Monthly Archive for: ‘April, 2021’

SHORTEST 911 EVER! 13 BABIES WHO NEED US NOW!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

13 Orphans (NOT including the 1st 13) & I am standing by for more.

Thank you for all the milk and supplies. Sadly I am blowing through them like crazy.
_Not sure if everyone will survive. Some have bad injuries, many of them internal _

Lots of Prayers n much help needed. Doc is here almost every day. Our vet bills are high with all the sick and injured.

The season is barely starting and I am BEYOND inundated. I need lots more help to care for these and be ready for the next ones if I am going to be able to keep saving them. THANK YOU!!

Harrah Veterinary 509 848-2943 if you’d like to help with vetting.

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. I Used the last 2 Foal Responses on my 2 new tinies last night. We are going through milk like crazy!
We are also having to get blood drawn to check IGG levels on the littles. $$$

These babies will be posted for adoption when they are ready.

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

As of right now, Firefly, aka Stella – is still with us and fighting for her life. I can’t even believe she survived the wreck in the first place. Please say a prayer for our precious little girl.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

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MULE CROSSING: Assessing Your Equine

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By Meredith Hodges

Just like humans, all equines have different personalities. They’re not cookie cutters and should not all be treated the same way, so observe your equine whenever possible and see what he naturally likes to do, and then adjust your training program accordingly. Although each animal must go through the same kind of basic training to make sure he is building good core muscle strength in balance and good posture, he will have his own way of learning, so your presentation of the tasks may differ from one animal to the next. When you have multiple animals, treat each one of them like he’s your favorite.

Before you invest a lot of time and effort deciding whether to continue training your equine or that he will be happier as part of the stud barn, take the time to evaluate his athletic potential. The principles discussed in this article—which are applicable to donkeys, mules or horses—were developed by my mentor, the renowned resistance-freehorse trainer, Richard Shrake.

First, let’s look at conformation. It goes without saying that your equine should appear wellbalanced and in good proportion, with flat knees and smooth joints. He should be free of unsoundness. There are published standards on most breeds, or you can pick up a good 4-H manual or a judging manual to give you an idea of what the ideal is for each breed with regard to conformation

Next, we’ll look at body measurements that are used to gauge your equine’s athletic ability. These measurements will help you assess the kinds of activities for which your animal is best suited, so you can plan whether or not to take his training beyond the basics.

Begin with a six-foot piece of baling twine or string. The first measurement is from the poll to the middle of the withers. Then measure from the middle of the withers to the loin at the base of the rump. If these measurements are the same, you have a balanced animal that will be able to perform with more ease. If the neck is slightly longer, he will still be athletic because the head and neck are used for balance. But if the neck measurement is shorter, it will be difficult for your equine to balance through certain movements and transitions during all activities.

Next, measure your equine around the throatlatch. Then measure around the collar from the withers to the chest at the point of shoulder and back to the withers. This measurement should be twice that of the throatlatch, which indicates that your equine will be better able to flex at the poll,making him easier to collect and bring into the correct framefor optimum performance.

Now measure the top of the neck from poll to withers and the bottom of the neck from throatlatch to chest. The top line should be 1.5times that of the bottom, enabling your animal to perform nice, soft movements during all activities. A “u-necked”animal cannot bend properly and will never be able to achieve good collection in balance and good posture. His neck and back will be hollow, making it difficult for him to efficiently carry a rider, which can result in future soundness problems.

Next, measure the equine’s legs from the elbow to the coronet band, and then from the stifle to the coronet band. Both measurements will be the same in an evenly
balanced animal. This means he will be a good pleasure prospect, with smooth movements at the walk and trot. If he’s a bit longer in front, he will be a good prospect for Reining, jumping or Dressage because his trot and canter will be smooth,with greater impulsion from the hindquarters with an uphill balance.  An animal that is higher in the rear will find it difficult to balance, so he’s probably not going to be a good athletic prospectbecause the weight will be unevenly dumped on his front quarters.

Ideally, your prospect should also be graced with 45-degreeangles at shoulder and hip,and with the same angle at his pasterns. This ideal angle will result in softer gaits and transitions, whereas a straighter hip and shoulder will result in abrupt transitions and a rougher ride. The higher the angle (90+ degrees), the longer the stride will be; and the shorter the angle (90- degrees), the shorter and quicker the stride.

Now let’s see how your prospect moves. Stick a piece of masking tape at the point of his hip as a visual reference point. Ask someone to assist you by trotting your equine on a lead as you watch the way he moves. Does his hock reach underneath and pass in front of the tape? If it does, his hindquarters will support strenuous athletic movements, his transitions will be more fluid and smoother, and his head and neck will stay level. If his hock does not reach underneath him sufficiently, he will be out of balance and must raise his head and neck through transitions.

Finally, ask the person assisting you to lead your equine while you watch him walk through smooth sand. Does his hind hoof fall into the track made by his front hoof? If he is exact, he is graced with the smooth, fluid way of going of a world-class pleasure animal. If he over-reaches the track, he has wonderful hindquarter engagement and you may have a candidate for Reining,Dressageor jumping. If he under-reaches the track, he is out of balance, causing him to raise his headand neck. He will have difficultythrough transitions and movements, which will undoubtedly make him unsuitable for advanced athletic activities.

These measurements can be quite helpful in determining your animal’s athletic future, and they can be trusted because the laws of physics are at work. But there is more to being a great athlete than just conformation. You must also assess at the personality of each individual animal. Again—these principles apply to mules, donkeys and horses.

First, let’s look at your animal’s trainability. One of the benefits of owning a registered animal is that you will have plenty of background information regarding his gene pool. Some lines are famous for being smart, athletic and good-natured. Some are known as being high-strung and nervous, perhaps making them inappropriate for certain riders. Plan to do your research before you look at a prospective animal being sold by a private owner or at an auction.

There are some practical tests you can do to help you assess an animal’s trainability. First, ask the person assisting you to hold your equine’s lead rope while you pick up a handful of sand, and then trickle the sand through your fingers near your animal’s head. Does he turn and look at you? If so, this is a good indication that he is interested in what you’re doing, which usually means he will be more trainable than an animal that ignores you.

The next test is to run your finger lightly from your equine’s girth, across the barrel to the flank. Do this on both sides. Does he tolerate this with little movement, or does he twitch and even flinch? This test will give you an idea of how he will react to your legs when you are riding. (The animal that is less touchy will be the one who learns your cues most efficiently, whereas the one that flinches is more likely to overreact.)

Now stand at your animal’s shoulder and gently put your hand over his nose, and then ask him—with a gentle squeeze and release action from your fingers—to bend his head and neck toward you. Do this on both sides. Does he bring his nose around easily or do you feel resistance? If he gives easily, it is a good indication that he is submissive and will be willing to learn more quickly.

