Monthly Archive for: ‘September, 2021’

This sweet girl needs you!

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he following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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There’s no rest for the weary. AAE is having a challenging September with three hospitalizations. The bright light is that two special horses are are getting a second chance at life because of you.

 

This sweet mare is in the hospital now, and she has a long road ahead.

She was dropped off at the vet for euthanasia because she’s been sick with a respiratory issue (non-contagious). Now she has a new life.

What matters is that we got the call, and we offered her a true second chance. Thankfully, owner agreed she could be saved if someone would take her.

We’ll have more photos to share soon. Please say some prayers for this young lady!

 

 

 

It happened not only once, but twice! This young man, now known as Trace, was retired from service from a local mounted police unit. He developed some swelling in his left eye due to a mass. After a series of diagnostics, there was not a definitive answer, but cancer was at the top of the list, and eye removal was likely part of his future. He was retired from service, but this guy was still so full of life.

We took a chance on this guy hoping, if nothing else, we’d be able to offer his a retirement filled with TLC while nature took its course.

Once at AAE, we discussed two more diagnostic options for a biopsy to get a more definitive diagnosis, either by scoping his sinus or by going into his frontal sinus.

So, off the to the vet he went so we could get a peak inside. The scope was inconclusive. Much to everyone’s surprise, once in the sinus, it appeared to be a cyst causing the swelling.

Tissue samples were collected and sent of to the lab, and Trace came back to the barn for a while. Several days later, we got some good news and some not so good news. Good news was the tissue was not cancer. Not so good news was that Trace needed another surgery to remove the cyst and make sure there was nothing more going on inside there.

Thankfully, the docs removed the cyst, cleaned things up, and put this handsome guy back together again. After post-op checks, he was released with great news. Though there is a slight chance the cyst could return, he has an excellent prognosis.

He is home and doing incredibly well. He’s demanding at feed time, and he’s not skipped a beat.

We are incredibly grateful that because of all of you, Trace also has a second chance at a new life.

As many of you know, our sweet Daisy crossed the Rainbow Bridge last week after an extended hospitalization for a prolonged colic. Trace’s first surgery was scheduled the same day Daisy went into the hospital. Needless to say, our vet budget took a big hit this month. If you’re able to donate toward their hospitalization costs, know your help has truly offered second chances for both of these lucky souls!

Donate

Just a reminder, the new date for Boots & Bling is

Saturday, October 16, 2021, at 4pm

at the El Dorado County Fairgrounds.

Our thoughts and prayers to all El Dorado County residents,

the firefighters, their families, and everyone impacted by the Caldor Fire.

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MULE CROSSING: On the Trail with Mules

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By Meredith Hodges

With the hectic schedule of spring and summer slowly tapering into fall, thoughts of cool, refreshing mountain streams, the sight of a massive bull elk, or the quiet majesty of the rugged mountain peaks on a relaxing trail ride, mountain hunt or pack trip begin to ease their way into our minds. What better time to share with your mule or donkey? What better place for him to show you what he was born to do? A mountain trail ride or pack trip are both perfect ways for you to get to really know your Longears and strengthen the bond between you.

Mules are remarkably strong and durable animals, making them excellent mountain partners. The cupped shape of their hooves allows them to track the rough mountain terrain with much more surefootedness than their counterpart, the horse. A mule’s superior intelligence and strong sense of survival help him to carefully negotiate the placement of his feet, insuring the safest ride possible. This is both important and comforting to know when heading for the mountains. The mule’s strength and endurance are sometimes unbelievable, but always dependable. On a hunting trip, he will take you through rough mountain terrain for days then pack out the “elk of your dreams” with the greatest of ease.

Around the campfire, he is wonderful company on those lonesome mountain nights. His blatant curiosity can make for some fun—and funny— situations, and his loving ways will win your heart. But first and foremost, he is a reliable companion when the going gets tough.

A few years ago, some close muleskinner friends of mine decided to take a hunting trip into the Rocky Mountains. Packing in, the weather was beautiful with warm temperatures, calm breezes, and not a cloud in the sky. After setting up camp and tending to their horses and mules, the hunters set off tracking elk. Hunting was good, but after a few days, the evening brought with it an unpredictable snowstorm of incredible intensity. The hunters crawled from their tents the next morning to discover their camp buried in more than four feet of   snow!

