Monthly Archive for: ‘March, 2021’

THANK YOU FROM CHILLY PEPPER & ALL THE CRITTERS Y’ALL HAVE SAVED! MANY PRAYERS NEEDED FOR LUCKY!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

 

Meet “LUCKY # 5”

Lucky was found wandering alone on the range just hours after his birth. We have no idea whether he was abandoned on purpose due to his health issues, or his band was scared away or something happen to Mama.

He came in with some gurgling sounds and was twitching and shaking off and on. He was given Colostrum immediately, and thus started the journey of Foal # 5.

Lil Red is finally at a point you could call “stable”. He crashed so many times it seemed like he had no chance. He went down after he was tubed, nearly into a coma. Then he had to have Doc come out again. He is still having some gut issues, but doing very well overall.

Hunter is also doing pretty well, and the little lamb was adopted out to a wonderful home.

Nicholas, was the 1st baby on this last, very long trip. He went to a very special adopter and is thriving. You can follow him on our adoption page. He and Lucky look like twins except Nicholas is much larger and older.

So now we come to # 5. LUCKY is still absolutely touch and go. He is on all sorts of medications and is making all my hair fall out from worrying about him so much. We had his blood work done, and it is not bad. His IGG levels are good, which means giving him the Colostrum was most likely exactly what he needed. Thank you to everyone who donated so we could afford to have it on hand.

Please keep him in your prayers. Lucky is having all sorts of random issues and his waste still smells like death. I am hoping and praying this is not why he was left alone hours after being born.

We have incurred lots of vet bills, and the babies are loving their milk. They are going through mass amounts and I want to thank the folks who sent it. None of this would happen if it wasn’t for y’all.

Our beautiful Appy mare, now know as Lady, went to a wonderful new home this weekend. Today, Hawk, Hidalgo and Bailey (aka CC) arrived at their new homes. So adoptions are going well, although my poor lil heart keeps breaking. It stinks to not be the “best home” for a horse you are in love with LOL.

I have “baby brain”, from not sleeping much for the last 4? weeks. I am up all night, every night with these kids, so hopefully this all makes sense. Just wanted to stop between making milk etc. and giving Lucky his meds to say THANK YOU! We couldn’t do it without you, and yes, we still need help. Look how much you have accomplished. I cannot even believe what magic happens when we all come together.

God bless and please keep these babies in your prayers!

The babies are going through milk like crazy. ANY help is much appreciated. Anyone who wants to donate directly to vet bills can simply call Harrah Veterinary at 509-848-2943 and donate ANY amount towards our ongoing bills. Just tell them it’s for Palomino – Chilly Pepper.

As always, YOU are the ones who keep this going. We are just hitting the busy time and I am praying I get to go home for a couple of weeks. These last 3 babies have already gone through hundreds of dollars of milk, enemas, meds and supplies.

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

 

We could lose 40,000 wild horses… if you don’t act now

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We could lose 40,000 wild horses if you don’t act TODAY!

SJR 3, a resolution that calls on Congress to fund brutal helicopter roundups of at least 40,000 of Nevada’s cherished wild horses and burros, is being pushed by cattlemen, big game hunters and wildlife trappers who want to profit from the public land where wild horses roam.

Nevada’s wild horses belong to all Americans, so we need everyone to weigh in against this bill today.

Please send an email to the Nevada Senate Natural Resources Committee and tell them that you oppose SJR 3: SenNR@sen.state.nv.us. Be sure to use the subject line “I oppose SJR3.”

Personalized emails will make the most impact! Use these talking points when sending your email:

  • SJR 3 supports brutalizing Nevada’s wild horses and burros and decimating their wild populations so cattle can graze the public lands where they live.
  • SJR 3 is against the wishes of 86% of Nevadans who want to protect and humanely manage wild horses and burros.
  • SJR3 supports spending $1 billion or more in taxpayer dollars on the failed approach of roundups instead of long-term solutions like fertility control.
  • SJR3 will harm Nevada ecotourism and business development because few of these iconic animals will be left for visitors and residents to enjoy.
  • SJR 3 would lead to slaughter because the cost of rounding up and incarcerating so many wild horses and burros would quickly become untenable.

It’s critical that you weigh in against SJR 3. Please email SenNR@sen.state.nv.us now!