The final check is a simple test to assess your equine’s reaction under pressure. Ask the person assisting you to hold the lead rope while you make an abrupt move, such as jumping and flapping your arms. What is your equine’s reaction? If he tries to run off, he’s probably not the best candidate for equine sports such as Side Saddle or driving, which require a steady animal. On the other hand, if he stops to look at you and tries to figure out what you’re doing, he may be a really great candidate for advanced training.

When you go through the basic exercises on the lead line and in the drivelines, there may be times when you experience resistance from your equine. Think of your animal’s resistance as a red flag that could be telling you that you either need to reassess your approach and consider a different path to the same end, or that you may simply need to break a current action down into smaller and more understandable steps. Don’t get caught up in the blame game (“It’s his fault, not mine.”) and lose your temper just because things aren’t going the way you expected. If, instead, you adopt the attitude that your equine is trying to communicate with you and that, when you meet with resistance, it is your responsibility to change what you are doing, you can avoid a lot of frustration during training and things will go more smoothly between the two of you.

And remember, just because a certain approach worked with one equine doesn’t mean it will work the same way with a different equine, so treat each animal as an individual and stay on your toes. Equines are as diverse in their personalities as humans and each individual may have a different way of learning from one to the other. Look at training as the cultivation of the relationship you want to have with each individual animal and adjust your own actions accordingly.

Keep in mind that, regardless of conformation and trainability, when you do the right kinds of exercises toward good posture and balance in their correct order—and with adequate time spent at each stage—and adjust your approach to the training of each individual, the result will be that your equine will feel much more comfortable. He will recognize your efforts on his behalf and, as he progresses, training will come more easily for both of you.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2014, 2016, 2018, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Wild Horses in NV, WY, CO and CA need YOUR help!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

This week there are four important Action Alert deadlines for comments on mass roundup plans targeting wild horses and burros in Nevada, Wyoming, Colorado and California!

So, please take a moment to weigh in for meaningful change for wild horses and burros by taking the actions below:

Lake Mead Burros
Comments due Friday, 4/30!

Burros are incredible animals and evolving science is documenting the important role they play in the desert ecosystem. But a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plan for wild burros in the Lake Mead Complex outside Las Vegas would zero out wild burros from two of three habitat areas, and leave behind a minuscule number of burros in the third. For good measure, the BLM also wants to capture and remove every wild horse living in the area. Take action to oppose this by Friday.

TAKE ACTION

The Sand Wash Basin Wild Horses of Colorado
Comments due Saturday, 5/1!


Photo credit: Kimerlee Curyl Photography

The BLM is targeting the famed Sand Wash Basin wild horses in Colorado for mass roundup and removals. The HMA covers roughly 157,700 acres of public land and is currently home to an estimated 935 wild horses. The BLM’s proposed plan calls for the removal of 772 wild horses, leaving a mere 163 horses in this HMA!

The Sand Wash Advocate Team (SWAT) has worked tirelessly to implement a PZP program in this HMA, yet these horses are still targeted for mass removal. The BLM’s current plan calls for continued use of PZP, but would also allow for the use of unstudied IUDs as an alternative form of population control. Submit your comments by Saturday and oppose the BLM’s plan!

TAKE ACTION

Devil’s Garden Wild Horses
Comments due Friday, 4/30!

The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) wants taxpayers to spend as much as $18 million to fund 6-8 years of wild horse helicopter roundups in the Devil’s Garden Wild Horse Territory in the northeast corner of California. The USFS wants to reduce the wild horse population to a fraction of its current size in order to maximize commercial livestock grazing on public lands where the horses live.

Worse, even though they’re asking you to pay for it, the Forest Service doesn’t want your comments on the plan! However, as one of a handful of designated “stakeholders,” AWHC is committed to making your voice heard in this process. Sign our petition by Friday.

TAKE ACTION

Wyoming Checkerboard Wild Horses
Comments due Friday, 4/30!


Photo by Living Images Carol Walker

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is again targeting the wild horses of the Wyoming Checkerboard for a massive helicopter roundup that will remove a shocking 3,500 wild horses — or 40% of the state’s wild horse population — from 3.5 million acres of habitat in the southern part of the state.

The plan calls for drastically reducing the population to just 1,550 wild horses roaming free. Under this proposal, the BLM plans to treat and release 290 mares with PZP and use unproven IUDs. The BLM is also considering an alternative plan that calls for the surgical sterilization of 100 mares, the castratation of 100 stallions, and would skew the sex ratio of the population to 60% stallions and 40% mares. Submit your comments by Friday to oppose the BLM’s plan!

TAKE ACTION

Thank you for your support,

—The AWHC Team

FIFTEEN LIVES SAVED – IT’S GO TIME AS ALWAYS!!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

The calls just keep coming. As of last night I now have THREE more babies and am on standby for more this evening.

Every baby that as come in is severely dehydrated, has injuries and the vet is here almost on a daily basis.

Please help so I can say yes when the call comes this evening.

We lost our beautiful Tessa. She was so banged up when she came in. Sadly we thought she was our healthiest, but her internal injuries proved to be too much. Doc explained that a tiny tear or injury can turn into a deadly one once the foals start moving around. Sadly, in spite of being under vet care, she lost her fight. She was such a Mama’s girl, and was so loved by all.

Firefly is in critical shape. Her internal injuries from being trampled and catapulted into a building (right in front of my horrified eyes) appear to be causing immense issues. The more she started moving and playing, the more stress she put on her injured body. She is losing her will to fight, so she needs your prayers. Sometimes God just gives us these babies to love and comfort before they pass, but the pain is overwhelming and it makes me want to quit.

Donations have been hit hard by Covid, but I do have to keep fighting for these precious lives. I so appreciate each and every penny y’all donate to help these little ones. They do not deserve the life they have been handed. I can’t change the world, but together we can change the world for one life at a time.

Thank you for always being part of this heartbreaking journey. Hopefully the lives that flourish will keep our hearts fed so we can continue the fight. Prayers are so appreciated.

Thank you for ALL the donations of supplies, milk, milk money etc. I was going through 80 pounds of milk powder every 3 days with so many babies.

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

As of right now, Firefly, aka Stella – is still with us and fighting for her life. I can’t even believe she survived the wreck in the first place. Please say a prayer for our precious little girl.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

Help a Horse today!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Today is National Help a Horse Day! Will you please make a donation to our Rescue Fund so we can protect wild horses and burros from slaughter?

Every year, April 26 is a day dedicated to encouraging horse lovers to come together and advocate on behalf of America’s beloved horses. And this year especially, we need your help to protect wild horses in danger of slaughter.