With no chance of the storm lifting, the hunters packed up what they could on their horses and mules and quickly got under way. Since time was of the essence, tents and much of their gear had to be left behind. As they left the campsite, the snow deepened and the terrain underneath was steep, rocky and treacherous. They had gone only a short distance when the snow became so deep and the terrain so hazardous that the horses refused to go one step farther. Anxiety was high when the horses could not blaze a trail out. The hunters were worried they wouldn’t make it off the mountain alive.

In the face of this great danger, my friend asked his trusted mule, Goliath, to break trail for the others. With slow, careful, deliberate steps, this well-trained, loyal mule led them all down the mountain to safety. Once there, they freed their trucks and trailers, which were buried in snow, loaded them up, and made their way back to the lowlands to safety. The storms on the mountain worsened and it was spring before the hunters could return for the rest of their gear, but they were eternally grateful to Goliath the mule for leading them safely down the mountain!

There are many stories like this one, where mules and donkeys have emerged as heroes in precarious situations. However, if you prefer not to take risks like my hunter friends, there are other less daunting activities you can enjoy with your donkey or mule.

Why not take your longeared companion along to the mountains for a hike or a picnic? He would thoroughly love just being with you in those beautiful surroundings. While you walk the trails, enjoying the marvels of nature, your donkey or mule can carry the lunch essentials. While you enjoy the wildflowers or try your hand at fishing a mountain stream, you can be confident that your Longears will enjoy the peaceful solitude and be able to stay out of serious trouble at the same time.

If you question taking excursions such as these with your longears because of a lack of training, there are fellow Longears lovers who can help you. All over the United States, excellent mule trainers are available to help beginners. A Longears lover once told me that his love for burros and mules began years ago when he found Dusty, a three-month-old wild burro caught in a blizzard. He took her home and cared for her, and, a year later, he entered her in the National Western Fall Classic Donkey and Mule Show. He and Dusty were awarded the title of Reserve Champion Donkey of the Show! Ever since, he has sought to help others enjoy Longears and horses in any way he can. In addition to breaking and training wild mustangs at his Medicine Bow Stables, he has included free clinics for burro owners to teach them how to handle and care for their animals.

Getting proper training for your donkey or mule can only enhance your relationship with them and in turn, they will enrich your life. This fall, why not take the time to really get to know these remarkable animals by letting them share in the fun, be it hiking, hunting, packing, or picnicking. The life you enhance may be your own!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2010, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.

We haven’t heard from you in a while!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from you.

The fight to keep wild horses and burros free on our public lands is more urgent than ever.

  • Congress is considering an appropriations bill that could pave the way for the Bureau of Land Management’s forced roundup of 90,000 wild horses and burros from public lands over the next five years. This is the first installment of the BLM’s multi-billion dollar proposal to cull wild horse populations back to extinction levels, a plan that will push the program off the fiscal cliff and could result in the mass slaughter of America’s national icons.
  • The BLM’s cruel and inhumane summer assault on wild horses is already underway across the West as of July 1. Helicopter roundups in the sweltering desert heat involve tiny, vulnerable foals who risk being literally run to death after miles-long helicopter chases. The BLM plans to round up and remove more than 5,000 federally-protected wild horses and burros from public lands by September.

If there was ever a time that wild horses and burros needed your support, now is that time.

Learn more about AWHC’s efforts to protect our wild horses and burros, and how you can get involved.

We hope to hear from you soon, and that you are ready to get back in the fight to defend these national treasures,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director

TT 46 When Stage Two

LTR Training Tip #46: When Stage Two Leading Lessons Aren’t Working

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If leading lessons aren’t working, try asking yourself these questions to figure out what’s going wrong.

 

Download Detailed Description

See more Training Tips

Please read: FY 2021 Roundup Season in Review

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

In just a few short days, the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Fiscal Year (FY) 2021 roundup season will come to a close and the FY 2022 season will begin. Since last September, 17,917 wild horses and burros have been brutally chased by helicopters and most have been shipped to overburdened holding facilities.

The BLM’s aggressive roundup schedule will result in the highest number of wild horses and burros ever maintained in the BLM’s holding facilities.

We mourn for all of the wild horses and burros who have lost their freedom and their families. The silver lining to this upsetting news, however, is that public opposition to this cruel and costly program has never been greater.