— American Wild Horse Campaign

DONATE

Young horse lovers, get excited!!!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Young horse lovers can get excited! A new trailer for the upcoming movie, Spirit Untamed has just been released, including Taylor Swift’s re-recorded song, “Wildest Dreams.”

In the movie, a girl and her new friends must save a wild herd of mustangs from rustlers. That sounds a lot like what the American Wild Horse Campaign is working on!

Click here to check out the new trailer for Spirit Untamed and consider making a donation to support our work in the fields, in the courts and on the Hill to protect wild horses and burros.

This movie provides a great opportunity to not only inspire a new generation of young horse lovers, but it also speaks to the very important issue of protecting wild horses.

In fact, right now, the Bureau of Land Management is planning to round up and remove hundreds of Onaqui wild horses from the West Desert in Utah. We are putting together an action plan to protect this beloved herd and preserve their freedom, but we need your help.

If you’re like the young person in the Spirit movie and you care about protecting wild horses, then please click here to watch the trailer and then donate $30 to our cause.

Thank you,

Suzanne Roy

Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

MaintainingHappyDonkey3 2 20 5

CHASITY’S CHALLENGES: Maintaining a Happy Donkey: 3-2-20

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When Chasity first arrived, we needed to keep her in quarantine, away from the other animals for a minimum of two weeks. Over the past 41 years, we altered our facility to an all-steel facility. Reduced maintenance costs enabled us to proceed converting from wood and wire to steel until we completed the process. This has greatly reduced the overall maintenance costs for the entire ranch, enabling us to purchase steel panels for the barn runs. It was easy to quarantine Chasity safely and still allow her company (at a distance, of course!) and an introduction to her future stable mate, Wrangler. About every five years, we do have to spray paint the panels to keep them looking new, but this is a small price to pay for a happy donkey!

Once out of quarantine, Chasity and Wrangler were stabled next to each other. All of our runs are bedded with four inches of pea gravel. This promotes good drainage and keeps things from getting muddy. This, in turn, provides a hard surface for good hoof health and will not chip their feet because of its rounded shape. Each of our donkeys is given a soccer ball for play in the smaller areas. The ground surface is also soft and comfortable enough for them to lie down without causing shoe boils or sores. They learn to come by calling them to the end of the runs and rewarding with oats.

The mini donkeys’ pens are the same way, as is the road around the sandy dressage arena where they can also be turned out in the larger dirt area when it is not in use. They really enjoy a good roll in the sand.

Donkeys are desert animals and can easily become obese when exposed to green pastures. I only take my donkeys out to pasture to play with me.

My 60’ x 180’ indoor arena is lined with steel panels. I have a 45’ Round Pen at one end with obstacles inside the side gates around the south end. The enclosed area makes for good obstacle training with minimal distractions. Round Pen work and turnout in the open area during bad weather is completely safe and NON-DESTRUCTIVE!

At first, Chasity would not come to me at the stall door, but after being chased once into the stall to be haltered, she soon gave in easily. I always halter in exactly the same way, in the same place. They love routine.

The oats reward assures that she will repeat the behavior. After only one lesson, she now comes to me every time to be haltered. For clean, dry stalls, we bore a 2’ wide x 4’ deep hole in the center, fill it with 1 ½” rock, cover it with four inches of pea gravel and put rubber mats on top. The pea gravel is held in with 2” x 6” boards bordered by angle iron.

Since we had no animals in the north stalls, we took down the panels and made a large turnout area bedded in four inches of pea gravel for Wrangler and Chasity. It was plenty large enough to romp and play…and not get muddy!

When I am out and about the barn, I reinforce Wrangler and Chasity’s will, as well as all the others, to come to me for their oats reward. We keep bulk rock, pea gravel and structural fill in bays behind the indoor arena.

When the equines are in turnout, we replenish the pea gravel as needed with the Skidsteer.

Wrangler and Chasity, our miniature donkeys Augie & Spuds, miniature mule Francis and miniature horse Mirage also have alternate access to a very large 2 ½ acre dirt pen…Large Standard donkeys one day, miniatures the next.

When it is dry, they can take turns on alternate days in the larger area to stretch their legs and buck to their hearts desire. They do not seem to miss being in the pasture with this kind of management and they really do stay very healthy. We have no incidence of colic, founder, abscesses, skin irritations, rashes or obesity.