As part of an investigation into the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Adoption Incentive Program, AWHC staff members have been monitoring kill pens across the country and documenting so many BLM mustangs being sold at these slaughter auctions.

In our search, one AWHC staff member came across a one-year-old mare at a kill pen in Texas. She was all alone and due to ship to slaughter in less than a week.

The sad reality is, that with so many wild horses and burros in kill pens across the country, many rescue organizations are spread thin in their efforts to save these animals.

We knew we had to step in and save the little roan filly, so we partnered with Montgomery Creek Ranch, a beautiful wild horse sanctuary in northern California, to pull her out of the kill pen.

Will you make a donation today to our Rescue Fund in honor of Help A Horse Day? Your donation will help us have the resources necessary to support the rescue of fillies like this youngster from shipping to slaughter.

DONATE

There are so many beautiful and beloved wild horses and burros that are trapped in kill pens all across the country, thanks to the BLM’s terrible Adoption Incentive Program, which creates a financial incentive to adopt and then dump these innocent animals.

So far, we’ve been able to help rescue more than a dozen wild horses from kill pens, thanks to wonderful sanctuaries and rescue groups, and with the help of generous supporters like you. Your support will help us help save more horses from slaughter, like the filly we were able to rescue from Texas.

Can you make a contribution in honor of Help A Horse Day? Your gift to our Rescue Fund will help us save so many innocent horses and burros in need!

DONATE

Thank you,
American Wild Horse Campaign

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Longears Music Videos: Pack It In: Packing

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See more Longears Music Videos

We did it

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We have another exciting AWHC win this week! SJR3, the resolution calling for the roundup of more than 40,000 Nevada wild horses and burros, is dead! 

The resolution did not advance out of the Nevada Senate Committee on Natural Resources for a Senate floor vote by yesterday’s deadline. This is good news! While the resolution did include AWHC’s amendment to prioritize funding for humane fertility control over mass removals, it still contained problematic language blaming wild horses for damage to public lands caused by livestock grazing and other commercial activities.

If SJR3 as originally written had passed, the Nevada Legislature would have asked Congress to fund an 85% reduction in Nevada’s wild horse herds. And, as the state where over half of America’s wild horses reside, Nevada’s voice on this issue is very influential in Congress. That’s why the defeat of SJR3 is very important.

We wanted to say thank you on behalf of AWHC and Nevada’s wild horses and burros. 

Thanks to everyone who weighed in against this resolution and made wild horses a top issue in the Nevada legislature, currently second only to guns!

But Erica, even though SJR3 has been killed, our work is not over. AWHC is continuing our fight to protect wild horses and burros all over the West — with several other legislative and legal battles happening across the country right now.

If you’d like to make a donation to help us gather the resources necessary to continue this fight, thank you — you can use the button below to do so. If you’re unable to make a donation at this time, no worries — we’re grateful for your help in protecting the wild horses and burros of Nevada. Please stay tuned for more updates!

DONATE

Thank you,
Suzanne Roy

Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

BABIES, BABIES, BABIES! THEY JUST KEEP COMING – FIFTEEN (15) INJURED AND/OR DEHYDRATED BABIES IN THE LAST MONTH

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Meet “FIREFLY”.

This beautiful girl was roped to the point of having raw, infected wounds on her neck. She was trampled and smashed into something hard enough to cause permanent???? damage to her jaw. She cannot chew correctly, has a huge swollen area on the side of her face, her lip hangs almost as if she has permanent nerve damage and obviously she came in terrified.

The phone keeps ringing. In the middle of one emergency, we get another call!

I realize we have had a lot of “emergencies”, but sadly that means we have had a lot or orphaned, injured and dehydrated babies. Not one single baby has come in healthy. The vet bills are climbing every day.

The average cost to care for a baby is approximately $21 per day!
This does NOT include vet bills, medications, etc. etc.

Y’all saved – Vance aka Vanessa, Captain, Trey, Tessa, Lucky, Chrome, Brian, Joey, Scooter, Firefly, Radar, Trooper, Tucker, Lil Red & Nicholas, and Lucy the Lamb.

Adopted (New Mama’s – see below) Chrome, Scooter, Brian & Joey
Trooper (RIP)
Nicholas – adopted (follow on our adopter’s page)
Tucker & Lil Red (“Dustin’ Time Rescue” in Pocatello)

7 With me at CampTessa, Firefly, Lucky, Radar, Vance (aka Vanessa), Trey, Captain.

Thank you for helping save these 15 precious souls. Sadly however, most all of them have required extra vet care and medications. We are going through well OVER $140 a day in supplies with milk powder, shaving etc. This does NOT include vetting, Coggins, health certs, brand inspections etc.

Thankfully I have wonderful folks taking care of everything in NV, but that is also a big expense. (A huge % of what they do is on a volunteer basis, but it still is a large expense out of the budget.)

I So appreciate all of our Chilly Pepper Family! YOU are the reason ALL of these babies are safe or no longer suffering so much. THANK YOU!!

Please remember, If I don’t ask for help, I cannot help the babies and they will not survive. It’s all about the horses!

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

THE BABIES all settled in with their NEW MAMAS!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

Another win for wild horses and burros!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We wanted to share an exciting update with you!

This past December, in collaboration with Utah citizen, Robert Hammer, we filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of the Interior to stop the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) from performing risky and inhumane surgical sterilization surgeries on federally-protected wild mares recently rounded up in Utah.

And, we’re happy to report that this morning, government attorneys informed our lawyers that the BLM is dropping their plans to conduct inhumane sterilization surgeries on wild mares in Utah

Not only is this a huge victory on behalf of the wild horses of Utah, but this is also the THIRD time that AWHC’s legal action has blocked the BLM from proceeding with the controversial surgeries in wild mares!

But these successes are only possible because of the continued support of people like you. Your donations and advocacy efforts on our behalf have proved invaluable in our fight to protect wild horses and burros. Will you make a contribution today to help us defend wild horses and burros through legal action?

DONATE TODAY

The new leadership of Interior Secretary Deb Haaland — someone who AWHC supporters like you pushed your members of Congress to confirm — no doubt played a key role in the BLM’s decision to drop plans to conduct these invasive and risky surgeries.

When in Congress, Sec. Haaland was a champion for wild horse protection, signing onto a letter spearheaded by AWHC and the Animal Welfare Institute, calling on the BLM to abandon plans to conduct sterilization surgeries. She also co-sponsored a House amendment to promote fertility control as a humane management option.

And this morning, we saw the effects of having wild-horse friendly leadership in Washington!

