Monthly Archive for: ‘March, 2022’

BREAKING: The Biden Administration just released their proposed FY23 budget >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The Biden Administration just released its proposed Fiscal Year 2023 budget for the U.S. Department of the Interior and called for $153.1 million to fund the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Wild Horse and Burro Program. Meredith, that’s an increase of $16 million from the BLM’s approved FY22 program budget enacted earlier this month.

We’re disappointed to see the Biden Administration increase spending towards the BLM’s mismanaged programs, but compared to previous years, this increase is noticeably smaller — we’re hopeful that this marks a departure from the current mass round up and removal plan that would remove 100,000 wild horses and burros from public lands over the next five years.

So, we’re taking action. It’s time we start advocating for wild horse-friendly spending in the FY23 Appropriations bill to ensure the Biden Administration and our leaders in Congress enact a pro-horse agenda for the next year.

Congress already took historic steps this year when it passed the FY22 omnibus spending bill to ensure the BLM utilizes up to $11 million to implement a robust fertility control vaccine program for the remaining months of this year.

We know these vaccines are the best alternative way to manage horses in the wild, and that’s why we’re advocating for the same historic funding to be allocated in the FY23 spending bill. Will you call on your members of Congress and join us in this fight today?

TAKE ACTION

While there were aspects of Congress’ omnibus that were disappointing, the $11 million secured this year was the first time that Congress had directed the BLM to utilize scientifically-proven fertility control. And, that is a victory worth celebrating!

Meaningful implementation of a robust fertility control vaccine program means the BLM can’t afford to ignore the science. Our federal officials and BLM leadership will see once and for all that in-the-wild management works and means fewer removals for our wild herds.

But to ensure fertility control is prioritized, we must secure ongoing funding, which is why we need your help today. Will you call on your members of Congress to support $11 million in humane fertility control vaccine treatments in the FY23 spending bill?

TAKE ACTION

Thank you,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

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MULE CROSSING: The Rein Back

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By Meredith Hodges

Many common horse training techniques used today work well on either horses or mules. However, being creative and using less technique with a more logical approach to training works better with donkeys. In the case of the “rein back,” the problems are universal. Some equines seem to “rein back” more easily than others. Similarities exist within the equine species regarding personality types, but there are also differences in environmental behavior during training. Horses that are resistant to backing either shake their heads violently from side to side or rear up and try to throw themselves over backwards. Resistant mules try to walk sideways or forward, and resistant donkeys are either stone statues or terrific “leaners.” All of these tendencies are an expression of discomfort in the equine and can pose serious problems for the trainer.

In order to get the best results, before teaching an equine to “rein back” you must understand the animal’s body mechanics and his mental attitude. The “rein back” is a reverse, two-beat, diagonal gait. When executing a straight “rein back,” the equine is unable to see what is directly behind him, but he can see peripherally on both sides. Because of the way the eyes are set in their head, mules can actually see all four feet when facing straight forward where a horse cannot. The depth perception of an equine is questionable at best, but when an equine must “rein back,” his vision is even more impaired because he can’t see directly behind him. This causes him to become tense because the equine must trust the trainer not to back his precious little rear into anything that might hurt him! If the trainer has been even a little abusive in the past, the equine will not be able to trust and will become resistant. On the other hand, if the animal has been brought along well and is being asked to “rein back” on the long lines, he may simply not want to “back over” the trainer. This could be perceived as disobedience when it is only consideration for the trainer.

In order to execute a straight and smooth “rein back,” the equine must be able to lower his head, round his back and step back and underneath himself easily with the power initiated from his hindquarters. If the rider has not prepared his equine for the “rein back” by allowing the animal to take one step forward first and round under his seat, the animal will be resistant. This is why one step forward before executing a “rein back” is essential. Otherwise, the equine may raise his head and hollow his back, making it very difficult, at best, to perform the “rein back.” If you have trouble visualizing this, get on your hands and knees and try it yourself to see how it feels, first with a hollowed back and then with an arched back.

Before you begin to “rein back,” take that extra couple of seconds to relax and prepare your animal. First, let him take one step forward. Then, alternately, squeeze your reins and ask him to lower his head a little (not too much at first). Keep your legs snugly hugging his barrel, and lift your seat ever so slightly by leaning forward just a little. Check over your shoulder to be sure that he won’t back into anything. Then, with corresponding rein and leg cues, squeeze and release alternately from side to side: first, right rein, right leg; then, left rein, left leg. By pulling first on one side and then the other, you actually allow him to see more directly behind, thus eliminating much of the apprehension that he feels when he cannot see. Pretend that you are pushing him backward with your legs, directly after giving a gentle tug on the corresponding rein. In the beginning, be satisfied with one or two steps, and don’t forget to praise him.

Do this exercise in a two-beat fashion, with the squeeze/release action on the rein coming only a split second sooner than the corresponding leg. This prevents the hindquarters from resisting, and it is here where most resistance in backing originates. If you pull both reins at the same time, the hindquarters are not affected and this may cause considerable resistance. Animals that learn to “rein back” correctly will eventually learn to “rein back” on a mere tug of the reins and a shift of your body weight, but that is not the way to begin. Speed comes much later.

Horses and mules learn to “rein back” more easily than donkeys. As far as donkeys are concerned, why go backward when you can turn around to go forward? Because donkeys have a natural agility, this is not such a far-out way for them to think. However, if a donkey tried to turn around on a narrow trail with a rider aboard, his balance could be severely affected. Chances are, the donkey would make it, but the rider might not. The donkey needs to learn to “rein back” on command, because safety is of the utmost importance.

