Monthly Archive for: ‘April, 2022’

TAKE ACTION: Two wild horse herds are at risk (!!) in Oregon

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has announced plans that put two of Oregon’s iconic wild horse herds at serious risk (!!)

The BLM is accepting comments for a disastrous 10-year plan that would drastically reduce the populations of the wild horses who call both the Three Fingers and Jackies Butte Herd Management Areas (HMAs) home.

YOU can be their voice. Will you speak up for the Three Fingers and Jackies Butte wild horses right now by submitting comments to the BLM in strong opposition to this devastating plan?

SPEAK UP FOR OREGON’S
WILD HORSES →

The BLM’s proposed plan would utilize brutal mass helicopter roundups and removals, and several methods of controversial contraceptives like the untested GonaCon vaccine and IUDs.

The BLM’s ultimate goal? They want to reduce the populations for both of these HMAs to a devastating total of just 75 wild horses on 63,000 acres and 65,000 acres of land respectively. 

That’s one horse for every 800+ acres of land in these HMAs. Meanwhile, the agency will continue to permit thousands of privately-owned cows to graze on these public lands.

We refuse to stand by while the freedom of thousands of Oregon’s wild horses is stripped from them all to provide more land for commercially-owned cattle.

If you want to see Oregon’s wild horse populations protected, will you speak up for them right now? Please submit your comments to the BLM now telling them that you strongly oppose this disastrous roundup.

TAKE ACTION →

Thanks for all you do to protect America’s wild herds.

American Wild Horse Campaign

Wrangler Summer Bath 002

Wrangler’s Donkey Diary: Wrangler’s Summer Bath

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7-11-19

It was a perfect hot day for Wrangler’s yearly summer bath! We tried taking a “selfie” with a Canon camera and telephoto lens…not too bad for our first try!

He’s a real ham! He loves to smile for the camera and eat oats from the fanny pack.

Just tell him to and he perks his ears for the pictures! Wrangler is now an 11 year old gelding and softens my loss of Little Jack Horner in 2014!

Wrangler is so much like L.J.H. it’s crazy!

IMG 7764 Bea Mirage Hourglass 10 28 14

LTR Training Tip #61: Laterally Ground Driving the Hourglass

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Lateral ground driving should be done slowly and taken in a natural sequence. Learn how to progress from lateral driving along the rail to laterally ground driving in the Hourglass Pattern.

Download Detailed Description

See more Training Tips

Chilly Pepper – Great Grandma “Norma” – Will you Help her?

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Another emergency in the middle of “vetting the 46”.

I have been asked to give “GG Norma”, a chance. At the very least she deserves the best feed, love and care until she crosses over. However, even though two vet’s looked at her and didn’t give her much hope, she is telling a different story.

Her eyes are bright and she is alert and curious and says “PLEASE don’t quit on me!”

Will you help me give her the best love and care for whatever time she has left?

We are due for a Miracle, and I’m hoping you will help me give her a chance.

We have spent over $1400 on fuel so far but are all set up and ready to go. Hauling the squeeze from NV and moving horses is a large endeavor, but these amazing horses will have safe places to land because of it.

PLEASE HELP “Great Grandma NORMA”!

Thank you as always for all the love and support. I still need help to give our precious rescues the care and love they need. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR BEING PART OF OUR FAMILY AND FOR SAVING SO MANY LIVES!

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weonda Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Show wild burros some love as we finish out our Help A Horse Day festivities!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

So far this week we’ve shared stories with you that highlight just how critical our PZP Program and our Legal Funds are to protecting the freedom and the lives of America’s wild horses. Today, as we close out our National Help A Horse Day festivities, we wanted to show our cherished wild burros some love, too!

Over the next several months, approximately 2,500 wild burros will be targeted for removal by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Around 2,300 of these innocent animals will be sent to holding facilities, where many could be funneled into the slaughter pipeline via the BLM’s disastrous Adoption Incentive Program (AIP).

Our Rescue Fund helps us ensure we have the funds necessary to partner with organizations to rescue victims of the AIP who have ended up in the slaughter pipeline. Will you make a donation to fuel our Rescue Fund today so we can help save more wild horses and burros?

Meredith: Our Rescue Fund has helped us save over 100 wild horses and burros from the slaughter pipeline including the Oklahoma 12:

Last year, our investigative team documented these 12 burros sitting in an Oklahoma kill pen ready to ship to slaughter at any minuteWe used our Rescue Fund to assist our rescue partner Evanescent Mustang Rescue and Sanctuary to pay the bail for each of these 12 burros so they could quickly get out of this kill pen and into foster care.

After these animals were safe, we obtained their title paperwork. And Meredith, as we guessed — all 12 burros were adopted through the BLM’s AIP. Even worse, they were all adopted by one family who as soon as they got their incentive payments, flipped the 12 burros to slaughter.

Even though the Oklahoma 12 are now safe and in loving care, the BLM’s unprecedented attack on burro populations means an increasing number of BLM burros will be moving through the AIP and are at risk of entering the slaughter pipeline.

So, as we close out our Help a Horse Day festivities and more burro roundups rapidly approach, will you help us save more burros like the Oklahoma 12 with a donation to our Rescue Fund today?

FUEL OUR RESCUE FUND →

Thanks,

— AWHC Team

What Cirrus inspired:

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Happy National Help a Horse Day! 🐎

It’s hard to put into words just how important holidays like today are to our team at the American Wild Horse Campaign. To celebrate a national holiday specifically dedicated to protecting the animals we hold so close to our hearts means so much to our team who day in and day out carry on the fight to protect the lives and freedom of our wild herds.  