While today was a big win, your support is still critical to our efforts to ensure that wild horses and burros maintain their freedom and remain protected from special interests. We are already gearing up for necessary legal action to defend wild horses in Wyoming, California, and other states against proposed federal actions to decimate wild herds.

Will you make a donation today to help us continue our legal efforts and other important work to protect wild horses and burros?

DONATE TODAY

Thank you for your continued support,

American Wild Horse Campaign

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MULE CROSSING: Understanding the Use of Cruppers and Breeching

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By Meredith Hodges

The purpose of tack and equipment has always been to give man leverage against the equine’s resistance during training, but I believe that the equine is “talking” with his resistance and this is a cue to find another alternative to achieve harmony when something isn’t working. There is an ongoing discussion about the use of cruppers and breeching when riding mules and donkeys, and even some horses. The purpose of both is to keep the saddle from sliding forward when the equine is in motion, whether he is tracking on flat ground or going up and down hills. Inappropriate use of both devices could give the equine problems. Whether or not to use a crupper or breeching is not an either/or decision. My equines taught me that in order to make an educated decision about which to use, one needs to take into account the anatomy of the equine and the effect that each has on his body in motion during different activities.

Good conformation is important in allowing the equine to perform to the best of his ability, but the tack we use has an effect on the equine’s movement in spite of his shape. In order to obtain freedom of movement, the elements of the equine’s anatomy must be allowed to move freely through every joint of his body. Energy and blood circulation finds open tracks throughout the body and when unobstructed, will run freely from the core of the body to the extremities in a healthy equine. Core and bulk muscles that are developed symmetrically support the skeletal frame, the cartilage and ligaments that surround the joints, and the tendons that tie the skeletal frame together. All work to support the proper internal organ functions and when the equine in good posture with symmetrical strength, they are unobstructed.

Many people have approached me with questions about cruppers. Their primary concern is that the crupper can break the tail when under pressure. If there is enough pressure put on the crupper to break a tail, then the crupper should break first! When the skeletal system is adequately supported with symmetrical muscle strength and especially over the top line, the animal is better equipped to use his body efficiently, tucking his tail and using leg muscles to support his own weight while his spine remains flexed upward along the top line to support the weight of the rider. The extremities have full range of motion so he can pick each step with confidence and no obstructions. An animal with insufficient conditioning will hollow his back and neck and try to compensate for his inefficiencies in muscle conditioning and movement. When pressure is put on the crupper of an animal with inadequate muscling, there is weakness over the top line and tail that will not support heavy weight of going downhill and could possibly do damage to the spine at the dock of the tail. Just for the record, I have done lots of trail riding and three years of cross country (3 miles, up and down hills, over twenty jumps) and have always ridden with a crupper on all of my mules with nary an incident.

Breeching originates with pack and driving animals and has a distinctive purpose to keeps loads from shifting on pack animals and to provide “brakes” for those in harness. Breeching generally has a “crupper” built in with straps on both sides to attach to the saddle and help to stabilize the load. But in each case, the breeching is being used with an inanimate object that will not resist against any adjustments or corrections that the animal might make in his own body. An unbalanced rider is more difficult for the animal to balance than an inanimate load. The equine can adjust his load with his own body movements, but he cannot easily adjust a live load that works against his balance like an unbalanced rider would inadvertently do. If using a crupper, the animal has full range of motion in his body and legs with the maximum strength to back up any movement that would help to correct the rider’s position and keep him over the equine’s center of balance.

The problem with breeching on a saddle equine is in the configuration and the way it sits anatomically. When going downhill, the breeching must be snug to do its job properly and it will keep the saddle from sliding forward. However, it also compresses the biceps femoris, a large muscle in the hindquarters that functions to extend the hip and hock joints, and also causes a flexion of the stifle, and a rotation of the leg inward. When pressure is applied to this area, it restricts circulation and extension of the hind leg backwards and causes compromises in the muscles groups resulting in asymmetrical conditioning. This doesn’t pose a real pressure problem going downhill. The stifle joint is configured so it can lock when needed through a stay mechanism between the stifle and hock, but it should still have the freedom of full range of motion if it is to function properly and not get unduly locked up. When the actions in the animal’s body remain symmetrical and orderly all of the joints, including the stifle, are able to function properly. The stifle will usually get locked up only when there are chaotic and unsupported directional actions coming through the joint.

When going uphill, however, the breeching must still be snug to do its job, but the animal is not allowed full extension of the hind legs, so more pressure is put between backward motion of the femur and the breeching. This results in compromised circulation, restricted movement in the hind legs and an inability to control hind quarter foot placement. In a crupper, the animal going uphill has full extension in his hind quarters, an ability to maintain good posture and balance and this results in exact foot placement to maintain that balance comfortably and safely.

The weight and ability of the rider will determine how much pressure is put against the animal and how much resistance it will cause. Even though mules can carry proportionately more weight than a horse of the same size, this doesn’t mean you can indiscriminately weight them down until their knees are shaking. Be fair and responsible and do your part in the relationship. Do not expect the animal to carry an obviously overweight body that doesn’t know how to control itself! Participate in training activities that prepare you both, first with groundwork and later under saddle. As you learn to ride correctly and in balance, you also learn how to ride supportively and take the stress out of going uphill and downhill. You will then find the crupper much safer and more efficient when riding in all kinds of terrain…even if you are a little heavier than you should be. You and your animal will be conditioned properly and he will be able to pick his way efficiently, safely and unobstructed!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2017, 2018, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. MULE CROSSING All Rights Reserved.

MVHitches

Longears Music Videos: Single Hitch and Teams

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The BLM is planning mass roundups across the Wyoming Checkerboard…

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Wild horses & burros need your help!

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service are currently preparing for the upcoming roundup season, and as such, have released several disastrous plans for mustangs and burros that need your immediate attention.

We’ve told you recently about a lot of roundups planned and we know sometimes this news can be overwhelming. But don’t forget — the power to stop this is in our hands, and we are gaining more support every day … with the public, in the scientific community, in state legislatures, and on Capitol Hill. Lawmakers know that wild horses and burros have a loud and powerful constituency and we must keep raising our voices for change so that they are truly protected on our public lands.

Please take a few moments to read about the latest roundup plans below, and then ACT! 🐴

BLM to Reduce Wyoming Wild Horse Population by 40%

The BLM recently released a plan that would permanently remove 3,500 wild horses — or nearly 40 percent of the state’s wild horse population — from 2.5 million acres of habitat in the “Wyoming Checkerboard” in the southern part of the state. The plan calls for drastically reducing the population to the low Appropriate Management Levels (AMLs) in five federally designated Herd Management Areas (HMAs): Adobe Town, Salt Wells Creek, Great Divide Basin, White Mountain, and Little Colorado.