The simplest way to encourage your donkey to “rein back” is to ride or drive him into a three-sided tie stall, or anywhere that he has no way to escape but backward. Ask him to “rein back” with the cues outlined, and praise him for each step backward. If you are ground driving, just alternate long line pressure while you step backwards in unison with his back legs. Keep your squeeze/release action on the long lines minimal—pulling on your donkey’s mouth too much will only defeat your purpose. If your donkey is hitched to a vehicle, make sure that the weight of the cart or carriage that he has to push is not too heavy for him to manage. Adjust the breeching tightly enough so that your donkey can lean into it with his rear, and be sure that it is not so low that it will inhibit the motion of his upper hind legs.

If you have checked all of these factors and your donkey still will not back out of the stall, ask someone to act as your assistant, and have them wave a fearful object (such as a brightly colored scarf or plastic bag) low and in front of your donkey. He should dip his head to focus on the object (arching his back) and begin to “rein back,” apply the proper squeeze/release cues and after a few steps, reward him. You have set up a situation in which you can predict that his reaction will be the correct one. Once he has done this a few times, he should begin to make the connection between your cues and his action. Always keep your cues gentle, but clear. Be prepared to immediately praise those first one or two steps, and don’t ask for too many steps too soon. Just as an animal is conditioned to perform any other maneuver, his body must also be conditioned to “rein back.” Doing a “rein back” without conditioning the muscles that will be used can cause injury. Taking it slowly and cautiously diminishes the chance for resistance. Work up your speed in the “rein back” only after your equine is backing straight and easily. When he has had time off, be sure to take the time to recondition those muscles before again asking for speed.

I can’t count the hours that I have spent sitting on-board my donkey, waiting for a foot to move, giving the cue to just one side over and over again. Patience is the key to success with any animal, but with donkeys, it’s a necessity. Be patient and deliberate with your training. Don’t get upset, and don’t try to be forceful. Remember, he has to move sometime. Even donkeys get bored standing in one place for too long!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2014, 2016, 2017, 2022 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

This article is an excerpt from the book, Training Mules and Donkeys by Meredith Hodges, 2014

 

ACT NOW: Keep wild burros OUT of the skin trade

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has grounded its helicopters for foaling season, but unfortunately this break only applies to our nation’s wild horses. The agency has turned its focus to wild burros and over 2,000 are in the agency’s crosshairs.

The BLM continues to press on with an aggressive plan to remove at least 19,000 wild horses and burros from federal lands this year. And since burros do not have a designated birthing season in the same way that wild horses do, the BLM plans to continue on with its round-ups, targeting thousands of burros for removal starting in just a few short weeks.

The repercussions for captured wild burros are especially devastating. The increasing number of BLM-branded burros that are arriving in kill pens and livestock auctions has raised serious concerns about burros being exported for slaughter. Some may even become victims of the donkey skin trade for the production of ejiao, medicinal gelatin that is made from boiling the hides of these animals.

Each year, millions of donkeys are brutally slaughtered for the production of ejiao. The donkey skin trade is now decimating global donkey populations — and every federally protected burro at a slaughter auction could be in danger of entering that trade.

We have a chance to stop this pipeline in its tracks. The Ejiao Act (H.R. 5203), has been introduced in the House of Representatives and would ban the knowing sale or transportation of ejiao made using donkey skin, or products containing ejiao made using donkey skin, in interstate or foreign commerce.

Will you contact your elected officials and ask them to sign on in support of this important bill?

TAKE ACTION

The BLM’s increasingly aggressive roundup strategies are putting more wild horses and burros in holding every year. And the agency’s Adoption Incentive Program (AIP) is funneling unseen numbers of these federally protected animals into the slaughter pipeline.

This isn’t an isolated issue — we’re seeing an uptick in the number of burros dumped in kill pens across the country that’s consistent with the start of the AIP and the increase in demand for ejiao too.

We need you to stand up for America’s wild burros. Will you contact your representatives and ask that they co-sponsor and support the Ejiao Act (H.R. 5203) today?

Thanks for your support,

AWHC Team

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Wrangler’s Donkey Diary: Second Lesson Day

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6-4-18

Even though Wrangler is nearing ten years old in this post, and has been ridden before, my approach to training is always the same way with all of my animals…as if they have never been trained. They need the highly structured Core Strength Leading Exercises in the Hourglass Pattern first, followed by adding Coordination over and through obstacles, straight through them to oversome fear and build confidence, and later, broken down into very small Balancing tasks. Once they have solidified their good posture and ideal body carriage, only then are they ready to begin work in the Round Pen. Wrangler completed his Leading Exercises in the Hourglass Pattern and will do more work there, but for the sake of variety to his routine, I opted to graduate him to some work in the Round Pen. In this post, you will also see how we deal with spring shedding effectively and how we get tack and equipment to fit nicely for good health and optimum performance.

Simple hairbrush bristles remove more undercoat

 

The loose hair on top scrapes off easily

 

Place girth 4 inches from forearm

 

Lossen crupper strap & insert tail

 

Adjust snugly, but not tight

 

Much improved walking in sync

 

Proper turn through the gate

 

More impulsion & flexibility at walk left

 

First offer to trot easily

 

Begin reverse

 

Improved posture & balance at walk right

 

Offer to trot right

 

Hindquarter engagement before halt

 

Improved in sync back to work station

 

Slide saddle back to loosen crupper – learns to stand quietly

 

Remove saddle

Bristles are longer which is enough to get it all

 

No more shedding blade hair breakage

 

Adjust back girth snug enough to hold the saddle down

 

Scratch rear for relaxation of the tail

 

Place saddle over the center of balance

 

Patient while opening gate

 

Improved gate posture

 

Improved posture & balance at walk left

 

Beginning to find his balance

 

Complete reverse on correct pivot foot

 

Improved posture & balance at walk right

 

Finding balance at trot right

 

We did GOOD!