Just this month, Colorado Governor Jared Polis spoke up passionately against a BLM roundup in his state, the National Sierra Club called on Interior Secretary Haaland to remove livestock from wild horse habitats, and the Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) sent a letter to Secretary Haaland demanding that the BLM stop scapegoating wild horses for environmental damage caused by private livestock grazing.

Together, we are stronger than ever — and we promise to continue our work to protect the rights and freedom of America’s wild horses and burros.

If you’re with us in the continued fight for our cherished wild horses and burros, will you make a donation to fuel the American Wild Horse Campaign’s work today?

DONATE

Your contributions make our advocacy for humane and scientific management practices possible. Your funding also allows AWHC to continue to hold the BLM accountable for the animal welfare abuses committed during helicopter roundups.

Earlier this month, we asked for your help to fight back against an especially brutal roundup in the Sand Wash Basin in Colorado, where tiny foals were being stampeded with helicopters and several were left alone to fend for themselves in the wild after their mothers were captured. And you stepped up.

In just 24 hours, supporters like you generated over 10,000 emails and calls demanding a halt to the roundup. The public pressure and the Governor’s intervention worked. The roundup was halted early and 150 wild horses who were targeted for removal remained free!

Change will happen, if we continue to work together. 

If you’re with us in the fight to protect these cherished animals and preserve their freedom on our public lands, will you make a donation to fuel our work today?

DONATE

Thank you for your support,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

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MULE CROSSING: Training for Health, Happiness and Safety

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By Meredith Hodges

Whether you just want to use your equine for pleasure riding or for show, the way your equine should be managed is still the same. He still needs to be fed, managed and trained correctly for optimum health and performance in order to be a safe, happy and healthy companion. What you do with him each and every day lays the foundation for future challenges. When he is schooled in a logical and sequential way that allows muscles to be slowly and symmetrically strengthened in good equine posture, he will feel better overall than the equine that is not schooled this way. He will not only be able to do tasks safely and more easily, but will actually be happy and have fun engaging with you. The incidence of resistant behaviors becomes practically non-existent. Taking shortcuts with training will never produce the trust and confidence of an equine that is logically and sequentially schooled.

Even pleasure riding produces physical challenges.

Balance in good posture separates the winners from the rest at shows and other public events.

Encouraging good manners and offering the food reward of oats will begin positive negotiation with your equine right from the beginning. He will eagerly learn to look forward to his time with you.

The food reward assures that good behaviors will be repeated and your consistency in routine will transform the equine into one that remains calm, that  will ultimately stand quietly upon request.

Being promptly rewarded for confidence and bravery during the execution of fearful tasks such as negotiating obstacles will begin to lay a foundation of trust between you.

When your equine trusts your judgment, trail loading and similar tasks are no problem at all. He will follow you anywhere, anytime…even in stormy weather!

Teaching your equine to execute gates the same way every time results in learned behavior

 …the halter and lead rope become incidental.

He will always go through and turn back to you for his reward and can then be easily haltered outside of the pen or easily caught anywhere, anytime.

When you need to lead teams, they will all learn to negotiate the gate the same way.

Even multiple animals will still exit the gate, turn to you and wait for their halters and rewards.

Practicing showmanship techniques as a matter of course and not just reserving it for a show, gives leading a purpose that your equine can easily understand. It begins to develop strength in good equine posture that makes him comfortable in his body.

Standing still while mounting is never a problem when your equine is properly prepared and knows what to expect. The anxiety that causes movement is no longer present.

Carefully planned and controlled exercises in the round pen with the “Elbow Pull” gives your equine the freedom to move in good posture with a passive support system. It will help him to hold that posture for more than a few strides at a time. It gives muscles the time to be properly conditioned in good posture before the rider is ever introduced.

When the rider is finally introduced, he is strong enough in his own ideal posture to be able  to sustain his balance while dealing with any shifts of balance from an inexperienced rider or variations of terrain.

When your equine has had ample leading training for good equine posture, it is easy to make the transition to ground driving in good posture, whether driving single or with teams…

…large or small, your equines will be in sync with you, and with each other. They can easily learn to pull evenly, stop squarely and stand quietly.