So today, as we celebrate a holiday meant to inspire the masses about the plight of our dearest equines, we wanted to tell you about Cirrus — a mare whose story continues to inspire each and every one of us at AWHC. 

In 2018, an AWHC field representative was on-site to report on the ongoing helicopter roundup and removal operations happening at the Warm Springs Herd Management Area in Oregon. There he saw the most extraordinary mare: 

PROTECT MARES LIKE CIRRUS →

Cirrus had the likeness of a horse imprinted on her neck. As she ran, chased by helicopters, the horse moved with her. To see something so beautiful in the most devastating of circumstances… was surreal, in a way that perfectly embodied the beauty of these innocent animals and the tragedy they are plagued by.

We managed to keep track of Cirrus while she was in holding, hoping to find her a forever home. However, we found that she was slated, along with a dozen other mares, to be a test subject for a surgical sterilization study — an unproven and brutal procedure with a high mortality rate.

When we found this out, we knew we had to continue fighting against these studies. So we joined forces with two of our partner organizations and filed a lawsuit to stop the barbaric surgeries from proceeding. And , we won. 

Thanks to donations made to our Legal Fund and our amazing legal team, we were able to make this court win a reality. Saved from an uncertain fate, Cirrus is living out the rest of her days at AWHC’s Board President Ellie Phipps Price’s 2,000-acre sanctuary, Montgomery Creek Ranch — the next best thing to being wild and free.   

So, this National Help A Horse Day, we’re asking you to make a contribution of whatever you can afford to fuel our Legal Fund to help us win more battles in the field, on the Hill, and especially in the courts to protect more horses like Cirrus.

FUEL OUR LEGAL FUND →

Thanks for your continued dedication to our wild horses and burros.

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

The countdown to National Help a Horse Day starts NOW!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Tomorrow, April 26, marks National Help A Horse Day — a day dedicated to bringing horse advocates like yourself together to protect America’s beloved equines and to spread awareness about the threats many of these cherished animals face. Help us celebrate with a donation today! >>

Here at the American Wild Horse Campaign, we’re kicking off this important day early, because there is just so much to cover when it comes to protecting America’s wild herds! We never stop fighting to preserve the freedom of mustangs and burros, so this week we wanted to share exactly how we are protecting these innocent animals and highlight some heartwarming stories from along the way!

Allow us to introduce you to Saddle Shoe.

HELP MORE HORSES LIKE SADDLE SHOE

Saddle Shoe is a 10-year-old pinto mare that lives on Nevada’s Virginia Range, a 300,000-acre habitat in the greater Reno area where we operate the world’s largest wild horse fertility control program! Through our documentation of the wild horses who call this area home, we have discovered that Saddle Shoe is the mother of at least 4 other mustangs who live wild and free!

The lands surrounding the Virginia Range are slowly being swallowed up by encroaching urbanization as commercial companies build offices and housing throughout their habitat. We started our PZP program on Nevada’s Virginia Range because we wanted to ensure horses like Saddle Shoe and her babies maintain their freedom on the lands they’ve called home for centuries.

Our work on the Virginia Range provides scientific evidence to the public and lawmakers that there is a humane way to manage wild horses that doesn’t require mass roundups, crowded holding pens, or dangerous sterilization surgeries.

One of the biggest wins from this groundbreaking program? The wild horses of the Virginia Range, like Saddle Shoe, get to stay together with their families, and in the wild just like they’re meant to be! 

So, Meredith, as we kickstart our Help a Horse Day celebration, we’re asking that you donate $30 or more if you can today — the cost to dart a mare with PZP — so that we can keep more horses like Saddle Shoe wild and free for years to come.

FUEL OUR PZP PROGRAM →

Thanks for your support,

– American Wild Horse Campaign

Chilly Pepper – URGENT 911 – 46 Lives at Stake – Can we turn heartbreak into inspiration and help the 46?

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

My heart is shattered as I write this. Although he fought valiantly and beat all the odds, our beautiful Norman is running free in heaven with his Mama. Sadly, Norman’s lungs were permanently damaged and he let me know when it was time to go. He was having seizures and was so weak he couldn’t always get up. His knees were buckling over and although his heart was pounding constantly and Doc said it sounded like he was trying to breathe through a straw, he was a happy, playful little boy.

Doc and I both knew it was coming, but that doesn’t lessen the devastation. She said he picked the right time. He was starting to suffer and that wasn’t fair. That little man lived and loved so fully in his short little life. Thank you for giving him that precious time.

So now IN HONOR OF NORMANI want to answer the 911 call I received yesterday. The horses shown are part of one of the worst neglect cases in Idaho. My rescue is not handling the rescue per say; due to the fact that we specialize in wild or unhandled horses, and our success in safely sorting, without injury, the 907 wild ones in South Dakota, I have been asked to come in as a consultant and help get the remaining 46 their Coggins so they can be picked up by their adopters.

This is the 2nd and LAST attempt to get their blood pulled. – WITHOUT COGGINS AND HEALTH CERTS, THEY CANNOT BE ADOPTED and we know what that means. Their lives literally depend on us getting this done!

We need approximately $5000 for this. We have to pull 2 trailers from NV, go to WA, then to Idaho, then back to WA. We are bringing the right equipment to insure this is doable. Fuel is going to be close to $1400? for the two rigs. I have to pay my crew and the folks back home watching the horses in NV. We are also going to be on this project for possibly 5 days, if not more.

Thank you as always for all the love and support. I still need help to give our precious rescues the care and love they need. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR BEING PART OF OUR FAMILY AND FOR SAVING SO MANY LIVES!