This mass roundup plan will cost taxpayers tens of millions of dollars. It will cost these historic wild horses their families, their freedom, and, for many, their lives. The cruel policy is driven by commercial interests, in particular, the Rock Springs Grazing Association (RSGA), whose members graze their cattle and sheep on public lands and view the horses as competition for cheap grazing. Since 2011, AWHC has been involved in litigation against the RSGA to defend the wild horses in this area and has amassed numerous court victories, including at the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. We intend to continue the legal fight to defend Wyoming’s wild horses and to rally public opposition to this plan.

Please weigh in now in opposition of this disastrous plan!

TAKE ACTION

Forest Service to Decimate California Wild Horse Population

The U.S. Forest Service plans to step up its assault on the Devil’s Garden wild horse herd in California’s Modoc National Forest. Its years-long battle against these historic wild horses began in 2012, when the agency attempted to reduce the size of their habitat by 22,000-acres. We went to court and we stopped them. Pursuant to an appellate court ruling, the Forest Service must consider those 22,000 acres as an active part of the horses’ habitat.

Now, the Forest Service has released an “AML Implementation Plan” that is only being sent to “stakeholders”. The plan reduces the Devil’s Garden wild horse population to just 206-402 mustangs (down from 1,900 today) to achieve an “Appropriate” Management Level that was set based on the illegal elimination of 22,000 acres of the horses’ habitat. The plan does not evaluate the appropriate population size for the larger habitat and is based on the policy of allocating most of the forage in the area to commercial livestock. Indeed, the agency permits an incredible 3,700 privately-owned cows and 2,900 privately-owned sheep to graze in the mustangs’ habitat! And if all of that wasn’t enough, the Forest Service has rejected our offer to implement a humane fertility control program to actually manage the horses effectively in the wild, instead of relentlessly rounding them up with helicopters, penning them, and selling them for $1 a piece.

AWHC is considered a stakeholder with the ability to comment on this plan, but we represent all of you — the American people — and believe that you should also have a say. So please join us in signing onto our letter opposing this inhumane and expensive management plan.

TAKE ACTION

Utah’s Sulphur Herd is Being Targeted Again

The BLM is seeking public comments on a roundup and removal of wild horses from the Sulphur HMA in Utah.

In 2017, the Beaver County Commissioners in Utah filed a lawsuit seeking to force the BLM to remove all “excess” wild horses from the Sulphur HMA. The request sought to eliminate hundreds of federally-protected wild horses from their habitat in order to reduce the competition with domestic livestock. AWHC and our coalition immediately filed a Motion to Intervene in order to protect wild horses on the range. Earlier this year, the case was settled out of court.

Now, the wild horses are back on the chopping block. The HMA is made up of 265,711 acres of public and private land and is currently home to an estimated 414 wild horses. However, the BLM set the “Appropriate” Management Level for this HMA at just 165-250 wild horses. The plan calls for achieving the low AML, leaving just one horse per every 1,600 acres! At the same time, like most of the areas where wild horses live, the BLM allows thousands of sheep and cattle to graze within the HMA. Please take action today.

TAKE ACTION

Forest Service Aims to Decimate Northern Arizona’s Wild Horse Population

The U.S. Forest Service recently released a Territory Management Plan for the Heber wild horses, a unique band of horses that reside within the Apache Sitgreaves Forest in northern Arizona. This plan will decimate this historic population, leaving as few as 50 horses on nearly 20,000 acres of public land! Meanwhile, the agency permits thousands of cattle to graze within the horses’ habitat.

These horses have been the target of brutal shootings in the Forest that have left 28 dead since 2018. Enough is enough. We must speak up loudly for the Heber wild horses and demand better treatment, a fairer plan, and ultimately, justice!

TAKE ACTION

Thank you for your support,

—The AWHC Team

IT’S GO TIME – MORE CALLS – INJURED/NEWBORN BABIES! VET IS ON THE WAY – PLEASE HELP NOW! STANDING BY FOR MORE!!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

 

ANOTHER 911 !!

The phone keeps ringing. In the middle of one emergency, we get another.

Sadly, my beautiful boy “Trooper”, who came with a dry mare, arrived too late to help. (It was the wrong mare). He lost his life due to starvation and a lack of Colostrum. By the time I got him, there was no hope, although I didn’t know it right away. I knew he was fragile, but have to say it was still shocking how quickly he crashed. The internal damage was already done, and he never stood a chance. We got him late afternoon, gave him his colostrum, got him stabilized, he drank his milk and he seemed to be resting quietly. No fever, and by 3 a.m. we were at WSU Emergency Vet Hospital, (3.5 hours away). His short life on this earth was full of pain and sickness. Thankfully once we got him he at least had some pain relief and a full belly. Never ever give anything prior to Colostrum, and it has to be soon, without delay, after being born.

I had not even arrived back at camp when the phone rang. Another new orphan, this time 2 or 3 days old? Brian was dehydrated and horribly constipated. We made it through the night and he is doing better than when he came in. He will see the vet today.

Hours later – (today) – ANOTHER call. 2 more day old babies needed our help.

Vet was just here. Two of the boys are hanging in there; however the 3rd little colt is very fragile, and needs so many prayers. He is on antibiotics and will be monitored 24.7 Like Doc said, they can be fine one minute and crashed the next. So many folks don’t realize that they can look “good”, but inside it’s a different story. These babies are ULTRA fragile, especially when they are only days old.

These critical cases are not only hard, but very expensive. We are still not caught up from the last few rescues and all the vet bills those babies incurred.

These precious boys are going through our supplies quickly. We really appreciate any help. I am currently on stand by for more babies, and right now the focus is to keep these boys alive and get them stable.

Lucky is coming home. Sadly he did not bond with his new Mommy. She adored him, but he simply wasn’t interested. We have done hundreds and hundreds of foals, and seen this quite often. When a baby is pushed out by the band, it is usually a terrifying experience, and they often take a long time to see adult horses as safe. He plays horsey games with Tyler, (our mini), and he and the baby Brian will be keeping each other company.

One of these precious babies will get the Mama that would have been Lucky’s. She was ultra patient and loving. It will just be a matter of time until Lucky can be comfortable with the big guys.

I couldn’t say no to these precious boys. Please help if you will.

Want to say thank you to the folks who helped with Trooper. Such heartbreak, but so grateful his last hours were as they should be. Peace full, a full belly and knowing so much love.

It looks like “the season is HERE!” I can’t do it without you. Please help me keep on doing this work God puts in front of me.

So appreciate all of our Chilly Pepper Family!