Wrangler, Chasity, Augie and Spuds are TRULY HAPPY DONKEYS!


AugieSpuds61212

Another Augie & Spuds Adventure: Learning to Ground Drive

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“Augie, come with me while she’s not looking!”

 

“Now that's more like it--working at OUR level!”

“I really like it when she works at OUR level!”

 

“A few last-minute adjustments so everything fits us just right!”

“You have to be really still when she’s punching holes!”

 

“Leading as a team is easy if you’ve done your homework.”

“Leading as a team is easy if you have done your homework!”

 

“Hey, I wonder if WE could use one of those sticks to reach farther!”

“What’s with the stick?!”

 

“Hmm, “Walk on” is pretty much the same, even with all this stuff on us!”

“Walk on?…oh, I remember that!”

 

“Pick up your heels, Spuds, I think she wants us to go faster!”

“I think she wants us to pass her!”

 

“Not too fast, though… she wants us walking beside her here.”

“Oh, I get it…she wants us to walk beside her now!”

 

“Now we’re the leaders—all our hard work in training is finally paying off!”

“WOW! Cool! We get to be in front now!”

 

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2012, 2017, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

Thrilled about Secretary Deb Haaland’s historic confirmation!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Here at the American Wild Horse Campaign, we are thrilled about the news that Deb Haaland has been confirmed by the Senate to be the next U.S. Interior Secretary.

This is a critical role for not only the management of America’s wild horses and burros, but also their ability to roam freely and stay wild.

We applaud this historic nomination and look forward to Secretary Haaland’s inspired leadership in the fight to protect America’s public lands and wildlife. She has long been a champion for reforming the mismanaged federal wild horse and burro program, and we look forward to working with her to implement sensible solutions to humanely manage these majestic animals — which 80% of Americans want to protect.

Will you donate $25 to keep the good news for wild horses coming?

Donate

This is a HUGE victory for wild horses. The American Wild Horse Campaign successfully launched a grassroots push, which resulted in over 5,000 letters sent to Senators all across the country in support of Deb Haaland’s confirmation.

Now we have a wild horse-friendly Secretary of the Interior who we will work with to put the brakes on the BLM’s plans for mass roundups and inhumane sterilization of wild horses.

The work has just begun and Secretary Haaland will need our unwavering support to overcome opposition to reforming the BLM’s mismanaged wild horse and burro program.

The stakes are high. Right now, the beloved Onaqui wild horses of the West Desert in Utah are scheduled for roundup and removal starting July 1. The Bureau of Land Management is still planning to conduct brutal sterilization procedures on captive wild mares from the Confusion HMA in Utah. And Congress has begun its annual Appropriations process and is considering funding for the BLM’s inhumane Wild Horse and Burro Program.

We are counting on your help to stay in the field, in the courts, and on the Hill to protect wild horses and burros! Will you donate $25 or as much as you can today?

Thank you,
Grace Kuhn

Communications Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

Merwesternpuebloslide25

LTR Training Tip #32: Good Posture and Performance

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For your equines to perform their best, they need to have even weight distribution and efficiently utilize balanced movement in their bodies. Learn how to encourage good posture for good performance.

Download Detailed Description

See more Training Tips

Welcome to the Interior Department, Secretary Haaland!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

It’s official! Rep. Deb Haalad has been confirmed as the new Secretary of the Interior! As the first Native American nominated to this position, Secretary Haaland has bravely broken through barriers and the significance of her leading the Department of Interior cannot be overstated. Her historic and inspiring confirmation is a ray of hope for all Americans who cherish our public lands and wildlife, and especially our magnificent wild horses and burros.

Before the Senate’s historic vote to confirm her nomination, Secretary Haaland tweeted:

Indeed as a Congresswoman from New Mexico, Secretary Haaland was a champion for the environment and our public lands – including the protection of the wild horses and burros that call them home. Secretary Haaland brings a new ethic to the table right where it matters most, at the heart of the Interior Department.

In the House of Representatives she:

  • Co-sponsored a historic House amendment, initiated by AWHC and our coalition partners in DC, requiring the BLM to redirect $11 million of the Bureau of Land Management’s annual budget towards PZP fertility control, rather than mass roundup and removals.
  • Cosigned a bipartisan letter, urging the Senate to pass the fertility control amendment.
  • Took a stand against the BLM’s brutal surgical sterilization procedures, urging it to instead use humane, scientifically proven fertility control methods.