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weonda Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

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MULE CROSSING: Benefit of Organizational Skills

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By Meredith Hodges

People have often asked me how on earth can only three people—my daughter, my husband and myself—manage to prepare and show as many as 18 head of mules and donkeys for one show?! They say that we must be crazy, and maybe we are a little crazy, but a few simple rules of organization have made this possible.

The first consideration is the grooming of the animals themselves. Anyone who has had to body clip an animal knows how tedious and time-consuming this can be. Mule and donkey hair does not appear to grow back as quickly, nor as radically, as does horse hair, so you can clip your mule, or donkey, as far as 2-3 weeks in advance of your show and do touch up work just before the show. If you have no shows until summer, you may want to body clip in mid-April anyway. It is at this time that the winter hair begins to shed and the summer hair starts to come in. If you clip off the winter hair and blanket him for the remainder of the spring, the hair that grows in will be much more manageable than the heavy winter hair and will greatly reduce grooming time before the show.

Once the heavier coat is eliminated, a weekly grooming will keep his coat nicely maintained. Daily grooming before a show, or every other day, is even better. Each time you groom him before riding, check and clip as needed the muzzle hairs, around the eyes and ears, and around the coronet bands. Leave the hairs inside the ears to prevent irritation from bugs and flies, but trim the outside edges and backs of the ears. An ounce of corn oil in his feed daily will assure a healthy sheen in his coat on show day without the use of artificial highlighters. Trimming, or shoeing, your mule on a regular six-eight week schedule will assure that his feet will not need attending at the last minute. A routine vaccination, deworming, Coggins testing and a permanent brand inspection will make sure he is ready for transport to any show anywhere at any time. Then, all that remains to be done right before the show is minor clipping, bathing, and polishing hooves.

Each individual mule, or donkey, should have his own personal show halter and bridle for convenience. Driving animals should each have their own set of harness. This will help to reduce the time between tack changes while at the show.

Dress rehearsals before the show at home are quite beneficial. Prepare as if you are about to enter each class, one at a time. First, pick the clothing you will need to wear and store it in a designated place in your house. You do not have to actually wear them for the rehearsal. As you pick out the items, take note of the things that need to be cleaned or polished, and set them to the side of the rest of your other clothes.

Then, tack up your animal, checking each piece of equipment to make sure that it is in working order. Go ahead and practice the class. Then, as you unpack your mule, set the tack aside from the rest in your tack room for cleaning later. Do this for each animal in each class. Your animals will do better at the show if they get plenty of rest before the show, so it is wise to spend the day before the show cleaning your tack, clothes, and equipment. Before you begin to clean, load all the items into your trailer that are all ready to go without cleaning. Then, as you clean the remaining items, load them directly into the trailer as you finish them.

When the basic gear for you and your animal is loaded, make a checklist for feed, buckets, hoses, brushes, forks, brooms, and shovels, etc., that you will need for general care, load them, and check them off. When you have finished, lay out all the items that you will need for transport (i.e. sheets, blankets, shipping boots, etc.), so they are easily available. If you proceed in this manner, the risk of forgetting any important items is minimized. It is best to make sure that your trailer is fully loaded (except the animals) the night before you leave as this gives you overnight to think of anything you might have missed. Items such as your ice chest can be left until morning, or last minute, provided that you put them in a highly visible spot with a list of what is to be put in attached. Do not try to rely on your memory, as it will be clouded by the excitement and anticipation of the show.

If you are taking a number of mules and donkeys to the show, it is wise to bathe with soap at home the day before; then, cover the animal with a sheet or blanket and leg wraps. The day of the show, you would then only need to rinse, or vacuum, any excess dirt. This will minimize grooming time at the show.

Post the show schedule where you will be tacking up for each class and organize your clothing and equipment such that it is ready to go and easily accessible. Once the show actually begins, you will not have time to go hunting for misplaced items. Take note of your clothing changes and wear things that are easily changed. For instance, if your Western classes are before your English classes, you can wear your breeches underneath your Western slacks and chaps. Changing from English attire to Driving and Side Saddle attire is easily done by wearing your English clothing, then, simply change your headgear and add a lap rug for driving, or an apron for Side Saddle. Changes of your boots are pretty much optional, as English boots are easily hidden beneath properly fitting Western chaps and are appropriate footwear for English, Driving and Side Saddle.

If classes are spaced fairly close together and you are using more than one animal, it is wise to tack up the other animals ahead of time so they are ready to go. If you are using only one saddle for more than one animal, the other animals can still be bridled with the halter slipped over it, so they can be tied and waiting. Be sure to tie up the reins so they will not be chewed or stepped on. If you are using the same mule throughout the show, tacking and stripping should not be too time-consuming if your equipment is well organized.

Shows should be fun and exciting, but it can easily turn into a nightmare when things are out of place and chaotic. Make your motel and stabling reservations early and leave for the show well ahead of schedule to allow for breakdowns or other unforeseen emergencies. By all means, bring friends to help you, but give them a briefing and a list of jobs they can do. They won’t be much help if they have to keep asking what to do the day of the show! If you are going any distance at all, have your truck and trailer checked over thoroughly before you leave. There is nothing more frustrating than a major breakdown on the roadside with a trailer full of animals!

In summary, with routine grooming, farrier care, vet care, regular Coggins testing during the show season and permanent brand inspections, you can greatly reduce your show preparation time. Dress rehearsals, individual tack for each animal and organized loading will assure that all your tack and equipment will be readily available. Advanced motel and stabling reservations will afford you and your animals much needed rest when you arrive. Having your truck and trailer checked before you leave will make sure that you arrive in plenty of time. And, organization of tack and equipment when you do arrive will heighten the chances for an enjoyable and relaxing show!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1991, 2016, 2019, 2022 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

FWD: One final Earth Day ask of you

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Thank you so much for standing alongside us in the fight to protect America’s wild horses and burros this Earth Day and every day.