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

LUCKY SAYS “THANK YOU” FOR HANGING IN THERE AND PRAYING FOR HIM!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

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MULE CROSSING: Training Longears: What’s the Difference? Part 2

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In Part 1 of What’s the Difference? we began to define a few of the things that are unique to my training program. At the beginning of my career, it wasn’t long before I realized that, if I wanted to improve my skills and get a better response from my long-eared equine partners, I had to go back to the beginning, start over and pay close attention to what they needed from me at each stage of training in order to accurately perform what I was asking. When I did, lessons truly became a resistance-free, cooperative effort!

I soon realized that leading training had more value than just teaching to lead, tie and perfect technique for a showmanship class. For instance, holding the lead rope in the left hand while pointing to where I was going with the right hand, and using the right hand to maintain the position of the equine, was an important way to allow him to be responsible for his own balance with minimal interference. When I was holding the lead in my right hand, every movement of my hand caused him to have a slight loss of balance. Having the fanny pack of crimped oats strapped to my waist kept his attention on me and prevented him from forging ahead or running off entirely. Teaching the trot on the lead rope was much easier.

I soon discovered that the equine would actually measure his stride to mine when I paid attention to my own posture during leading and kept my steps and stops rhythmic and in synchronization with his. When I kept my transitions from walk to stop smooth and fluid and stopped with my feet together, so did he. When I was consistent about asking him to square up and put equal weight over all four feet at every stop, he would soon make the adjustment himself when I turned to face him. I saw an improvement in balance and strength as I kept my walking lines straight and my turns smooth, working on a gradual arc rather than abrupt turns.

When I saw the difference in the equine’s at-rest position and play patterns, it was evident to me that the muscles at the core that surround the skeletal system were becoming stronger from these passive, isometric exercises. The mind of each animal was more alert and tuned into our tasks, and there was no real incidence of disobedience when I did my part correctly. In the quest to improve their strength and balance, I improved my own substantially.

On the obstacle course, the task is first to instill confidence and trust. When you lead, and use the crimped oats reward, it alleviates fear in the equine and gives them the motivation to explore. Over time, he begins to trust your judgment. When you put obstacles in comfort zones where they eat and rest, it will create anxiety instead of instilling confidence. In my estimation, equines aren’t really afraid of the obstacles themselves. It’s just a fear of being trapped or hurt.

But there is further value in obstacle training on the lead rope. With flatwork leading training, you have cultivated strength and balance in the equine at the core and are now ready to add coordination. Once the equine has learned to negotiate the obstacles without fear, he is then ready to go back through the obstacles and learn coordination by breaking these obstacles down into much smaller steps.

At each obstacle, approach, stop and square up in front of each obstacle. Then ask for the front feet to be placed into the obstacle, stop and square up. Then ask that all four feet be placed into the obstacle, stop and square up. Then ask for the two front feet to exit the obstacle, leave the hind feet within the obstacle, stop and square up. Then exit the obstacle, stop and square up once more before leaving the obstacle.

This approach teaches the equine to stop and rebalance at every new position throughout the obstacle. It builds body awareness as well as adding coordination. You will see that they are not really as balanced as you might think when you ask them to put the two front feet off the far side of the bridge while leaving the hind feet on the bridge. The equine will generally try to keep going forward, or the hind end will pass the front end as it falls off the bridge. When he is capable of doing so, he will be able to hold the position, but you might have to provide assistance the first few times in this awkward position.

You will soon discover after this kind of training that you no longer get your feet stepped on, and that they will avoid stepping on hoses during baths, or cords during clipping. They are truly more able to effectively balance their own bodies. And when you begin lunging in the round pen, the equine is better able to comply with your wishes to balance correctly on the circle at walk and trot. Movement will be more rhythmic with smooth and fluid transitions.

When allowed to freely move in the round pen at walk and trot, the animal who has had the benefit of detailed leading training will exhibit better balance than the one who has not. When he canters, the unbalanced equine will want to raise his head, and hollow his neck and back in varying degrees. In order for him to continue to build muscle in the correct frame, I use an aid I developed called the “Elbow Pull” to help maintain good posture and balance. I was first introduced to this concept by Richard Shrake. If the equine is allowed to exercise with the head and neck raised, he would build muscle out of good equine posture. That would need to be corrected later, and would cause disobedience during the lessons due to soreness, especially if done with a rider on his back. Strengthening the equine body in the correct posture first with the “Elbow Pull” and without the rider will prevent this problem. In addition, with this device, the equine will be started in a snaffle bit with the desired direct rein communication and will learn to be submissive and light in the bridle.

This originally disturbed the Dressage community until I was able to explain its function. This is a self-correcting aid for the equine. It does not force him to keep his head down. Rather, it simply does not allow him to raise his head too high and invert his neck and back. He is free to raise his head, but if too high, it puts pressure on the poll, on the bit, behind the forearms and over the back. It suggests that he lower his head and stretch the muscles across the entire top line in correct vertical flexion. When he is in good posture, all pressure is released and muscle is built symmetrically throughout the entire body in balance and good posture.

When doing exercise in the round pen, if verbal cues and rewards are consistent, your equine actually learns verbal communication in conjunction with body language and his understanding will increase much like a child’s does in grammar school. Equines may not be able to speak English, but they can certainly learn to understand it. Being in good posture will begin to facilitate correct lateral bend to his body and build those muscles in correct posture. He will offer the canter when he is strong enough, so forcing canter is not necessary. Turning him into the fence for the reverse will set him up for the correct diagonal at trot and the correct lead at canter allowing him to make transitions easily and smoothly.

When the equine’s body is developed properly, he will be strong enough and will have the necessary control of his own body to handle the added shifting weight of the rider. Most equines struggle with their own awkwardness and before they get control of their own bodies, they are asked to deal with the awkwardness of the rider at the same time. This often results in perceived disobedience. The equine that is stable in his core muscles and body carriage will be better able to help the rider maintain and improve his own balance and control. Bucking and bolting cease to be a problem.

Learning certain moves is easy and takes much less time, but for maximum performance there is no substitute for taking the time to properly build and condition the muscles that will support your equine’s good postural frame. If you are willing to put in the time and effort necessary, the result will be an animal that is happy and comfortable in his work, light in the bridle and a beautiful mover. Your relationship and performance will soar to unimaginable levels!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

© 2010, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.

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LTR Training Tip #34: Keep Lessons Short and Easy

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Training sessions that are too repetitious and last too long will only fatigue and frustrate your equine, resulting in unwanted resistance. Keep lessons short and easy for the best training results.

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ACT NOW: Protect horses in transport

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We have an opportunity to ban the transportation of horses across state lines in “double-decker” trailers. 