With Secretary Haaland at the helm, we are moving in the right direction — towards the protection and preservation of America’s iconic wild horses and burros. AWHC looks forward to implementing sensible solutions to humanely manage these majestic animals that 80 percent of Americans want to protect.

So, please join us in welcoming and celebrating Secretary Haaland by signing our card that will be delivered to her office.

>>Sign the Card Today<<

Wild horses have a fighting chance. This is our moment. This is our time. Welcome to the Interior Department, Secretary Haaland!

The AWHC Team

Donate 

The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Meet “TUCKER & LIL RED”

These precious souls are fighting hard to be here and live in this brutal world. Lil Red has been touch and go from the start and is far from out of the woods. He had to be tube fed and then needed IV fluids. The vet has been out here several times and we are simply hour to hour. Prayers are much appreciated!

His little brain had not finished wiring when he was born. I am pretty sure he was a preemie. I have had numerous other foals like this, and they usually figure things out. He is NOT a dummy foal, just simply not “all there yet”. He was about 3 days old when I got him after being born on the feed lot.

Tucker has been having non stop tummy issues and is a bit colicky. Both have been through the wringer and will likely need more vet care and blood work. They are beautiful little boys who have had their Mama’s ripped away in front of them. Both of them spent the 1st couple nights crying incessantly. It is brutal to hear.

I just got the vet bill this morning for these last babies. This trip alone, the vet bills have totaled $2243.17. (*I LOVE Doc Bruce. His prices are SUBSTANTIALLY LOWER than we were being charged before. He is always there at the drop of a hat and I cannot say enough about how blessed we are. Not only for his expertise, but for the savings on each and every call he comes on.*)

Sadly, the bills still add up with the number of lives y’all are making it possible to save.

Nicholas and the little orphaned lamb both are at their new homes. Nicholas is thriving with his new Mama and is healing not only her broken heart, but the rest of the family’s as well.

The babies are going through milk like crazy. ANY help is much appreciated. Anyone who wants to donate directly to vet bills can simply call Harrah Veterinary at 509-848-2943 and donate ANY amount towards our ongoing bills. Just tell them it’s for Palomino – Chilly Pepper.

As always, YOU are the ones who keep this going. We are just hitting the busy time and I am praying I get to go home for a couple of weeks. These last 3 babies have already gone through hundreds of dollars of milk, enemas, meds and supplies.

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

TWR1 1Replacement CC

MULE CROSSING: Neonatal Isoerythrolysis

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By Meredith Hodges

“Neonatal isoerythrolysis (NI) is a condition in which the mare creates antibodies against the foal’s red blood cells, and then passes these antibodies to the foal via the colostrum. Once the foal absorbs these antibodies, they result in lysis* of the foal’s red blood cells within 24 to 36 hours after birth. This red blood cell destruction is widespread throughout the foal’s body and can lead to life-threatening anemia and/or jaundice. (This is similar to the human Rhesus, or Rh, factor, where a woman who is Rh-negative gives birth to her second or subsequent child that is Rh-positive, resulting in destruction of the newborn’s red blood cells.)1″

All legitimate mule breeders should be aware of this condition, especially because it can occur more often when breeding donkey jacks to mares than it does when breeding stallions to mares within the same species. If the hybrid foal’s blood type is the same as its mother’s, then there is no problem. However, when the jack and the mare have different blood types, and the foal possesses the jack’s blood type, there is potential for NI to occur.

On the surface of the mare’s red cells are antigens that will stimulate the production of antibodies against incompatible red blood cells (RBCs). There are basically two ways that these RBCs can get into her system:

1) If the foal’s RBCs enter the mare’s circulation via the placenta during pregnancy or during delivery.

2) If the mare obtains these incompatible cells during a blood transfusion.

If neither of these conditions occurs, the mare can carry, birth and nurse her foal with no problem. However, if the incompatible red cells do somehow get into her system, she will begin making antibodies against those cells that, in turn, will be passed into the foal’s system via the mare’s first milk, or colostrum.