While we take some special time to celebrate today’s important holiday, I want you to know just how grateful the entire AWHC team really is for your continued dedication to protecting our beloved equines year-round.

I also wanted to make one final ask of you this Earth Day. As part of this special holiday, we’ve set a goal to recruit 50 new monthly donors to fuel our fight for America’s wild herds.

Allow me to explain — as you well know by now, preserving the freedom of our cherished wild herds is an ongoing battle. One that isn’t won overnight. So, recurring monthly donations help to keep us in the fight for our wild horses and burros throughout the entire year. Monthly gifts, no matter the amount, are critical to continuing our work on the Hill, in the courts, and in the field.

So, this Earth Day I’m asking: Will you join us as an AWHC monthly donor and continue to fuel our fight to protect our cherished wild herds year-round?

BECOME A MONTHLY DONOR

Thanks, Meredith.

— Suzanne

———- Forwarded message ———
From: American Wild Horse Campaign <contact@americanwildhorsecampaign.org>
Date: Fri, Apr 22, 2022 at 12:34 PM
Subject: 3 ways you can celebrate  Day AND protect wild horses and burros >>
To: <meredith@luckythreeranch.com>

Happy Earth Day! 

More than 50 years ago, Earth Day was created as a day to put all other issues aside and focus on the protection of our beautiful planet and all of the amazing creatures who call it home.

Every single day, our team sees firsthand the threats that wild horses and burros face — whether that be the dangerous adoption incentive program, brutal helicopter roundups, or the interests of the cattle industry superseding the needs of these innocent equines.

So this Earth Day, we can think of no better way to celebrate than by lifting up our voices together to protect wild horses and burros and the public lands these cherished animals call home! TAKE ACTION FOR WILD HORSES AND BURROS AND MAKE OUR VOICES HEARD →

Over the next 5 years, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is planning to conduct mass roundups and removals of over 100,000 wild horses and burros from across the West – more of these animals than even exist today! 

What has been framed as a plan for “necessary” population management, is no more than a thinly veiled attempt to appease the special interests of the livestock industry — an industry that has been lobbying Congress for decades so that ranchers may graze their personal animals on public lands for cheap. 

This is not a path forward, it’s a path toward ecological destruction. 

So, as we celebrate Earth Day today, we can think of no better way to commemorate this special holiday than by doubling down on our commitment to ensure that our cherished wild horses and burros remain free, in the wild on the public lands they call home. Here are 3 ways you can take action to support our wild herds today:

  1. Call on your members of Congress to support wild horse-friendly language in the FY23 Appropriations bill.Congress already took historic steps this year when it passed the FY22 spending bill to ensure the BLM utilizes up to $11 million to implement a fertility control vaccine program. Now, we’re calling for this historic move once again in the FY23 bill! Take action now to ensure humane management of our wild herds →
    2. Watch & share on social AWHC team members’ national interview with Samantha Bee from her political satire show, Full Frontal. Get ready to laugh and learn more about the plight of our wild herds.
    3. Purchase a KT Merry wild horse print. As part of an Earth Day special, KT is donating 30% of all print sales to AWHC to keep wild horses in the wild where they belong! Promo ends on 4/23.

While we may celebrate this important holiday just once a year, our fight to preserve the freedom of wild horses and burros never stops.

Thanks for continuing to stand by our side, Meredith, and happy Earth Day!

American Wild Horse Campaign

The Hourglass Pattern For Good Posture9

CHASITY’S CHALLENGES: The Hourglass Pattern for Good Posture: 4-14-20

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4-14-20

The “Hourglass Pattern” is an amazing therapeutic approach to conditioning that I have used with all of my equines of varying ages, sizes and breeds. It builds a foundation of symmetrical strengthening at the core involving the ligaments, tendons muscles and soft tissue that support the skeletal frame and promotes even wear of the cartilage between bones in the joints. It can prevent arthritis as the animals age. This is vital to your equine athlete’s health. Chasity and I open the gate to her rebalancing and rehabilitation exercises in the “Hourglass Pattern.”

The red “X’s” in the pattern represent the points where you are to halt, square up, reward and wait. This process becomes helpful as your equine learns to navigate gates properly and learns to wait patiently through repetition and consistency in your behavior. Always go through gates exactly the same way so your equine knows what to expect. Abrupt actions lead to chaos.

We want to promote self-carriage, so we do not hold the lead rope in the right hand when leading from the left side where it can subtlety cause movement in the head and neck from side to side, adversely affecting their balance. Rather, we hold the lead rope in the left hand when leading from the left side and in the right hand when leading from the right side. We lead from the inside of the arcs in direction through the pattern. Always, say the animal’s name, give the command to “Walk On,” look where you are going, point in the direction of travel with your other hand and walk in sync with the equine’s front legs. This facilitates good posture for both of you!

When negotiating the “Hourglass Pattern,” there is an internal pendulum that swings back and forth and comes to center each time the animal halts and is squared up. If you were to work only along straight lines there is an optical illusion that takes place along the perimeter and makes the animal’s body lean to the inside of the track, and when halted, they cannot find the center of balance. Every time you halt, square up your equine and reward with the crimped oats that you keep in your fanny pack around your waist (other “treats” will not work the same way!). Then wait until they finish chewing so they can settle into their perfect balance unobstructed.