Learning to negotiate obstacles correctly and in good equine posture aids in symmetrical muscle development and the ability to stand balanced and comfortable in a variety of postures…

…this makes it much easier for handling by the veterinarian and farrier, and during practical applications such as taking x-rays from blocks.

Learning to stand off the end of a bridge during leading training exposes how unbalanced most equines really are until they learn how to negotiate these kinds of strengthening and balancing exercises. No mammal is automatically born in good posture. It must be taught.

When it IS taught, standing on the x-ray blocks behind is easy for your equine and will not cause anxiety and the necessity to move. If he gets stuck in a strange position he can wait and sustain the position much longer if he has core strength and is balanced in his body.

The equine that has had adequate schooling in good equine posture during leading training to promote good balance in the Round Pen with lunging and ground driving will be much stronger and better balanced overall.

This makes for a much smoother ride and a happier animal!

Practicing jumps first on the lead rope and then in the drive lines helps to build strong muscles in good posture that is essential for body control over jumps with a rider on board later. He learns to not only balance his body, but to jump only as high as needed to clear the fence.

This conservation of energy allows him to tuck his knees neatly underneath his body and clear jumps with alacrity and grace. It allows the rider a smooth ride over fences with plenty of stamina on the cross country courses. This logical and sensible approach to training will always keep you and your equine safe and happy together!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2014, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SYALER eNewsletter

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The following is from Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue:

 

Happy Autumn

Hello again! Remember me? Apologies for the lack of newsletters. To be honest, I have just not felt up to writing. The current state of affairs in the world has knocked me off my perch a bit. I do miss writing about what is going on as a LOT has been going on at Broomtail Farm, home of Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue.

It’s been quite stressful dealing with the increase in the price of just about everything we need. Supplies are more expensive; feed is more expensive; our hay price went up by 3.50 a bale! Hopefully we will be able to find enough to get us through the winter. Our Shelter Logic buildings all bit the dust this year so new hay storage sheds were required. We figured even though the initial investment was much greater, a shed will last a heck of a lot longer.

Hannah has been working like crazy and the results are apparent. We have taken in quite a few animals in need of medical care and training. All the animals that came in as “unhandleable” are now enjoying physical attention. All have had their VERY PRICY medical issues taken care of. Thank you, Hannah!

We have been getting a lot of calls from folks needing to surrender their animals. So many that we currently have a waiting list as we just don’t have the room or resources to take in more at this time.

We have just made the sad decision not to have our Open House again this year due to the pandemic. The Delta variant has been prevalent in our area, and we do not want to put anyone at risk. We are not doing Equine Affaire this year also due to the pandemic. We miss seeing our friends and supporters in person, but it’s not worth the risk of having anyone become ill.

For a wee bit of good news, we will be getting some new merchandise in for your holiday shopping. We have recently got in a few adoption applications, so there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

I thank each and every one of you for your kind words and acts of support. We could not do what we do without you.

Stay well.

Ann

Merlot and Grayson say have a happy fall!

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MULE CROSSING: Mule Fever, Part 2

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By Meredith Hodges

With the hectic work schedule of spring and summer slowly tapering into fall, thoughts of relaxing mountain hunting and pack trips begin to ease their way into your mind: thoughts of cool, refreshing mountain streams, the sight of a massive bull elk, or the quiet majesty of the rugged mountain peaks. What better time to share with your mule or donkey? What better place for him to show you just what he is capable of doing? A relaxing mountain trail ride or pack trip is the perfect place for you to get to know your longears and strengthen the bond between you.

Mules are excellent mountain partners. They are a strong and durable animal. Due to the cupped shape of their hooves, they can cover the rough mountain terrain with much more surefootedness than their cousin, the horse. Mules’ superior intelligence and strong sense of survival helps him to negotiate careful placements of his feet, ensuring the safest possible ride. This is both important and comforting when looking for a relaxing ride in the mountains. The mule’s strength and endurance is sometimes unbelievable, and always incredible. He will take you through the rough mountain terrain for days, and then pack out that “elk of your dreams” with the greatest of ease. Around the campfire, he is a wonderful companion on lonesome mountain nights. His blatant curiosity can make for the most humorous of situations and his loving way can win your heart. But more than that, he can be relied upon when the going gets tough.