 

Remove bridle & put on halter

 

Slide crupper off tail

 

Back to the barn IN SYNC!

Mule Ing Around

Longears Music Videos: Mule-ing Around: Jasper and Kids

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See more Longears Music Videos

Celebrating Women’s History Month by remembering Wild Horse Annie

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

March is Women’s History Month, a time of year when we pay homage to all the incredible accomplishments and contributions women have made to our nation’s rich history. In that spirit, we would like to take this opportunity to honor Velma B. Johnston, better known as “Wild Horse Annie.”

Velma Johnston was born in Reno, Nevada in 1912. She grew up around horses from an early age since her father used them for his freighting service. When she was 11 years old, she tragically caught polio — the experience left a huge impact on her and made her very empathetic to the suffering of animals. After she recovered, she devoted her time to caring for the animals on her father’s ranch. 

One morning while on her way to work, Velma witnessed an appalling scene — a trailer filled with bloodied, injured wild horses recently captured from Nevada’s Virginia Range. Bravely, Velma followed the truck to its final destination, a slaughterhouse. After this experience, she learned that  “mustangers” — usually ranchers and hunters — were capturing wild horses for commercial slaughter using airplanes and trucks, often with no regard for the injuries they caused. Velma was horrified. 

Once she saw the brutality, she could not ignore it. From that day forward, she dedicated her life to stopping the inhumane treatment, abuse, and slaughter of wild horses. 

Velma organized a huge grassroots campaign to put an end to these devastating practices, driving national attention to this issue. Her efforts were successful and resulted in the passage of the Wild Horse Annie Act of 1959. This Act prohibited the use of motorized vehicles to hunt wild horses and burros on all public lands, but it did not include her recommendations for federal protection and management of the wild horse population. So, Velma kept fighting in Washington. 

She inspired thousands of school children to write letters to their elected officials and even testified before Congress herself! After another decade of advocacy, Congress finally passed the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, the significant and influential piece of legislation that is credited with saving the West’s iconic wild horses and burros from total eradication. 

Wild Horse Annie’s story is a testament to the strength and resilience of women everywhere. She fought fiercely for a cause that she deeply believed in and left behind a legacy of compassion for the majestic animals we continue our fight to protect.

So this Women’s History Month, we wanted to recognize Velma Johnston and share with you the hard-working and dedicated women of AWHC who are honored to carry on her legacy to preserve the freedom of our cherished wild herds.

Through each and every one of us, the work of Wild Horse Annie lives on.

– American Wild Horse Campaign

Chilly Pepper – NORMAN UPDATE – Norman is still fighting for his life – Will you help him?

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Norman is a miracle so far. He survived the deadly Colostrum and received 2 blood transfusions, but is far from out of the woods.

Thank you to everyone who made that possibleHowever, it looks like he is taking a turn for the worse. He still has pneumonia and heart issues, but his urine is once again showing extreme issues, and he could be starting to shut down.

He is on different antibiotics at this time, but obviously something else is needed to save him.

He needs to go back to Goldendale Veterinary to get updated blood tests.

I need to pay the $1500 +/- that we already incurred for the Plasma transfusion, the blood work for Ms. Kisses and Kimmy, and the Coggins etc.

If you would like to help me get Norman the blood tests he so needs to give him a chance to recover, please help us now. He is feeling worse today.

Thank you for helping us help him.

Goldendale Veterinary – 1-509-773-0369

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weonda Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Introducing…

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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INTRODUCING…

Thank you to everyone who participated in our name auction last week!

The winning bid was made by Nick C. and he picked the name Ballerini (after Kelsea Ballerini) and it fits her perfectly. Thanks, Nick!

Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Instagram if you don’t already. We will be sharing many videos and photos of this adorable lady, for sure.

Ballerini’s Story

In June 2021, we took in two reported pregnant mares as part of a nearby animal services case involving multiple animals. Shortly after arrival, our vet came for exams and ultrasounds. One showed a foal, the other did not. Dr. Stolba estimated mom-to-be was three to four months along, which meant baby was due in February or March. Fast-forward to February 22, 2022 (2/22/22), and mama gave birth to a beautiful filly!

Baby girl is healthy and so is mom. Mom has great maternal instincts, and she is the protector extraordinaire. They have bonded well, and they are doing great.

Meet Our Newest Mare

At the end of February, we were contacted by a nearby animal control who needed assistance with a skinny mare. No one had any background on her. We were told the man who had her had rescued her a few months before, but he had cancer and was unable to afford veterinary care because of his own health care costs.

When we arrived to pick her up, we met a very sad, very emaciated older gal. She had a nasty smelling discharge from her right nostril and below her right eye was a large crusty patch. Her teeth needed attention, too. Though her condition was quite grim, she was so kind and forgiving.

Based on the nasal and eye discharge and odor, we suspected she had either a tooth infection or sinus infection, or both. We also found a lip tattoo, but it wasn’t entirely legible. If we’ve guessed right, she was born in Minnesota in ‘98, never raced, and she’s registered as Timber Buck’s Luv.