As they progess, they learn to bend to the arc of the turns through their rib cage, carry their body erect in good posture supported by stronger ab muscles that round the back upward as they learn to give to the “Elbow Pull” such that it remains loose. When it is tight, they are simply having difficulty holding their good posture and lean on the “Elbow Pull” much like a beginning ballet dancer must use the bar on the wall. Many people think that you do your equine a favor by not putting a bit in their mouth, but you cannot affect their posture without one. The animals that are not bitted and schooled in good posture can have all kinds of postural issues as they age. Chasity is falling in and out of good posture because she is only in Week Three of her training. As she improves, she will be able to keep the “Elbow Pull” loose for longer periods of time until it is always loose.

As this way of moving and standing becomes more habitual, so does their comfort in these positions. When they rest, they will stand 4-square instead of with splayed legs, or a hip dropped and a foot cocked. They are happy and deliberate in their movements and good posture continues to improve until this become their new habitual way of moving and resting. You will see marked changes in their play and rest patterns while in turnout.

Adding rails to the center of the pattern keeps them attentive, alert and teaches exact hoof placement (hoof-eye coordination). As their movement becomes more deliberate and balanced, their confidence is increased as is their trust in you for making them feel so comfortable in their own skin. They learn to wait for your command  before moving. They look forward to their time with you and will gladly leave the herd to be with you! No more herdbound behaviors!

We build this foundation through the “Hourglass Pattern” first during leading training,  then after obstacles and lunging training during Ground Driving, and finally Under Saddle. Each stage produces new challenges to the equine’s body and mind that add to their overall development in a logical, sequential and healthy way. Because of all these small steps, with gradual difficulty, it is easy and fun for both you and your equine to do. You are never over-faced with difficulty and you learn to appreciate the little victories along the way! Chasity was somewhat of a pushy, bully to start with, but she now waits patiently when I ask and navigates movement in much better posture, even after only three short weeks! More dramatic changes to Chasity’s body and mind are still to come! It’s not just about the end result. It’s all about the journey!

 

Thank you, Volunteers, Gabby Who?, Big Day of Giving, and Boots & Bling, too

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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It’s National Volunteer Week!

It’s time to shine a lil’ light on all of AAE’s volunteers.

You make a difference for our horses every single day!

Through rain, sleet, and snow, and through the heat you go!

Day in and day out, you contribute more than you know.

Thank YOU for all you do,

YOU are making lives better, one horse at a time!

We are adjusting to many the many changes a new home brings. Unfortunately, it’s not all rainbows and roses… we recently had a positive strangles case with one of our lil ponies, Minnie. She’s been with us for quite some time (more than a year).

We have been on heightened alert with the recent EHM outbreaks in local areas, and we have been extra careful, so it’s really a surprise. In 13 years, we’ve never had a serious contagious disease, and we’ve worked had to keep it at that way!

Minnie was tested out of an abundance of caution due to a cough and fever, but never did we expect a positive result by any means. She’s been a healthy lil’ one from the start, and it’s unlikely she was previously exposed (though not ruled out as potential carrier). She’s doing very well now, and she’ll be scoped tomorrow to flush her gutteral pouches and re-test. You can learn more about Strangles, here.

We have implemented multiple protocols to minimize risk of further exposure, and we are working alongside our vet to keep this under control, as best we can. So far, we’ve had no new cases, an

We have NO idea where it came from. We are diligent with our quarantine practices. We haven’t had any new horses in for over six weeks, and last was a mare that was in quarantine for about six weeks w/a confirmed dental-related (localized) sinusitis issue. She came from a situation where she was the only horse around for 3 to 5 months and hadn’t been off that property.

We haven’t seen any concerns with any of the remaining horses, yet, though one other was tested at the same time with negative results. We are under quarantine until the coast is clear. No horses will be coming in or going out until we are as confident as we can be that we are Strangles-free.

We have not done kill pen rescues for over 10 years. We have not done auction rescue for many years (but haven’t eliminated that option entirely). We can only guess it came in with someone or something. We have had biosecurity measures in place for our volunteers with horses or those involved in horse activities due to the recent outbreaks, as well, so that is always possible, too, but not as likely.

We want you to be aware. We have also notified our volunteers and nearest neighbors with horses.

Free to email with questions, and we will respond as quickly as we can. Please remember, we are almost an entirely volunteer run organization, and right now, we are stretched. Stay healthy and safe, all, and thank you for your support and understanding during this time.

We welcomed Gabby earlier this year after being contacted by a nearby animal control who needed assistance with a skinny mare. Well, skinny was an understatement!

She arrived at AAE very underweight and with some other health concerns, too. In her time here, she has gained 90 lbs so far (and still gaining). She had a chronic sinus infection on her right side due to some dental problems. It’s looking like she will need one, maybe two teeth extracted.

She’s got a ways to go, but this girl’s looking so much better! Gabby’s such a sweetheart, and we look forward to seeing her become healthier and happier in this next chapter of her life!

If you’d like to help with her care, please consider making a one-time donation or sponsor her with a monthly donation.

Donate

Need a little refresher on Gabby’s background?

We were told by the animal control officer that the person who had her had rescued her a few months before, but he had cancer and was unable to afford veterinary care because of his own health care costs.

When we arrived to pick her up, we met a very sad, very emaciated, and very stinky (localized sinus infection) older gal. She had a nasty smelling discharge from her right nostril and below her right eye was a large crusty patch. Her teeth needed attention. Though her condition was quite grim, she was so kind and forgiving.