“Signs of neonatal isoerythrolysis depend upon the rate and severity of red blood cell destruction. Affected foals are born healthy, and then typically develop signs within 24 to 36 hours. In severe cases, the signs of NI may be evident within 12 to 14 hours, whereas in mild cases, signs may not be present until three or four days of age. NI foals will develop progressive anemia, thus leading to depression, anorexia, collapse and death. These foals may also develop pale mucous membranes that later become yellow or jaundiced.”2

The mare’s blood can be tested ahead of time to determine if she has a different blood type than the jack (or stallion), but a positive test result does not necessarily mean that NI will automatically occur, only that there is the possibility for occurrence. Blood samples from the mare and jack should be taken two to four weeks before the mare is due to foal to determine if she is producing antibodies against the foal’s red blood cells. If the blood test is positive, then precautions must be taken to save the foal at birth by making sure it is prevented from nursing its dam for the first 24 to 36 hours. The foal should be muzzled and bottle-fed colostrum from a mare that has not produced these same antibodies, and therefore is compatible with the foal. To be absolutely safe, the colostrum should be obtained and tested from a mare that has never had a mule foal.

For the best results in building the foal’s immune system, this “replacement” colostrum should be collected within the first six hours after birth. The mare being used does not need to be the same blood type as the foal, but her blood must not contain antibodies to the foal’s RBCs. The quality of the colostrum will determine the amount fed to the foal. Immediately after birth, the foal should be given two to three feedings of colostrum within the first two hours, and then be given milk (for energy) for the first 24 to 36 hours after that. Goat’s milk is best for this purpose. After 24 to 36 hours, the foal should be able to be safely returned to its dam’s milk. If NI is present but is caught early enough, the foal can be transfused with blood and there is a chance that it may live, but this transfusion procedure has inherent risks and there are no guarantees of success.

Research on NI has been done over the years on Thoroughbred horses, and statistics indicate that 20 percent have incompatibilities between dam and sire, yet only one percent of foals develop NI. The incidence in mule breeding suggests that the rate is higher. The Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Fort Collins, the University of California at Davis and the Louisiana State University all have laboratories set up to do this initial NI testing on mares. Consult with your veterinarian about contacting any of these facilities for information on how to collect and ship samples for NI testing.

Out of concern for future mule offspring, the Lucky Three Ranch—with the assistance of our veterinarian, Kent M. Knebel, D.V.M.; Colorado State University researcher, Josie Traub-Dargatz, D.V.M., M.S.; and Louisiana State University researcher, Jill McClure, D.V.M., M.S.—began thorough testing of Lucky Three Ranch stock in the early nineties, with particular attention paid to our breeding jack, Little Jack Horner. It was discovered by Dr. McClure that Little Jack Horner’s RBCs were resulting in unidentifiable antibodies in many of the horse mares that carried his foals. The mares that were sampled had antibodies present, but Dr. McClure was unable to “type” the antibodies found in the mares.

The next step was to immunize some research horses at L.S.U. using Little Jack Horner’s RBCs. If they made antibodies, Dr. McClure would have a more readily available source of antibodies for further research. She also took samples from some burros from another L.S.U. project and discovered that they, too, had the same RBC factor that occurred in Little Jack Horner, but the antibodies produced in the mares were still unidentified. There was already quite a bit of medical and scientific data on N.I. that could help in the prevention of this potentially fatal condition. However, this discovery of new antibodies stimulated by the jack and produced by the mare proved that there was still a lot more that needed to be learned. All of Little Jack Horner’s tests showed him to be of a compatible blood type to the mares if he was a stallion of the same species, and yet these unknown antibodies were being produced. Perhaps future research will hold the answer to this puzzle.

A debt of gratitude is owed to veterinarians like Dr. Kent Knebel, who take time out of their busy schedules to collect samples for this research, and to dedicated researchers like Dr. Josie Traub-Dargatz and Dr. Jill McClure, who continue with this important research that benefits our mule industry and its future generations. Their ongoing research will continue to have a significant impact on mule breeding programs, not just here in the United States, but all over the world.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1990, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2018, 2019, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.

Help us save the wild horses – before it’s too late!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Today I’m going to ask that you donate $25 to the American Wild Horse Campaign. But first, let me explain why we urgently need your support:

This summer is going to be a hard one for our cherished wild herds. Their freedom, families, and even their lives are going to be on the line.