She is a luv! She loaded into the trailer readily, she traveled well, and she unloaded calmly. She handles easily, too. She was immediately placed in quarantine as we always do with new intakes. The sweet gal was vet checked shortly after arrival, blood was drawn, sinus/tooth infection confirmed, and antibiotics started. This luv needs to gain some weight and stabilize a bit before she can be sedated to have her teeth checked/floated, radiographs, and possible nasal scope.

Despite her past, she’s a beautiful girl, and we look forward to seeing her blossom.

If you’d like to help us give her a happier and healthier life, please consider making a donation on her behalf.

 

 

 

Donate

Important information on the recent outbreak of

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) in California

If you haven’t heard, there has been an outbreak of Equine Herpes Virus-1 (EHV-1) and Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM, which is EHV-1 infection with neurological signs) in California.

If you have horses, are around horses, and/or volunteer at AAE, it’s important to understand how EHV can be transmitted and how to prevent the disease from spreading. See the following information shared from Loomis Basin Equine Medical Centers FB page:

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) has been detected in multiple horses in several counties in California since February.

Equine herpesvirus causes respiratory disease, abortion, neonatal death, and the neurological disease EHM. It spreads in aerosolized secretions, by direct contact, and by contact with surfaces containing infected secretions. Shedding of the virus generally occurs for 7-10 days.

Horse owners must immediately isolate any horses exhibiting neurologic signs and consult their veterinarian; EHM has mandatory State reporting requirements. Owners must practice good biosecurity when they move horses in emergency situations or for veterinary care; avoid other horses and don’t share tack/equipment that hasn’t been properly cleaned and disinfected, including farrier and veterinary equipment.

Additional information on EHM, including updates on current EHV-1 cases and a map of affected areas, please visit the CA Animal Health Branch webpage. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your vet.

Source: Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center

Time Is Running Out!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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Only a couple hours left to bid

for your chance to name this cute girl !

If you’d like to pick her name, hurry over to our Facebook page to place your bid! The auction closes TODAY at 5pm PT!

Not only will you get to pick her name, you’ll also help cover the costs of her basic care.

How It Works:

Bidding begins Wednesday, March 16 at 9am PT and closes Sunday, March 20 at 5pm PT.

Once the auction opens, the auction post will be pinned to the top of AAE’s Facebook page.

Comment the dollar amount you would like to bid. (Bidding starts at $10). Please do NOT include your name in the comments.

If you out bid someone, please tag them to let them know in the comment with your bid.

Highest bid at closing on March 20, 2022 at 5p wins! This person will be able to select Filly’s name. ***The name should follow AAE’s naming convention, which is a country artist inspired name, and it cannot be a name already used for a current or former AAE horse. AAE has final approval of the name.

We will contact the winner after the auction to finalize the name choice.

In case you missed her story when we shared it earlier this week…

 

In June 2021, we took in two reported pregnant mares as part of a nearby animal services case involving multiple animals. Shortly after arrival, our vet came for exams and ultrasounds. One showed a foal, the other did not. Dr. Stolba estimated mom-to-be was three to four months along, which meant baby was due in February or March. Fast-forward to February 22, 2022 (2/22/22), and mama gave birth to a beautiful filly!

Baby girl is healthy and so is mom. Mom has great maternal instincts, and she is the protector extraordinaire. They have bonded well, and they are doing great.

Important information on the recent outbreak of

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) in California

If you haven’t heard, there has been an outbreak of Equine Herpes Virus-1 (EHV-1) and Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM, which is EHV-1 infection with neurological signs) in California.

If you have horses, are around horses, and/or volunteer at AAE, it’s important to understand how EHV can be transmitted and how to prevent the disease from spreading. See the following information shared from Loomis Basin Equine Medical Centers FB page:

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) has been detected in multiple horses in several counties in California since February.

Equine herpesvirus causes respiratory disease, abortion, neonatal death, and the neurological disease EHM. It spreads in aerosolized secretions, by direct contact, and by contact with surfaces containing infected secretions. Shedding of the virus generally occurs for 7-10 days.

Horse owners must immediately isolate any horses exhibiting neurologic signs and consult their veterinarian; EHM has mandatory State reporting requirements. Owners must practice good biosecurity when they move horses in emergency situations or for veterinary care; avoid other horses and don’t share tack/equipment that hasn’t been properly cleaned and disinfected, including farrier and veterinary equipment.

Additional information on EHM, including updates on current EHV-1 cases and a map of affected areas, please visit the CA Animal Health Branch webpage. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your vet.

Source: Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center

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MULE CROSSING: LTR Training Principles and Philosophy

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By Meredith Hodges

No training series would be complete without examination of the principles and philosophy behind the training techniques. The philosophy of my training techniques is based on the principle that we are not, in fact, training our equines. In fact, we are cultivating relationships with them by assigning meaning to our own body language that they can understand.

Since our own level of understanding changes and grows over time, we must assume that so does that of our animals, and we must gauge our explanations accordingly. In the beginning, the emotional needs of the young equine are quite different from that of an older animal. They need to overcome a lot of instincts that would protect them in the wild, but are inappropriate in a domestic situation. In this case, our focus must be on developing friendship and confidence in the young animal, while establishing our own dominance in a non-threatening manner.