Based on the one-sided nasal and eye discharges, and odor, too, we suspected she had either a tooth infection, a sinus infection, or both. We also found a lip tattoo, but it wasn’t entirely legible. If we’ve guessed right, she was born in Minnesota in ‘98, never raced, and she’s registered as Timber Buck’s Luv.

Gabby is a luv! She loaded into the trailer readily, she traveled well, and she unloaded calmly. She handles easily, too. The sweet gal was vet checked shortly after arrival, blood was drawn, sinus/tooth infection confirmed, and antibiotics started. She had her dental done and some head radiographs, now we’re waiting for to put on a little more weight before surgery. In the meantime, she’s looking better, feeling better, and she’s getting a little sass about her….oh, she’s a mare!

3 ways you can celebrate 🌎 Day AND protect wild horses and burros >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Happy Earth Day! 🌎

More than 50 years ago, Earth Day was created as a day to put all other issues aside and focus on the protection of our beautiful planet and all of the amazing creatures who call it home.  

Every single day, our team sees firsthand the threats that wild horses and burros face — whether that be the dangerous adoption incentive program, brutal helicopter roundups, or the interests of the cattle industry superseding the needs of these innocent equines. 

So this Earth Day, we can think of no better way to celebrate than by lifting up our voices together to protect wild horses and burros and the public lands these cherished animals call home! TAKE ACTION FOR WILD HORSES AND BURROS AND MAKE OUR VOICES HEARD →

Over the next 5 years, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is planning to conduct mass roundups and removals of over 100,000 wild horses and burros from across the West – more of these animals than even exist today! 

What has been framed as a plan for “necessary” population management is no more than a thinly veiled attempt to appease the special interests of the livestock industry — an industry that has been lobbying Congress for decades so that ranchers may graze their personal animals on public lands for cheap. 

This is not a path forward, it’s a path toward ecological destruction. 

So, as we celebrate Earth Day today, we can think of no better way to commemorate this special holiday than by doubling down on our commitment to ensure that our cherished wild horses and burros remain free, in the wild on the public lands they call home. Here are 3 ways you can take action to support our wild herds today:

1. Call on your members of Congress to support wild horse-friendly language in the FY23 Appropriations bill. Congress already took historic steps this year when it passed the FY22 spending bill to ensure the BLM utilizes up to $11 million to implement a fertility control vaccine program. Now, we’re calling for this historic move once again in the FY23 bill! Take action now to ensure humane management of our wild herds →
2. Watch & share on social AWHC team members’ national interview with Samantha Bee from her political satire show, Full Frontal. Get ready to laugh and learn more about the plight of our wild herds.
3. Purchase a KT Merry wild horse print. As part of an Earth Day special, KT is donating 30% of all print sales to AWHC to keep wild horses in the wild where they belong! Promo ends on 4/23.

While we may celebrate this important holiday just once a year, our fight to preserve the freedom of wild horses and burros never stops. 

Thanks for continuing to stand by our side, and happy Earth Day! 🌎

American Wild Horse Campaign

LMVAugieSpuds

Longears Music Videos: Spa Day: Miniature Donkeys Augie and Spuds

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See more Longears Music Videos

THANK YOU to our volunteers!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Today marks the first day of National Volunteer Week. To honor this important week, we wanted to spotlight our fantastic volunteers who define AWHC — Animal-loving, Wonderful, Helpful, and Committed.

Our dedicated volunteers are the backbone of so much of our work, from implementing the world’s largest fertility control program for wild horses to playing an integral role in our investigation into the Bureau of Land Management’s Adoption Incentive Program. We could not be more grateful, so we wanted to share their stories as fearless defenders of our wild horses and burros, and then ask you to sign a thank you card for our volunteers!

Without their commitment and support, our work would not be possible!

SIGN THE CARD TO THANK OUR VOLUNTEERS

Once again, we want to give a big AWHC thank you to all of our amazing volunteers! If you want to find out how you can join our team, click here.

AWHC Team

WindyValleyAdamCC 1

MULE CROSSING: Choosing the Right Jack

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By Meredith Hodges

When choosing a jack to breed to your mares and jennets, there are many important factors to consider. Conformation is the most obvious, but size, type, disposition and genetics are equally significant. As a direct result of the donkey’s evolution our choices in jacks are considerably limited these days. In the days when donkeys were widely used as beasts of burden, conformational soundness was an important consideration in their ability to do physical work. Today, the donkey is not as widely used in this manner, becoming more of an owner’s pleasure animal. In some cases, he is simply another pet. As a result, not much care has been taken to preserve his conformational integrity, thus limiting the availability of true breeding stock.

Although the conformation of the ideal jack can only be approximated, you should always try to choose a jack that is as close to the ideal as possible for your breeding programs. (Perpetuating undesirable conformation traits will only compound future breeding problems.) The first conformational consideration is the jack’s overall balance and proportion. His torso should be well connected to the front and rear quarters, with plenty of width and depth from heart girth to the flank, which allows for maximum efficiency of the heart and lungs. The topline from the withers to the tail should be relatively straight, with only a gentle slope from the withers to the croup, and neither excessively long nor short-backed. A longish back is acceptable, provided there is not a lot of distance between the last rib and the point of the hip, as this causes weakness through the loins. The unusually short-backed jack does not have adequate lateral  and vertical flexibility in his movement. A rigidly straight back is discouraged, as is a back that sags too drastically in the middle (except in the case of an aged animal).

Proportionately, the jack should not be too narrow in the chest, through the rib cage and in the rear quarters—nor should he be too wide in these areas. These faults in proportion can interfere with his action, causing him to be “pin-toed” (splay-footed) or “pigeon-toed” (toed-in). The pin-toed jack will brush his knees and fetlocks together in deep footing, causing him to be a slow mover, or he may even cross his legs over one another, increasing the possibility of a fall.