In the fall of 1984, Loveland, Colorado muleskinner Buddie Stockwell and farrier, Jerry Banks, along with a few friends, decided to make a hunting trip into the Rocky Mountains. Packing in, the weather was beautiful with warm temperatures, calm breeze and nary a hint of what was to come. After setting up camp and tending to their horses and mules, the hunters went about the business of tracking elk. Hunting was good, but after a few days, one evening brought with it an unpredictable storm of incredible severity. The hunters awoke the following morning to find their camp buried in more than four feet of snow, with no chance of the storm lifting.

Quickly, the hunters packed up what they could on the horses and mules. Tents and a lot of gear had to be left behind since time was of the essence. As they left the campsite, snow deepened and the terrain underneath was steep, rocky and treacherous. They had only gone a short distance when the snow became so deep, and the terrain so hazardous that the horses refused to go one step father. The horses would not blaze the trail out! Anxiety was high and the hunters were fearful of never making if off the mountain.

In the face of great danger, Buddie asked his trusted mule, Goliath to break trail for the others, and with slow, careful, deliberate steps, Goliathled them all safely down the mountain to their trucks and trailers, which were also buried in snow. In bitter cold, they freed the vehicles, loaded them up and made their way back to the lowlands to safety. The storms on the mountain worsened, and it was spring before Jerry and Buddie could return for the rest of their gear. But both men and their friends were grateful to Goliath for leading them down the mountain to safety.

There have been many stories such as this, where mules and donkeys have emerged the heroes in precarious situations. If you are the type who likes to take risks, it is comforting to know that your odds are better when paired with a mule. However, if you are one of those who prefer not to take such risks, there are other activities you can enjoy with your donkey or mule.

Why not take your longeared companion to the mountains for an enjoyable hike and picnic? He would thoroughly love just being able to serve you in such a beautiful surrounding. While you walk the trails enjoying the marvels of nature, your donkey or mule can carry the essentials for an elegant lunch. You can enjoy the lovely wildflowers or try your hand at fishing in the plentiful mountain streams. Your Longears would enjoy the peaceful solitude of such an excursion, and you can be confident of his ability to stay out of serious trouble.

If you question taking excursions such as these with your Longears because of a lack of training, there are Longears-lovers nearly everywhere now who can help you. All over the world, mules and donkeys are being revived in their use. With this revival comes a vast number of mule enthusiasts with varying abilities, but they all have one thing in common. They are all willing to lend a helping hand when they can. In this country, “Mule Fever” has spread like wildfire and we are now fortunate enough to have many competent mule trainers available to beginners in all sections of this country. Rocky Mountain man Curtis Imrie made his mark as a Champion pack burro racer for more than a decade and showed the very same burros at the National Western Stock Show during the winter.

Mule and donkey trainer from Bailey, Colorado, Dick Nichols’ love for burros and mules began when he found Dusty, a three-month-old wild burro caught in a blizzard. He took her home, cared for her and later entered her in the National Western Fall Classic Donkey and Mule Show, where both he and Dusty were awarded the title of Reserve Champion Donkey of the Show. Ever since, Dick has sought to help others enjoy Longears and horses in any way he can. In addition to breaking and training wild horses at his Medicine Bow Stables, Dick included in his program free clinics for burro owners to teach them how to handle and care for them. The program was simple enough that he could generally help owners get their burros ridden and driven by the end of the first day! Getting proper training for your donkey or mule can only enhance your relationship with them and in turn, they will enrich your life. So, consider taking the time to become acquainted with these remarkable animals by allowing them to share in your fall activities whether it be hiking, hunting, packing or picnicking. The life you enhance may be your own!

For more information about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive correspondence training program, Training Mules and Donkeys, please visit www.LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Also, find Meredith Hodges and Lucky Three Ranch on Facebook and Twitter. And don’t forget to check out her children’s website at www.JasperTheMule.com.

© 1985, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

AugieSpuds0218

Longears Music Videos: Little Big Shots: LTR Miniatures

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See more Longears Music Videos

CHILLY PEPPER – Quick update on horses shipping to slaughter

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Quick Update on the Catcher’s horses.

Just got home from meeting with the Catcher. This is killing me. There is simply no way to save everyone. I am already physically ill from having to say yes or no.

The only good news is that I have 5 days to raise the funds to save as many as we can.

The goal is to raise at least $1500 for each horse. I have to be able to provide proper care and feed for them until they are adopted.