Right now, helicopter roundups are paused until July 1 for foaling season. But shortly thereafter, one of the most beloved herds in the country will again be targeted for removal: the wild horses of the Onaqui Mountains in Utah. We have a plan in place to attempt to stop the operation from proceeding and we need your support.

In August, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is planning to conduct brutal surgical sterilization procedures on captive wild mares from the Confusion HMA in Utah. We have already filed suit to stop them and will need the resources to continue what could be a long, drawn-out battle.

Congress has already begun its annual Appropriations process, considering funding for the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program. Will it continue to throw money at the mass roundup and removal of wild horses and burros, or will it require the agency to shift focus to humane, on the range management of mustangs? The outcome depends on us. We need your assistance to help keep our team on Capitol Hill.

While there is much at stake for our wild horses and burros, there are also big opportunities to create meaningful change with a new administration, Interior Secretary, and BLM Director. But time is of the essence — we must act now.

Will you please donate $25 right now and help us save the wild horses and burros of America — before it’s too late?

Thank you,
Suzanne Roy

Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

NEWBORNS ON THE FEEDLOT – ANOTHER 911 – SHIPPER CALLED – IT IS BEYOND GO TIME AND THE BABIES NEED YOUR HELP!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Wow – the insanity has already begunY’all JUST SAVED TEN MORE LIVES since I arrived in WA to pick up the Stallion and the 2 Pregnant mares!

I was getting ready to head back home to NV on Monday when I received another urgent phone call for an orphaned, abandoned foal. Then a call for an abandoned, injured, newborn orphaned lamb. It never stops!

This morning I had Doc come out and pull Coggins on “Nicholas”, (Our most recent Emergency), I was prepping to finally head home and my phone rang again. There are “tinies” at the Shipper’s and I should be getting them tomorrowSo apparently I am not going home anytime soon.

Sadly, NEARLY ALL the funds have been depleted on this last rescue. Every day that I am here, I have to have folks at home taking care of the rescue. Although most of their time is volunteer, it still adds up substantially. (They are amazing!) We also need to get another load of hay for the “special needs” kids at the rescue. Fuel costs are rising and that is a substantial cost for us even before the ridiculous prices we are already starting to see.

I have to get more shelter set up for these critical babies. As the numbers increase, so does the need for safe nursery space to give them what they need.

We spent roughly $2000+ simply to “save” these lives, and spent over $1,000 on vetting for health certs, (and that does not include the latest couple visits). That was just to get the horses to camp and keep them off the slaughter truck. (Just in the last 2 weeks). This DOES NOT include medical care, feed, hauling, etc. It is just a drop in the bucket of the rescue expenses.

I realize folks are struggling. However, I will keep fighting for these lives as long as I have the funding to do so. Sadly I have been warned that they are planning on “hitting it hard” this year because there are so many horses. So I am asking everyone who wants me to keep saving these precious lives to make it happen.

Great news however, these last horses that you saved are nearly all adopted, and yes, we saved the “3 Old Ladies”. They are currently in NV and being assessed. They are approximately 25 years old and sweet as can be.

Sadly we had to let Angel Face leave this world that was nothing but cruel to her. She was in excruciating pain and it was much worse the photos showed. She is running free in Heaven with the Angels and is finally free from the horrific pain. I am still working on the mare with the long feet. However, her owner did get them trimmed (how well I don’t know), and supposedly the vet is going to assess her. I am still on standby. I know it costs a lot to set these souls free, but it is the right thing to do! It is beyond devastating and it feels like you are being torn apart, yet I will always do it if no one else will.

When you see Angel Face below, please know that your love and support ended her horrible suffering. YOU made such a difference for this beautiful soul by alleviating her endless pain. THANK YOU!

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

ANGEL FACE says – “Thank You So Much, for Helping End My Years of Suffering!” I am running free through the grassy fields!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

AASA BIG TURNOUT WITH LITTLE FRIENDS 11 20 20 13

Another Augie and Spuds Adventure: Big Turnout With Little Friends: 11-20-20

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“It’s another adventure, Spuds, but where is THIS?!”

“Looks like a GREAT BIG dirt pen, Augie!”

“Who is this, Augie?! OH! It’s a pretty girl!”

“It’s Francis, Augie!!! The love of my life!”

“Hmmm…what’s this?! Tastes pretty good!”

“Better look out, Spuds! She’s got a boyfriend over there!”

“Hey, Augie! Let’s run away…maybe she’ll follow!”