We do this through a lot of positive reinforcement in the beginning, with gentle touch, reassuring voice, and lots of rewards for good behavior. Our expressions of disapproval are kept at a minimum. As he grows with us, the equine will realize that we do not wish to harm him, and will next develop a rather pushy attitude in an attempt to assert his own dominance – once that he is confident that his behavior is acceptable. When this occurs, we must re-evaluate our reward system and save excessive praise for the new things as he learns them and allow the learned behavior to be treated as the norm, praised more passively, yet appreciated. This is the cultivation of a delicate concept of give and take in a relationship from the emotional standpoint. As in any good relationship, we must learn to be polite, considerate and respectful of our mules, donkeys, horses, ponies and hybrids. After all, as my grandmother used to say, “You can catch more flies with sugar that you can with vinegar!”

From the physical standpoint, there are also a lot of things to consider of both mule and trainer. In the beginning, unless you are a professional trainer with years of proper schooling, you are not likely to be the most balanced and coordinated of riders, lacking absolute control over your own body language. By the same token, the untrained equine will be lacking in the muscle coordination and strength to respond correctly to your cues that guide him to perform certain movements. For these reasons, we must modify our approach to fit each new situation and modify again to perfect it, keeping in mind that our main goal is to establish a good relationship with our equine and not just to train him! It is up to the trainer to decide the cause of any resistance, and to modify techniques to temper that resistance – be it mental or physical.

For instance, we had a 3-year-old mule learning to lunge without the benefit of the round pen. The problem was that she refused to go around you more than a couple of times without running off. Assess the situation first by brainstorming all the probable reasons she might keep doing such an annoying thing. Is she frightened? Is she bored? Is she mischievous? Has she been calm and accepting of most things until now? And most important, is my own body language causing this to occur?

Animals are all quite different, as are humans, and each individual will learn in his own way, as do humans. Once in a while, you meet an animal that is not able to learn things in a conventional manner. He perceives things just differently enough to make it extremely difficult. In the case of the mule that would not lunge independently on the line, we found that she needed additional learning aids. You can either put a round pen around the animal to “force” him to comply, or you can wait until he is broke to saddle before you try to lunge him again with just the line. If you only have an arena, you can lunge the equine in the corner and the two fenced sides will help him to stay on the circle. This certainly helped her!

I have worked with many mules that wouldn’t lunge first, but would ground-drive and accept a saddle and rider with no problem. After this they seem to lunge quite easily! Learn to be fair and flexible in your approach to problems as you would for anyone you were interested in getting to know. Be firm in your own convictions, but be sensitive to things that can change and be willing to make those changes as the occasion arises!

As mental changes occur, so do physical changes. As muscles develop and coordination gets better, the animal will gain confidence. As a trainer, you will need to do less and less to cause certain movements. For example, in the case of the leg yield, you may have to turn your mule’s head a little in the opposite direction to get him to step sideways and forward. As he becomes stronger, more coordinated, and understands your request, you can then begin to straighten his body more with less effort. Granted, we have begun by doing this the wrong way, yet we have put our mule “on the road” to the right way. We have assimilated an action in response to our leg that can now be perfected over time. In essence, you have simply said, “First you learn to move away from my leg, then you can learn to do it gracefully!”

The same concept works in the case of the trainer, or rider. Sometimes you must do things that are not quite right in the beginning to get your own body to assimilate correctness. As I have said, we all perceive things a little differently and it depends on how we are introduced to something whether or not we can understand or perform it. It is nearly impossible for the inexperienced horseman to perceive and control unused seat bones as a viable means of control of the equine. In the beginning, reins and legs are much easier to use to complete such a task.

In training horses and mules, there is really little difference in one’s techniques or approach, provided we maintain patience and understanding and a good rewards system. The major difference between these two equines is their ability to tolerate negative reinforcement, or punishment. The mule, being part donkey, does not tolerate punitive action very well unless he is fully aware that the fault was his own and the punishment is fair. For instance, you ask for a canter lead and your mule keeps trotting, one good smack with the whip, or one good gig with the spurs, is negative reinforcement that will bring about the desired response, but be careful of an over-reaction from an overdone cue. More than one good smack or gig could cause either a runaway or an extremely balky animal. This kind of resistance comes from the donkey and requires a much different approach when training donkeys. The horse part of the mule allows us an easier time of overcoming this type of resistance in mules, making them different and easier to train than donkeys.

It is the innate desire of all humans to control their own lives both emotional and environmental. When we cannot, we become panicked and confused about our situation. We doubt ourselves, our abilities, and our self-worth. If we do not maintain a sense of humor about those things that we cannot control and learn to accept that which we cannot change, we are doomed to a life of depression and failure. Horses can be controlled and even some mules can be controlled for the most part, but it is my experience that donkeys are only controlled when they so desire.

Donkeys are affectionate, amicable characters, and possess such a sensitive nature that one would think punishment a real deterrent from bad behavior – but when you punish a donkey, you will be met with a tough hide and unbelievable avoidance behaviors which often cause more resistance than it’s worth! As if this isn’t enough, if you do punish your donkey for something, the next time he even comes close to the same action, he may anticipate your punishment and go straight to the avoidance behavior before he actually makes the mistake. For this reason, it is better to try to ignore the mistakes, focus on the successes and reward the equine with lots of praise. If something in your training isn’t really necessary to your final objectives and you encounter this resistance, such as I did during lunging training, then just drop it and go on to something else that they can do easily. There is plenty of time to learn it at a later date.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1989, 2016, 2018, 2019, 2022 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

What Will You Name Her?

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

This adorable baby girl was born at AAE on 2/22/22. She and mom are both happy and healthy. We’ve enjoyed watching them bond and seeing baby learn and grow over the past few weeks. (Read more about their story below.)