Transporting horses in double-decker trailers is both dangerous and cruel, and can result in significant injuries and even death for horses. These trailers are designed for much shorter species, and fail to provide enough headroom for horses — forcing them to stand in painfully cramped conditions during long-distance transport.

There is some good news: Many states have already banned the use of these inhumane trailers and the U.S. Department of Agriculture has prohibited the use of these trailers as a means of transporting horses to slaughter.

But  there is no permanent federal law to prevent horses from being transported in these dangerous trailers for any other reason. 

U.S. Representatives Steve Cohen (D-TN), Dina Titus (D-NV), and Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA) have introduced the Horse Transportation Safety Act in Congress to ban the transportation of horses across state lines in “double-decker” trucks or trailers.

Meredith, please take the following steps right now to help us ensure the safe transportation of horses:

  1. Call your U.S. Representative and urge them cosponsor the Horse Transportation Safety Act, H.R. 921. When you call your representative, use the following script:

“Hello, I am a constituent, and I’m calling to ask you to please cosponsor the Horse Transportation Safety Act, H.R. 921, to protect horses from being transported in dangerous double-decker trucks and trailers. Thank you.” 

  1. Use this link to follow up your call with a personalized email urging your representative to cosponsor H.R. 921!

Will you join us in supporting this critical bill to protect the safety of all horses? Using these double-decker trucks and trailers is a cruel and inhumane practice that often results in needless deaths of horses in transport.

In order to get this bill passed, we need all hands on deck. Will you join us in supporting H.R. 921 and contact your representatives today?

Thank you for your support,
Holly Gann Bice

Director of Government Relations
American Wild Horse Campaign

URGENT HELP NEEDED – ANOTHER CALL – DRY MARE WITH A 10 HOUR? OLD COLT NEED YOUR HELP ASAP! TRAILER ON THE WAY!!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

 

b

As my heart was breaking into a million tiny pieces, I unloaded Lucky from our trailer into Bev’s trailer. After 25 days of literally 24/7 – constant care, our beautiful LUCKY is still with us. He survived so many crashes by the Grace of God!

He has a vet coming today or tomorrow to his new place, and he will be hooked up with a real “horsey Mama” at our friend Bev’s. Loading him into another trailer and watching him drive away nearly dropped me to my knees.

My tears had not even stopped when the phone rang. Another 911. This time for a 10 hour old? little foal who has not had a drop of Colostrum and sadly a tiny bit of milk. He/she is on his way with his skinny Mama to see if we can possibly save him. No one knew the mare was pregnant. She is wormy and skinny and losing hair so it is pretty clear he did not get everything he needed in the early stages of his development. Baby is already starting to fail, so he/she will also need lots of prayers.

I have not had a chance to assess Mama or baby yet, but I do know we are looking at some serious 24/7, round the clock care, and some hefty vet bills. He/she will get colostrum as soon as he gets here, and the vet is already on notice that they are arriving. He/she will need his IGG levels checked and very likely a Plasma Transfusion.

We need to stock up on hay, more milk powder, Colostrum etc. _Funds are scarily depleted and I am praying y’all want to step up and help us get the baby and his Mama whatever care they need._ The season is just starting, and as I said, I hadn’t even returned from delivering Lucky when the call came in.

IT’S GO TIME, and there is nothing to indicate this year will be any easier than last year. PLEASE DONATE if you can and share. Chilly Pepper has quite a few special needs that have to stay on permanently, and they love their feed, vet care etc.

The babies have gone through nearly ALL the milk. ANY help is much appreciated. Anyone who wants to donate directly to vet bills can simply call Harrah Veterinary at 509-848-2943 and donate ANY amount towards our ongoing bills. Just tell them it’s for Palomino – Chilly Pepper. You can also donate to Zimmerman Vet in Winnemucca. 775-623-0981. We have incurred so many bills from this last group of babies, health certs, geldings, tubings, iv’s etc.

As always, YOU are the ones who keep this going. We are just hitting the busy time and I am praying I get to go home for a couple of weeks. These last babies have already gone through hundreds of dollars of milk, enemas, meds and supplies.

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

LUCKY SAYS “THANK YOU” FOR HANGING IN THERE AND PRAYING FOR HIM!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

USDA Must Reinstate Horse Protection Rule!

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The following is from the American Horse Council:

American Horse Council Action Alert

Senate “Sign-On” Letter to USDA Supporting Horse Protection

As you might recall, in early 2017, the outgoing Obama Administration issued a final USDA rule on the Horse Protection Act (HPA) to end the practice of “soring” of a horse’s limb. This rule mirrors the industry-endorsed “Prevent All Soring Tactics” (PAST) Act by taking common sense measures to protect certain Tennessee Walking Horses and Racking Horses from the practice. Unfortunately, the Trump Administration suspended the HPA rule four years ago and never reinstated it.

The horse industry and its allies in Congress are currently lobbying the new Administration to bring the HPA rule back, by circulating a petition to USDA. Contact your senators today and urge them to sign the petition below and reinstate the Horse Protection Rule of 2017!

Take Action

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MULE CROSSING: Training Longears: What’s the Difference? Part 1

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By Meredith Hodges

At first glance, it seems those of us who train equines have very similar methods. This is not unusual considering we build our programs on time tested techniques and only make changes in approach when certain things are not working well. We often begin to interact with equines at a very young age and are the product of what we learn from others, and from our own mistakes. The things we learn shape our attitude and approach to riding equines, and riding is first and foremost in our minds right from the beginning. Growing up, we rarely hear anything about groundwork training and when we do, we don’t usually want to spend too much time with it.

Our youthful exposure is limited to the equine trend of the decade and popular breeds of horses unless we are fortunate enough to be the son, daughter or friend of a diverse trainer…and the first thing most people learn about mules is usually negative. Mules have taught me to be kind, respectful, patient and logical in my approach to elicit the best response. When problems arise, I don’t need to fix them, only myself! And when I do, they do the right thing.

When working with horses, we get away with shortcuts in training because the horse is more easily manipulated than the mule or donkey. After training horses for many years before riding Longears I really thought I knew how to ride and train. Much to my chagrin, my introduction to mules showed me just how much more I had to learn to be a truly competent and humane equestrian! I could get a lot from mules and donkeys with horse training techniques, but they did not seem to be as energetic, engaged and consistent. As the level of difficulty increased, I got less and less compliance with my “horse” approach and in time, I was truly humbled! I knew I had to modify my techniques!

I realized that if I wanted to improve my skills and get a better response from my long-eared equine partners, I had to go back to the beginning, start over and pay closer attention to what they needed from me in order to do what I asked. They say there are multiple ways available to the same end, which is true, but what I discovered in my years of training mules and donkeys is that there really is only one BEST way for the best results…their way! This applies to all my equines though my horses tend to be less confident and assertive than the Longears.