For a mare and foal pair, $500 – bail and vetting for the pair

$350 – hay for the month

$200 – Foal Lac Pellets (Mare is emaciated)

$125 – Mama and baby grain

So after bail, vetting and basic feed for the 1st month, it costs $1175, and that does not include any medicine, special care, transport etc. The likelihood of having them for over several months is high, especially because this particular pair are in horrible shape and the baby has a very badly injured face.

So $1500 won’t even cover the cost for two months for this particular pair if baby needs stitches.

I am hoping to pull at least 10 if not more.

Thankfully I am supposed to have until the 25th to raise enough funds. Originally the deadline was today, but if we can pull at least 10, we have until the 25th.

Please help me keep saying YES, to saving these lives.

Please check out the New Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
C/O Melody LeBeau
1630 Pumphouse Rd
Toppenish, WA 98948

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

PS – The paypal link is once again working properly.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

CHILLY PEPPER – Another EMERGENCY! Huge Dilemma – CATCHER Called – CLOCK IS TICKING! Who do we save – Who ships?

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

I Need Your Help Asap!

We currently have 6 new babies, along with the other 12 horses and a draft named Tiny at camp, not to mention the horses in NV. (Tiny had to go to the emergency vet this morning!) Mario is still with us, but having issues getting up by himself.

CATCHER just CALLED and I will be heading over TODAY so I can let him know who and how many orphans and/or horses we can save.

There is nothing harder than walking up to a group of horses and choosing who lives or dies. I am literally physically sickWE are the ONLY CHANCE for any of them to stay off the slaughter truck. I have nightmares about the horses I leave behind. It isn’t fair, but if I don’t go, NONE of them will avoid being shipped.

I need funds to purchase, vet, transport, feed and care for every horse I pull.

It is a terrifying time to take on more horses as Adoptions are lower than normal due to our efforts still being maliciously shut downAdopters are still being contacted and told something is wrong with the horse, it has been adopted, it is dangerous etc. etc.

I am running on FAITH, a broken heart and pure exhaustion. Faith that God will guide me and that my amazing Chilly Pepper Family will fight as hard as I do to save as many as we can!!

Funds are extremely low and vet bills keep climbing. Doc is coming tomorrow for more coggins. The boys just got gelded. So it goes in rescue.

Blood and guts and open wounds are the easy ones. I can handle those myself. However, I cannot do x-rays, blood tests, life saving Plasma etc. without a vet.

Tiny is currently in the hospital. He is our latest rescue and he came in last night. We know he has neurological issues, as well as possible laminitis. He needs to remain in the hospital until the pain is controlled enough to take x-rays and make sure his coffin bones have not rotated beyond help.

Please help me keep saying YES, to saving these lives.

Please check out the New Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
C/O Melody LeBeau
1630 Pumphouse Rd
Toppenish, WA 98948

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

PS – The paypal link is once again working properly.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

EXCLUSIVE FOOTAGE >> Watch our mini-documentary on wild burros!!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

EXCLUSIVE FOOTAGE: Check out our mini-documentary in partnership with Dr. Erick Lundgren on ground-breaking research surrounding America’s wild burros!

WATCH HERE >>

Several months ago, we sent you an update on some scientific developments that advance our knowledge of wild horses and burros. Today, we wanted to tell you more about one of these specific discoveries:

Wild burros don’t often get as much attention as our wild horses do — even though both species have the same rich history. Often labeled as an “invasive species,” wild burros face constant threats like roundups and removals from the public lands they call home. And, Erica, fewer than 15,000 burros are estimated to remain on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands across the U.S. today. 

New research, however, has shown that wild burros provide a significant benefit to desert ecosystems. These magnificent animals browse and graze on our public lands, and incredibly, they dig wells, which provide sources of water for other wildlife in the area!

One of the main arguments for the removal of wild burros is that they are an “invasive species” — destructive to the lands they roam. This research provides critical evidence that wild burros actually help — instead of hurt — the ecosystems in which they live.

We partnered with researcher, Dr. Erick Lundgren, on a mini-documentary about this innovative work, because increasing public awareness around wild burros is one of the ways we can help to protect these cherished animals!