The closest approximation to a 45-degree angle in the hips and shoulders is preferred, with an adequate balance of muscle and sinew in all four quarters. One of the most common faults in donkeys today is straight and slight shoulders and hips. The withers and croup should be even across the topline, and the jack with withers slightly higher than the croup is preferred over the opposite, as this could set the animal’s body weight too far on the forehand, making turns and stops more difficult. It could also increase the possibility of falling. The croup should be smooth and round over the rump, with a tail set neither too high nor too low.

The feet and legs of the jack are the foundation of his conformation. They should be straight and true, with flat bone and adequate angles at the shoulders, hips, stifles, and hock and fetlock joints. The foot should be trimmed and shaped to compliment the angles in his joints to maintain the good conformation that should be present in the four quarters of the animal. For example, on a jack with good shoulders, the slope of the pasterns should be parallel to the slope of the shoulders. When dropping a plumb line on the front legs, which should be neither too far forward nor too far underneath him, the plumb line should fall from the point of the withers to the ground, directly at the back of the front legs. When dropping a plumb line on the hind legs, it should fall from the base of the tail to the point of the hock, and straight down the back of the cannon bone to the ground.

As far as a donkey’s hoofs are concerned, the expression, “No foot, no donkey” is literally true. Faults such as buck-kneed, calf-kneed, tied-in at the knee, round bone, short straight pasterns, coon-footed, too-long cannon, sickle hocks, splay-footed, knock-kneed, bowlegged, pigeon-toed, broken forward or backward feet, or too straight through the stifle and hock are all serious faults and should be avoided when breeding. Being slightly cow-hocked behind can be overlooked, as this usually increases maneuverability. The hoof itself should not reflect a ribbed appearance — it should be smooth and inclined to look sleek and oily. Even on the donkey, the hooves should not be contracted, but well-sprung (although less sprung than a mule or horse), and supported with a well-extended, healthy frog. Donkeys have a multi-layered hoof wall that will shed off in the event of mild or even severe trauma to the coronet or hoof wall, so many donkeys exhibit a “peeling” or “scabbing” of the hoof wall. A jack with this damage to the hoof should be inspected carefully to determine the severity of the problem and the extent of possible weakness in the hoof itself. If it is a cosmetic problem, it can often be managed successfully by adding one ounce a day of Mazola corn oil to the diet. If it is a genetic problem, a jack with hoof problems should be avoided when breeding and should probably be castrated.

The head and neck of the ideal jack should be attractive and set-in correctly, giving an overall balanced look to the animal. He should have good length to the ears, neither too far forward nor too far back, so the poll is clearly apparent. His eyes should be set so they give him a maximum field of vision forward, backward and peripherally. The eyes should not be set too high nor too low, which would offset the overall balance of the head. He should have adequate width and fine enough bone in the head, to allow for plenty of space for the brain and internal organs of the scull cavity. The length of his head should compliment the balance of his body and taper to a smaller and delicate muzzle. His jaw should be straight and aligned, showing neither a parrot mouth (under bite), nor be undershot (over bite, or buck toothed). This is critical for feeding and nutrition. The slightly dished-face, straight-faced or Roman-nosed jack should not be ruled out, provided the other criteria are met. The neck should be set in so that it flows easily into the withers and has adequate length for the ability to bend and maintain balance. He should have neither a U-neck nor an excessively crested neck. It should not be too wide, or too narrow, and should tie into the throatlatch in a trim and flexible way.

The basic conformation for the breeding jack should be the same regardless of size, although there are specific considerations with regard to type and use. The jack generally contributes more to the thickness of bone in his offspring, but not necessarily to their height. Therefore, when breeding for saddle mules and donkeys, the more refined-boned Standard or Large Standard jacks are preferred. On the other hand, when breeding for a draft mule or donkey, you would want to preserve more thickness of bone and use a stockier jack, such as a Large Standard or Mammoth. Use the same guidelines when breeding for miniatures; stocky begets stocky and refined begets refined. When breeding for saddle mules, you may want to keep the refinement, so you would use a Standard or Large Standard jack to breed to a saddle horse mare. However, if you wish to have a pack mule that is not overly tall, you might then want to breed a Mammoth jack to a saddle horse mare.

The genetic pool is a very important consideration when breeding. A particular jack may be a beautiful specimen, but, regardless of how lovely and balanced he may be, he may possess genes that produce offspring with many conformation faults. Since donkeys have been so inbred, this can happen more frequently than you might imagine. When choosing a jack to breed to your mares and jennets, it is wise, if possible, to take a look at some of his offspring from different mares and jennets, so you can better assess his stronger traits and determine which traits appear to be pre-potent. If this is not possible, your alternative is to breed him with only the best mare or jennet you own, in order to increase the odds for positive traits to come through in the offspring. Sometimes you can try to compliment the mare with the jack, such as a long-backed mare with a short-backed jack to get a medium-backed mule, but this doesn’t always work. A reputable jack owner should have records to show how and what his jack has produced and be able to attest to the consistency of his jack’s production. Granted, in the past this was virtually impossible, but today we have the American Donkey & Mule Society registry (and other Longears registries), and many conscientious breeders who realize the importance of recording their breeding information, thereby giving us all a better understanding of Longears production. So, don’t be afraid to ask the breeder whatever questions you may have.