Training begins with nutrition and the way your equine is fed. An equine that is fed at a specific time each day is far less stressed than those with inconsistent feeding times and will learn easier. What you feed and how is critical. Equines should be fed in stalls and runs, or in dirt pens and then have monitored turnout times during the day for good health. There are various feeds today designed for the performance equine, researched by scientists in laboratories who seldom see the long-term results of these feeds. These feeds often produce faster growth and give the young equine an appearance of adulthood. When they are not allowed to grow at their natural pace (phases that often make them look awkward and gangly) the bones grow too fast and do not have the chance to harden the way they should.

For optimum bone growth, they need to grow a little and be stressed for awhile before the next burst of growth to become hard. The most obvious example of this can be witnessed in yearling halter classes at today’s shows. Equines used to exhibit very high haunches and low withers as yearlings, lacked muscle tone and were quite awkward looking. They did eventually evolve into beautiful animals, but it took time. These days, you generally see what appears to be a young, but very adult-looking horse with relatively even growth front and back and unusual muscle tone. As they age, bones and soft tissue are not as easily sustained, they become arthritic or have other old-age problems and their longevity of use is compromised. Those equines whose growth has not been artificially accelerated tend to do better and live longer.

Many of today’s feeds can cause hypertension, an inability to concentrate on their job and more frequent occurrences of colic and founder. This is why we feed a crimped oats mixture and good quality grass hay only. Any elaborated products and alfalfa hay can create problems later.

Why feed the oats in the evening? In the spring, your equines should be introduced to new pasture grass slowly. This means you feed in a dry area or small pen and let them out for limited periods of time. For instance, if they were going to be fed at 5P.M., you would only let them out at 3-4P.M. to start. When they know they will have oats, they will come back much easier.

Can I leave my longears on pasture? The answer is no, you really shouldn’t. Donkeys are desert animals and can subsist on practically nothing. The mule is half donkey and has the same trait. If left on pasture, Longears gain weight quickly that can lead to obesity and eventually colic or founder. This is also true of horses that are easy keepers. It’s better to be safe than sorry and monitor feeding more carefully. This includes where you place their feed. If multiple animals are together in a dry pen, use feed buckets or pans and keep them at least 16 feet apart to avoid fighting and possible injury. Don’t feed on the ground. Keep hay in bunks, racks or over matted or other clean, hard surface areas to minimize ingestion of sand and dirt.

What do I use for rewards during training? I wear a fanny pack of crimped oats and dispense them as rewards. Crimped oats are healthy, they get the additional energy they need while they are working and above all else, they will not get sated on them like they will on carrots, apples, horse treats, etc. Diversity in the rewards will cause diversity in their behavioral responses. I strive for confidence, obedience and consistency in my equines.

What if he becomes aggressive toward the rewards? Isn’t it better to avoid this by no food rewards? The equine will give you his best if he is “paid well.” Good behaviors that are rewarded with a food reward will be more likely to be repeated. There is a very specific correction for those who become too aggressive for the oats: Say “No” very loudly. Use the flat of your hand with a well-placed slap on the side of the mouth and put your hand in front of his face like a stop sign. He will fling his head up and to the side to avoid you and start to step back at which time you take oats from the fanny pack, quickly step forward and offer the reward while saying “Thank you for giving me my space.” The next time he tests you, you will only need to put your hand up like a stop sign and say “No!” He will then step back and wait for his reward.

The equine that receives food rewards will not only offer more during training, but he will learn how to take things from a human’s hand safely. When they are regularly given rewards, equines learn how to be gentle and careful about receiving those rewards. They will avoid biting down on your hand or fingers. Those who do not get this practice are more apt to accidently bite your fingers…or the fingers of some poor unsuspecting person who naively wanted to stop and feed your animal.

What is the difference between my methods and Clicker Training? Both are based on Behavior Modification where good behaviors are rewarded and the reward used is the same healthy crimped oats that they are normally fed. Clicker Training lets the animal know by the clicker that a reward is coming before the reward is dispensed. You might use the same reward, but using your voice instead of the clicker is much more personal and communicative.

I prefer to use my voice because it is far more enticing and engaging. If you learn how to respond verbally to your equine’s good and bad behaviors instead of using a device, you will invite an intimate bond between you that is more mutually satisfying. Over time, the verbal language will continue to grow from short commands to actual conversations, very much like children learn language. Equines may not be able to learn to speak English, but if you are a good listener, calculated and consistent in your approach, they can certainly learn to understand it!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

© 2010, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.

Join us in celebrating 2 years of our PZP Program!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Today marks 2 years since we relaunched our PZP fertility control program in the Virginia Range in Nevada. We can’t believe it’s been 2 years already! 

Porcine Zona Pellucida (PZP) is a scientifically-proven fertility control vaccine given to female horses on the range through an injection via remote darting with an air rifle. It’s administered in a two shot process — the first is a primer, which is then followed by a booster approximately two weeks later. The vaccine prevents fertilization and pregnancy via an immune response that does not affect the horse’s hormonal system.

The result is a humane and cost efficient way to control wild horse populations, rather than subjecting wild horses to brutal helicopter roundups!

But these successes are only possible because of the continued support of people like you. Will you make a donation today to help us continue our PZP program and our other important research to protect wild horses and burros?


Johnny, an AWHC volunteer darting a mare.

We signed our Virginia Range Fertility Control Cooperative Agreement with the Nevada Department of Agriculture 2 years ago, today, with support from Nevada Assemblyman Jim Wheeler, Blockchains CEO Jeff Berns and Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak. And Erica, we’re happy to report that we’ve celebrated some pretty big successes since then! 

Take a look below at some of our PZP program’s successes to date:

Total Treatments administered: 3,552 Total mares treated: 1,416 Number of horses in our database: 3,300 wild horses Total number of volunteers: : Approximately 35 volunteers Volunteer hours spent: Over 21,300  to date  Number of properties we have permission to dart on: 80+ properties including a massive amount of BLM.

Right now, we are early into foaling season, Erica, but so far we are trending with 62% fewer foals born on the Range compared to this time last year. Even better, the current numbers reflect a zero population growth, which is fantastic given our goal of humane population reduction in this herd whose habitat has been dramatically reduced by development! These numbers will continue to fluctuate and change as we get further into foaling season, but it is a very promising start.

Will you help us to continue the successes of our PZP program with a donation today? A contribution of $30 or more will help us prevent removals and keep the historic Virginia Range wild horse herd wild and humanely managed on the range!

DONATE

Thank you for your support,
Suzanne Roy

Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

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