“Oh look, Spuds, it’s Mom with more OATS!”

“Coming, Augie! Wouldn’t want to miss the oats!”

“Look, Augie! She’s sneaking past Mirage to come and see ME!”

“Hi, Francis! How have you been? I’ve missed you!”

“It was a really hard choice Augie…pretty girl or oats on the ground!”

Spuds is so fickle! I’m going back to Mirage!”

Hey, Augie! Want to go exploring? This is a REALLY BIG place!”

“Check it out…green grass under the fence, Augie!”

“What do you think, Francis? do you like me better than Spuds?”

“Hey, Francis, where’re ya going?..Come back!”

“It’s Billy Bad Ass flirting with Francis now…and Mirage doesn’t seem to mind!”

“Maybe not, but our friend, Billy, didn’t really like them…come on Augie!”

“It may be a MUCH BIGGER pen, and quite an adventure, but we three are buddies forever!”
“What a beautiful day, eh Spuds?!”

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MULE CROSSING: Why Mules Are Exceptional

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By Meredith Hodges

Across the United States and around the world, as mules are given more and more opportunities to perform in many diverse situations, they are exhibiting their exceptional beauty, athletic ability, endurance and intelligence. There are definite physical and psychological reasons for these outstanding abilities. It has been proven that the mule not only inherits the mare’s beauty, but is also more athletic than the mare out of which he came. The mule is an exceptional hybrid not only because he inherits these qualities from his dam, the mare, but he also inherits the best qualities from his sire, the jack who is responsible for his muscle structure, thickness of bone, strength and intelligence.

The muscle structure of a mule is noticeably different than that of a horse. His body is covered with masses of long, smooth muscle whereas the horse has more differentiated bulk muscle masses.

The most apparent example of this difference is seen in the chest of the mule. The horse’s chest has two distinct muscle groups, which creates a very distinctive line of separation in the middle of his chest. However, the mule’s chest is composed of one wide muscle mass that resembles a turkey’s breast, which greatly enhances the mobility of the front quarters. Another example is found in the mule’s hindquarters, where the long, wide and smooth muscles enable the mule to kick forward, backwards and sideways—he can even scratch the top of his head with a hind foot if he wants to! Mules are also quite capable of climbing under, over and through most kinds of fencing. Restraints that are used with horses often do not work with mules because of their astounding ability to free themselves from annoying circumstances with their strong, quick and agile movements. Because the hindquarters of the horse possess bulkier muscle masses, the horse does not have this incredible range of motion. The difference in muscular structure is similar to that of a ballet dancer versus that of a weight lifter—the ballet dancer’s longer, smoother muscles are more conducive to elasticity and agility.

In addition to this physical structure, which allows him more diverse range of movement, the mule also inherits from his sire (the donkey jack) the strength to tolerate prolonged and strenuous use of his muscles. One need only try to budge an unwilling donkey to realize his incredible strength! Donkeys traditionally possess an unbelievable vigor, and this vigor is passed on to the mule, adding to his superiority over the horse in strength and endurance. The donkey jack also contributes to the superior, tough hooves of the mule and a unique resistance to parasites and disease. Throughout their long history, the donkey’s natural ability to survive and thrive in habitats both desolate and unyielding guarantees that donkeys and their mule offspring are more sure-footed than other equines and masters of self-preservation.

Donkeys have long been referred to as “stubborn,” but this is a false and unjust perception. It is not stubbornness that causes an overloaded donkey to stop dead in his tracks to rest his body, but rather common sense and a strong desire for self-preservation. After all, would a sensible human being deliberately pack more than he could comfortably carry, and then continue a hike until he drops from heat and exhaustion? No. Would his refusal to do so be considered as being “stubborn?” Certainly not—it’s just common sense. The same common sense should be applied when understanding a mule or donkey’s behavior—and this holds true in any potentially dangerous situation a donkey may face. For example, when crossing a body of water, the donkey does not possess a human’s acute visual depth perception. Therefore, when he refuses to step into water that seems perfectly safe to us, it is because his depth perception is telling him to use caution and to take his time in evaluating the situation before he proceeds. His behavior is determined by the way he is asked to perform a task and by his concern for his welfare and safety.