Baby girl doesn’t have a name yet because we’d like your help picking one for her!

We’re auctioning naming rights right now! You’ll be able to pick her name AND help cover some of her basic care costs.

If you’d like a chance at choosing her name, visit our Facebook page before this Sunday at 5pm to place your bid!

How It Works:

Bidding begins Wednesday, March 16 at 9am PT and closes Sunday, March 20 at 5pm PT.

Once the auction opens, the auction post will be pinned to the top of AAE’s Facebook page.

Comment the dollar amount you would like to bid. (Bidding starts at $10). Please do NOT include your name choice in the comments.

If you out bid someone, please tag them to let them know in the comment with your bid.

Highest bid at closing on March 20, 2022 at 5p wins! This person will be able to select Filly’s name. ***The name should follow AAE’s naming convention, which is a country artist inspired name, and it cannot be a name already used for a current or former AAE horse. AAE has final approval of the name.

We will contact the winner after the auction to finalize the name choice.

Baby Girl and Mama’s Story

In June 2021, we took in two reported pregnant mares as part of a nearby animal services case involving multiple animals. Shortly after arrival, our vet came for exams and ultrasounds. One showed a foal, the other did not. Dr. Stolba estimated mom-to-be was three to four months along, which meant baby was due in February or March. Fast-forward to February 22, 2022 (2/22/22), and mama gave birth to a beautiful filly!

Important information on the recent outbreak of

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) in California

If you haven’t heard, there has been an outbreak of Equine Herpes Virus-1 (EHV-1) and Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM, which is EHV-1 infection with neurological signs) in California.

If you have horses, are around horses, and/or volunteer at AAE, it’s important to understand how EHV can be transmitted and how to prevent the disease from spreading. See the following information shared from Loomis Basin Equine Medical Centers FB page:

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) has been detected in multiple horses in several counties in California since February.

Equine herpesvirus causes respiratory disease, abortion, neonatal death, and the neurological disease EHM. It spreads in aerosolized secretions, by direct contact, and by contact with surfaces containing infected secretions. Shedding of the virus generally occurs for 7-10 days.

Horse owners must immediately isolate any horses exhibiting neurologic signs and consult their veterinarian; EHM has mandatory State reporting requirements. Owners must practice good biosecurity when they move horses in emergency situations or for veterinary care; avoid other horses and don’t share tack/equipment that hasn’t been properly cleaned and disinfected, including farrier and veterinary equipment.

Additional information on EHM, including updates on current EHV-1 cases and a map of affected areas, please visit the CA Animal Health Branch webpage. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your vet.

Source: Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center

From the field ➡️ to Congress and the court

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We’ll be the first to admit that protecting America’s wild horses and burros is no easy feat.

The weather conditions at roundup observation sites can be particularly harsh, the time spent preparing for legal battles can go into the late hours of the night, and sometimes we feel like broken records combatting the misinformation spread by the cattle industry to Congress.

But we know — how we feel in these uncomfortable moments, pales in comparison to the pain our cherished wild horses and burros feel when they are chased into traps, breaking family bands apart and costing them their freedom forever.

We’re on a mission to preserve the freedom of wild horses and burros on the public lands they call home. And that starts with oversight.

From the reporting done by our observers in the field, to sharing these findings with Congress, to enacting life changing legislation for our wild herds, and taking the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to court — we’re leading the charge for oversight and reform of the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program.

If you’re with us in our fight to preserve the freedom of America’s wild horses and burros, will you donate to fuel this critical work, today?

DONATE

The movement to protect these cherished animals has not happened overnight. Our team has taken a calculated approach to fight for the protection of our wild herds in the field, in the courts, and on the Hill. We will not stop until wild horses and burros have true freedom on the public lands they call home.

Between video footage taken at roundups and documentation from our observation team, we are creating progress and enacting historic change. Right now, legislation has been introduced in Congress that would effectively ban the use of helicopter roundups as a population management tactic by the BLM.

Every court battle won and every victory in Congress brings us one step closer to preserving the freedom of these innocent animals.

If you’re with us in our fight in the field, in court, and on the Hill to protect America’s wild horses and burros, will you donate to fuel our efforts today?

DONATE

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

Learning To Be Haltered12

Chasity’s Challenges: Learning to Come to Be Haltered: 4-14-20

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4-14-20

We determined that Chasity had cataracts in both eyes, worse in the right eye than in the left. This made her hesitant to come to me at the stall door to be haltered. She wanted to come to me, but she just wasn’t sure. I insist that ALL my equines come to the stall door or gate to be haltered, so I knew I would have to train her and win her trust to get her to do it like all the others.

When she went away from the door, I simply stepped to the inside door of her stall and encougraged her to come to me from there, but she was still suspicious and ran to the far side of the pen. I just walked toward her and spoke in a calming fashion telling her to “Whoa.”

She began to get nervous and started to weave away from my approach, but before she could suck me into the back and forth along the fence, I stepped to the side, waved her into the stall and shut the door behind her.

She knew she was confined and went to the corner of the stall. I knew she could not see me very well with her right eye, so I opted to walk along the wall to her left side and approached her from the left side. Before attempting to put on her halter, I told her what a good girl she was and offered a handful of oats. I allowed her to finish chewing them before I put on the halter.

I was careful about putting on the halter slowly so I would not startle her and then gave her a reward of more oats for standing still. She was grateful and again, I waited until she was finished chewing before asking anything more from her.