Disposition is of the utmost importance when choosing a jack. However, there is a difference between the jack’s natural instincts, his personality and his acquired personal attitudes, so you should learn to distinguish between a natural instinct, a distinctive personality trait and behavior that was the result of improper handling. I have found most donkeys to be quite cooperative and affectionate when patiently and fairly treated, but some can also be more obstinate about things than others. Remember, in addition to the inherited traits of the jack, it is the mare, or jennet, from which the offspring learns most of his behaviors while he is growing up. So learn to make educated choices concerning your breeding stock and, in order to maintain the integrity of the breed, use only jacks with the best conformation for breeding.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1986, 1991, 2012, 2016, 2020, 2021, 2022 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Photo Captions:

1) North Africa 1943 (Library of Congress)

2) Sire-Supreme Little Jack Horner and Meredith Hodges

3) Lucky Three Excalibur

4) Lucky Three Blue Baron

5) Standard Jack, Colorado D.J.

6) Foundation Sire Windy Valley Adam

7) Don Mode driving Foundation Sire Black Bart

IMG 7764 Bea Mirage Hourglass 10 28 14

LTR Training Tip #60: Ground Driving the Hourglass Pattern

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Ground driving the hourglass keeps you and your equine organized and in good posture. Watch Meredith show you how to get into sync with your equines using this pattern.

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Chilly Pepper – QUICK UPDATE – Tessa and Norman still need your help!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Hi,

Tessa is home safe. Thank you!! That was the easy part, “saving her from the slaughter truck” and transporting her to safety. However, now the real work and expenses begin.

Tessa is in much worse shape than we thought. She needs to gain at least a few hundred pounds, will need vet care for her teeth and serious farrier care. Her feet are horrific and she barely has her front right hoof at all. Her coat is rough and she is sad and was extremely depressed. However, she and Honey Bandit seem to have fallen in love across the road. So now we are already seeing less depression. PTL!

Hay prices are through the roof and it is imperative that I order more asap. It is about $7500 + to get a semi load of hay right now. We have a lot of special needs guys that love to eat.

Norman is still with us, although not doing so well. He looks PERFECT, is gorgeous and growing like crazy. Sadly, his lungs are not keeping up and it is causing his little heart to beat at an extremely high rate. He had a very bad seizure when I was leading him into the stall. He needs a miracle. The next step is x-rays to see how much damage he has in his lungs. His knees are always wobbling, he is shaky from the lack of oxygen, HOWEVER, inside his oxygen deprived body is a FIERCE little stallion, full of life and love.

Please say a prayer and if you’d like to help with his vet bill at Goldendale Veterinary Clinic, you can call 509-773-0369.

Thank you as always for all the love and support. I still need help to give our precious rescues the care and love they need. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR BEING PART OF OUR FAMILY AND FOR SAVING SO MANY LIVES!

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weonda Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Burro roundups are almost here, help us fight back!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Wild horse foaling season is underway, so from April to July, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has paused its wild horse roundups. Instead, it has set its sights on wild burros. The BLM is planning to roundup record numbers of burros starting on April 30th – one day before the start of Burro Awareness Month.

Over the next few months, the BLM aims to round up over 2,500 wild burros from five Herd Management Areas (HMAs) and permanently remove over 2,300. The largest operation will take place in the most genetically diverse burro herd, located in the Black Mountain HMA in Arizona where 1,120 wild burros will be permanently removed.

Even worse, the agency intends to use helicopters to chase these beloved animals into traps. This is a notable departure from primarily relying on bait trapping to capture burros.

AWHC field representatives will be on site at these burro roundups to hold the BLM accountable and our team will be working nonstop — on the Hill, in the courtroom, and on the range – to help save wild horses AND burros from inhumane helicopter roundups. But we need your help. 

Can you make a donation to ensure our team has the necessary resources to continue fighting back against the cruel roundup of wild burros?

HELP SAVE WILD BURROS

Unlike wild horses, who generally stay together during helicopter roundups and follow other horses into a trap site, wild burros are stoic animals and often stand their ground in the face of the helicopters, or scatter in an attempt to avoid capture. As a result, helicopter roundups can be even more brutal for burros. 

We are fighting for the West’s few remaining wild burros and we need your help. Please make a donation of $10, $25, or whatever you can afford to give today to help us continue our fight to save wild burros.

DONATE TODAY

Thank you,

– American Wild Horse Campaign

help us stop helicopter roundups >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

On April 26, 2022, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will hold a legally-mandated meeting on the use of helicopters and other motorized vehicles in wild horse and burro management. These meetings provide an important opportunity for public input into the BLM’s inhumane and costly wild horse and burro management program.

Before the meeting, would you please take a moment to send an email to the BLM expressing your concerns about the use of helicopters to round up and remove America’s wild horses?

Just yesterday, the BLM released its 2022 wild horse and burro population numbers showing a mere 4,000-animal reduction in the on-range population despite the agency’s removal and stockpiling of more than 13,000 wild horses and burros from the wild in 2021.

Why? Because roundups are not only inhumane, they also don’t work.

We’ve been saying it all along: the BLM must listen to the National Academy of Sciences, which clearly stated that the BLM’s helicopter management approach is “facilitating high rates of population growth on the range.” For 50 years, the agency has used this cruel and unsustainable method that has resulted in mass deaths and injuries during the operations, the highest number of wild horses in history in off-range holding facilities, and a price tag approaching $1 billion just since 2018. 

Please take one moment to voice your opposition to the use of helicopters to manage the West’s wild horse and burro herds.

The meeting will be held virtually on April 26, 2022, from 3 to 5 p.m. MT using Zoom video conferencing and live-streamed at BLM.gov/live. You will also have the ability to provide comments during the virtual public hearing, though you must register in advance by April 25.

Thank you for speaking up for our wild herds,

The AWHC Team

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