’re facing a major deadline to stop one cruel method that the plan allows — a brutal and outdated surgical procedure that BLM intends to use to remove the ovaries of wild mares. Many veterinarians have spoken out, but more are needed to convince Interior Secretary David Bernhardt to pull the plug on this inhumane surgery.

We need as many veterinarians as possible to sign this letter to Interior Secretary Bernhardt by October 18th — please forward it to your local vet today.

Mass Roundups & Surgical Sterilization Are Not The Answer

These wild herds are at risk of being destroyed forever. And this isn’t hyperbole — mass roundups would reduce wild horse populations to near-extinction levels. Surgical sterilization would destroy the mustangs’ natural behaviors, which make them truly wild and help them survive in the rugged West.

There are much better and far safer management options to maintain viable and healthy herds of wild free-roaming horses and burros on our public lands.

The National Academies of Sciences, in its 2013 Report to the BLM, made it crystal clear that roundups don’t work:

We’re Showing There Is A Better Way

Every single day, our darters are proving that humane management of wild horses in the wild is possible. And our PZP birth control programs are getting results.

In the span of five and a half months, our team of 14 volunteer darters in the Virginia Range in Nevada delivered more fertility control treatments to wild mares than the entire BLM, with its $80-million-a-year-budget, did in all of 2018.

Just last week in the Onaqui Mountains in Utah, AWHC’s darter worked with the BLM and the Wild Horses of American Foundation to dart 81 horses.

The fact is, PZP programs are getting results. We stand ready to work with the BLM to expand these programs so that wild horses and burros can live as nature intended — Wild and Free.

The BLM plan and these escalating roundups represent a historic threat to one of America’s greatest national icons. At this time, we’re asking if you could get your local vets signature on to this letter to Secretary Bernhardt by October 18th:

We will continue to keep you updated and thank you for your continued support,

The American Wild Horse Campaign

Donate

Thank you for supporting the wild burro protection league!

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The following is from TMR Rescue:

Here are TMR Rescue we care for several wild mustangs from the american west. Also we care for 66 wild burros. We are in the process of working with the animals and eventually finding them good permanent homes where they are appreciated and loved. We would love your financial support and if possible come visit us and our wonderful animals just north of Houston, TX.

Some of our beautiful mustangs at the ranch

Just a small sample of our precious wild burros at the ranch.

Donate to Help

 

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