As a rule, donkeys are equipped with the innate intelligence to sense that humans are not always concerned with what is really best for them, yet they are still willing to gives us the opportunity to convince them otherwise. Donkeys also have a natural social attraction to humans and, when treated with patience, kindness and understanding, they learn to trust and obey. On the other hand, if they are treated with pain and abuse, they are not likely to comply and can become very dangerous to handle. Mules and donkeys have an honest way of responding to our demands, so if your mule or donkey is not complying with your request, you need to review the clarity of how you are communicating your desire and adjust your approach accordingly. The intelligence of the donkey is no accident.

When a male donkey, with his traits of superior intelligence, strength and muscle structure is bred to a female horse with a calm disposition, good conformation and athletic ability, the result is an exceptional and incredibly beautiful animal—the MULE!

October 26th has been popularly designated as National Mule Appreciation Day, but anyone who’s ever been lucky enough to nuzzle a muzzle knows that these magnificent, gentle, bright, honest, upbeat, funny, patient and loyal friends need our appreciation and guardianship not just once a year but every day. Let’s spread the word whenever we can mules and donkeys are truly amazing!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1985, 2013, 2016, 2019, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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LTR Training Tip #31: Proprioception

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Equines are not born with an awareness of their own bodies, or proprioception, so they must be taught how to orient themselves.

Download Detailed Description

See more Training Tips

USDA Must Reinstate Horse Protection Rule!

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The following is from the American Horse Council:

American Horse Council Action Alert

House “Sign-On” Letter to USDA

Supporting Horse Protection

As you might recall, in early 2017, the outgoing Obama Administration issued a final USDA rule on the Horse Protection Act (HPA) to end the practice of “soring” of a horse’s limb.  This rule mirrors the industry-endorsed “Prevent All Soring Tactics” (PAST) Act by taking common sense measures to protect certain Tennessee Walking Horses and Racking Horses from the practice.  Unfortunately, the Trump Administration suspended the HPA rule four years ago and never reinstated it.

The horse industry and its allies in Congress are currently lobbying the new Administration to bring the HPA rule back, by circulating a “Dear Colleague” sign-on letter, and petition to USDA.  Contact your House lawmaker today and urge him or her to sign the congressional letter and petition below and reinstate the Horse Protection Rule of 2017!

Take Action

 

URGENT HELP NEEDED FOR HORRIBLE ABUSE CASES – UNTREATED BROKEN LEG!!! STANDING BY FOR MORE BABIES!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Look at this poor mare’s leg. Look at the other mare’s hooves. This is serious abuse, and we need to try and save them. Can you EVEN IMAGINE THE PAIN??!

Sadly I do not have much hope for fixing her leg, but I will do whatever she needs. She has suffered long enough. I am hoping we can get her here, have her checked out by the vet, and then ease her pain. She also has to be in agony. After having 40 plus surgeries on my leg, and having my femur snap in half, I can’t even imagine how much pain she is in. With so much weight and stress on that front leg, it has to be awful.

The second mare shown has been beyond abused. She also has to be in agony. It will be a miracle if her Coffin bones have not rotated. Both will need vetting, x-rays and lots of special care. IF I can save the second mare, she will most likely need long term, specialized farrier care as well. If I DON’T GET HER, he plans to CONTINUE BREEDING HER!!! I have been promised the one with the broken leg, but still working on saving her if we raise enough funds to save her and take care of her.

YESTERDAY, I received a 911 for 3 old ladies. They are wild (unhandled) mini’s, aged approximately 25, and they are considered in extremely poor health. They have nowhere else to go and also will need vetting and specialty care.

I am ALSO on notice for more babies. These horses are JUST the ones that God put in front of me these last few days. PLEASE HELP ME HELP THEM!

I NEVER look for horses to save,and sadly, I simply cannot say yes to all of them. The ones I share with y’all to save, well ALL OF THEM are urgent calls and 911’s put in front of me. I am already emotionally spent, and the season is just starting. Of course the last one never ended. I was told there could be a huge number of babies all at once, and since I got 70 in 2 days just a few years ago, that in itself is a bit stressful.

THANK YOU for saving the 6 in NV, and the last 8 in WA. ALL the pregnant mares are doing well and so are the babies. Sadly, Lil Dancer was too far gone, and he is running in Heaven with his Mama.

Thank you to Freedom Reigns in CA for taking the 3 NV wild and pregnant mares!

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help