Then I asked her to square up with equal weight over all four feet. This would become the protocol EVERY time she stops. I want to change her posture and begin to increase her core strength in good postural balance. The repetition of this movement will change her habitual way of standing.

I rewarded her again and then took off the halter while standing by the open door and watched her chew.

I rewarded her for NOT forging through the door, waited for her to finish chewing and then put the halter back on.

We then turned around and walked to the back of the stall to open the door I had closed, did another turn and exited the stall. She will soon tire of me going into the pen and chasing her into the stall. One thing that is also VERY important in halter training is the type of halter that you use. Although they do provide leverage, rope halters have pressure points everywhere there is a knot and the biggest knot is right underneath their ear. Try putting your index finger underneath your ear and ask yourself how long you could stand it just being there? Now put the palm of your hand under your ear. How does that feel? Nylon webbed halters lay flat against their face and do not cause distractions like rope halters will. The equine can focus their attention 100% on YOU and not be distracted by subtle pressure points!

I would much rather encourage my animals to comply happily and willingly than try to use any kind of forcible leverage with them. I have found it to be unnecessary. Building a willing bond between you prevents them from becoming herdbound and being sour about leaving their friends. It enhances the relationship between you so they really WANT to go with you. This particular routine gave Chasity an idea of what to expect and resulted in her coming to the stall door willingly when I call her after only two times of having to proceed this way…completely resistance free. She is a very intelligent girl and learns quickly despite the disadvantage of cataracts. I have other equines with eyesight issues that have been successfully trained the same way. The key is patience, understanding and a careful, respectful and sensible approach.

LTR Training Tip 58 Screenshot

LTR Training Tip #58: Getting in Sync on the Drive Lines

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Good posture, consistent rhythm and regularity of footfall patterns are key to achieving calmness in your equine. After getting into sync with your equine on the lead rope by matching steps with his front legs, getting into sync with his back legs will help him to stay calm while ground driving him from behind at the walk.

Download Detailed Description

See more Training Tips

Helicopter cameras — 1 way we can hold the BLM accountable

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Every year, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) uses helicopters to brutally round up thousands of wild horses and burros. The majority of these roundups occur in remote areas of the West — out of the public’s eye. Our team of observers work to document these operations to hold the BLM accountable and to educate the public as to what’s happening to our federally protected wild horses and burros.

The BLM and its contractors that execute these helicopter stampedes have placed a number of restrictions on public observation, creating a significant lack of transparency at the site of these traumatic roundups.

If these federal roundups continue, there is one way we can ensure accountability — cameras. If cameras are installed on every helicopter used to capture wild horses and burros we can create public transparency and independent oversight for any operations that occur out of the public’s view. Will you join us today by calling for the installation of cameras for all helicopter roundup operations?

TAKE ACTION

We’ve seen time and time again that the public observation areas for each roundup are simply not enough to hold the BLM fully accountable. At the Wyoming Checkerboard roundup this past year, our team was placed over a mile away from the trap site and in a spot where terrain blocked most of our view.

Oversight and documentation drive accountability. Accountability that is badly needed to preserve the freedom — and more importantly, the lives — of America’s wild horses and burros. If you’re with us, will you call on the BLM today to require contractors to install cameras on their helicopters used in roundup operations?

TAKE ACTION

Thanks,

AWHC Observation Team

The BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program needs oversight

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) may have grounded its helicopters for the 2022 wild horse foaling season, but thousands of burros are still stuck in the crosshairs starting next month.

We send humane observers to bear witness to these devastating roundups, and , they are reporting some recurring and upsetting themes; a significant lack of transparency from the BLM and its contractors during the operations and a concerning number of injuries and deaths.  

Today is the first email in a series where we’ll be sharing the costs and consequences of the BLM’s roundup program. Over the next few days, you’ll be hearing from us with observations from the field that highlight just why the BLM’s program urgently needs reform.

We’re using the documentation our team has accumulated to hold the BLM accountable. Will join us by calling for a Congressional oversight hearing on the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program?

TAKE ACTION

The massive roundup that ended earlier this year in Wyoming’s Checkerboard region resulted in the removal of an astounding 4,161 wild horses, making this the largest wild horse roundup in history. The toll was steep: 37 of these cherished animals lost their lives as a result of the helicopter roundup itself, while dozens more died in the holding pens in the month after the operation ended.

Our investigations, based on information obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, have revealed that the BLM is dramatically under-reporting the mortality rate of helicopter roundups by excluding the deaths that occur in the holding pens days and weeks after the roundups end.

This is unacceptable. Wild horses are being chased to pure exhaustion in a run for their freedom and their lives. Far too many die after sustaining traumatic injuries such as broken limbs and necks.

Enough is enough. Congress must be presented with the reality of these roundups that we, the taxpayers, are paying for. Will you join us in calling on Congress to hold an oversight hearing on the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program? Reform of this disastrous program is needed now more than ever.

TAKE ACTION

Thanks for fighting alongside us,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

Chilly Pepper – NORMAN UPDATE – HE IS DYING – heading to WSU to give him his only chance. $2500 down needed.

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Norman has what Doc thinks is a rare blood disorder where he is allergic to whatever colostrum he received from his Mama before she died.

I am loading him up to go to WSU, but I need to raise $2500 to get him in. Most likely he will need a complete blood transfusion. He had a plasma transfusion, but that is completely different.

If he does not get this chance he will die for sure.

I know it is a lot of money, but he has fought so hard and is such a happy little mess.

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE help me try and save him.

You an donate directly to WSU at 509-335-0711 to Chilly Pepper for Norman.

Thank you for helping him.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
12965 Green Saddle Drive, #233
Golconda, NV 89414

or

Palomino,
C/O Mama Mel
1630 Pumphouse Rd.
Toppenish, WA 98948

checks to PO Box 233,

Golconda NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Did You Hear?

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Guess what??? It’s time to meet

AAE’s cutest and littlest new herd member!

​In June 2021, we took in two reported pregnant mares as part of a nearby animal services case involving multiple animals. Shortly after arrival, our vet came for exams and ultrasounds. One showed a foal, the other did not. Dr. Stolba estimated mom-to-be was three to four months along, which meant baby was due in February or March. Fast-forward to February 22, 2022 (2/22/22), and mama gave birth to a beautiful filly! This baby girl is mostly legs and one of the most adorable foals we have ever seen (but aren’t they all?).

Baby girl is healthy and so is mom. Mom has great maternal instincts, and she is the protector extraordinaire. They have bonded well, and they are doing great. There’s only one thing missing…a name! That’s where we need your help!

Would you like to chose her name? We are auctioning naming rights to pick her name on our Facebook page THIS SUNDAY.

How It Works:

Bidding begins Wednesday, March 16 at 9am PT and closes Sunday, March 20 at 5pm PT.

Once the auction opens, the auction post will be pinned to the top of AAE’s Facebook page.

Comment the dollar amount you would like to bid. (Bidding starts at $10). Please do NOT include your name in the comments.

If you out bid someone, please tag them to let them know in the comment with your bid.

Highest bid at closing on March 20, 2022 at 5p wins! This person will be able to select Filly’s name. ***The name should follow AAE’s naming convention, which is a country artist inspired name, and it cannot be a name already used for a current or former AAE horse. AAE has final approval of the name.

We will contact the winner after the auction to finalize the name choice.

Important information on the recent outbreak of

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) in California

If you haven’t heard, there has been an outbreak of Equine Herpes Virus-1 (EHV-1) and Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM, which is EHV-1 infection with neurological signs) in California.

If you have horses, are around horses, and/or volunteer at AAE, it’s important to understand how EHV can be transmitted and how to prevent the disease from spreading. See the following information shared from Loomis Basin Equine Medical Centers FB page:

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) has been detected in multiple horses in several counties in California since February.

Equine herpesvirus causes respiratory disease, abortion, neonatal death, and the neurological disease EHM. It spreads in aerosolized secretions, by direct contact, and by contact with surfaces containing infected secretions. Shedding of the virus generally occurs for 7-10 days.

Horse owners must immediately isolate any horses exhibiting neurologic signs and consult their veterinarian; EHM has mandatory State reporting requirements. Owners must practice good biosecurity when they move horses in emergency situations or for veterinary care; avoid other horses and don’t share tack/equipment that hasn’t been properly cleaned and disinfected, including farrier and veterinary equipment.

Additional information on EHM, including updates on current EHV-1 cases and a map of affected areas, please visit the CA Animal Health Branch webpage. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your vet.

Source: Loomis Basin Equine Medical Cente

Chilly Pepper – Newborn Norman needs your help!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Received a 911 call today for a baby found alone with his dead Mama.

He needs plasma n fluids and we are currently at Goldendale Veterinary Hospital for some emergency care.

This is the 3rd baby so far and all have needed vet care, in addition to the normal bloodwork required for every baby.

Norman said he would really appreciate your love n support.

Kimmy n Ms. Kisses are doing better. Ms. Kisses is still.on antibiotics and clay treatment for her bite wounds. Of course this caused raging diarrhea, so she is not a “Mama fan” right now lol. She is getting BioSponge way more often than she thinks she should.

PLEASE HELP NORMAN!! Obviously, he will NOT be available for adoption at this time. We will post when he is unavailable.

Goldendale Vet – 509- 773-0369 if you want to donate directly to the vet. Heading there now.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
12965 Green Saddle Drive, #233
Golconda, NV 89414

or

Palomino,
C/O Mama Mel
1630 Pumphouse Rd.
Toppenish, WA 98948

checks to PO Box 233,

Golconda NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

We’re changing the wild horse narrative

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Wild horses and burros get a bad rap in the media. These American icons are all too often labeled “invasive” and scapegoated as the cause of land degradation in the West.

We both know that’s not true. So we’re working to change the narrative from this:

To THIS:

To THIS:

FUEL OUR WORK

The plight faced by our cherished wild horses and burros is fueled by misinformation. These innocent animals are blamed for environmental damage across the West when they only inhabit a tiny fraction of our public lands. In fact, research implicates commercial livestock grazing, not wild horses, as the primary cause of land degradation.

The livestock industry has lobbied Congress for decades, blaming wild horses and burros with flawed statistics to try and get its way — well, we won’t have it. 

As our organization and supporter base rapidly grows, so does our influence on Capitol Hill. We’ve built relationships with wild horse champions at the local, state, and federal levels and will continue to be the legislative voice of our cherished wild herds.

We’re demonstrating through our PZP program on the Virginia Range in Nevada that humane, in-the-wild management works. And we’re meticulously tracking and reporting on the successes of this program to show Congress and the media that there is a better way to manage wild horses and burros than costly and deadly helicopter roundups.

We’re leading the charge in the field, in courts, and on the Hill to preserve the freedom of America’s wild horses and burros. So today we’re asking, will you make a donation to fuel this powerfully important work?

DONATE

Thanks for your support,

The AWHC Team

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