WATCH & DONATE >>

We’re pleased to support ongoing, cutting-edge scientific research that advances our knowledge of wild horses and burros and their importance to ecosystems while establishing conclusively that there is a more effective and humane way to manage mustangs and burros in the wild rather than by cruelly rounding them up and incarcerating them for life.

If you’re with us in the fight to protect these cherished icons, consider watching our mini-documentary and making a donation today so we can continue to follow the science and protect America’s wild horses and burros!

WATCH & DONATE >>

— AWHC Research Team

Run Free, Daisy Donk

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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Today, we are mourning the loss of our sweetest Daisy. Our girl had a challenging nine days of ups and downs, and yesterday, we helped her across the Rainbow Bridge to set her free to run across green pastures with her ol’ friends, Angus and Kasey.

Daisy came to AAE in 2016 with her big buddies, Angus and Kasey, after a family health crisis. She was six. Angus and Kasey were older draft fellas, much beloved AAE residents that have since passed. Lil Daisy was the boss of these two big guys, and she exerted her authority when it came to meal time!

Everyone was so fascinated by Daisy. From Marshallow and Patches to the rest of the farm critters….well, except maybe the sheep! It didn’t take long for the herd’s hierarchy to play out.

Daisy had the best ears in the world. Besides adorable, they were soft and fuzzy, and though she thoroughly enjoyed her spa days, her favorite was ear massages. She loved having her ears rubbed.

She was a big character, too. Her lil’ personality was precious. There was countless moments of laughter when Daisy was around.

Those of you that know Daisy know that her bestest friend was lil’ ol’ Sammy-boy. This little guy is going to miss her sooooooo very much. Please keep him in your prayers and send him lots of love. For now, he’s settling in with the mini boys, Flame, Robbie, and Dusty. It seems Flame’s wisdom understands his broken heart the best. Hang in there Sammy, you’ll have lots of love to help you along.

What I’ll miss most about this sweet girl was the softness of her muzzle and the kindness in her mouth. She gave the most loving nuzzles and nibbles, always a warm, fuzzy moment from her. If you experienced those lips, you’ll know what I mean. Kind of odd from the lil woolly mammoth.

Oh, Dais…it was so long before your time. Thank you for giving everyone such wonderful memories….sweet, cute, precious, warm, kind, funny, and all the gamut of emotions. You were such a sweet and special soul. You were loved by many, and we’ll remember you, always.

Daisy spent the last nine days hospitalized at Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center where the docs worked hard to resolve her colicky symptoms. She initially improved, then had some ups and downs, we had encouraging days, but the last couple days became very difficult, to say the least. In the end, there was nothing more we could do to ease her pain. We thank everyone for the love, support, concern, and warm words during this time. As many of you know, the costs of care for hospitalization can be challenging. If you’d like to make a donation to AAE in memory of Daisy, we would very much appreciate the opportunity to pay it forward to the next equine in need.

THANK YOU!

Donate

 

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MULE CROSSING: Mule Fever, Part 1

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By Meredith Hodges

During the last 50 years, thousands of people in this country have become afflicted with a rather unique condition. The symptoms include childlike behavior coupled with loyalty, integrity, honesty, maturity, humility and moments of overwhelming humor. Those who have this condition are among the happiest people in the world, for they are fortunate enough to experience “Mule Fever.”

“Mule Fever” begins when you gaze into the soft brown eyes of a big beautiful mule and he cocks an ear in your direction. Timidly, you request a ride, the mule complies, and the fever begins. A couple of miles down the road, a pheasant runs out of the brush and under your mule’s nose causing him to shy and unseat you. You lie in the road pained by your bruises, cussing the mule when he suddenly returns, nuzzles your face and gazes back at you with a perplexed and concerned look. Those soft brown eyes burn through to your soul, warm your heart and invite you to get up and try again. Once astride your mule again, you’d swear he is being extra-careful to avoid further mishaps. He seems sorry enough, so you forgive and forget and the bond between you strengthens and deepens. This is called “Mule Fever” and once it is contracted, one rarely recovers. Mules will remain in your heart and soul until the day you die!

The best place to witness this phenomenon is at Bishop Mule Days in Bishop, California over Memorial Day weekend each year. Thousands of mule enthusiasts gather together with their mules and donkeys to exchange stories, ideas, and even mules. The current economic troubles of the country are quickly dispelled with solutions such as: “Out of fuel, ride a mule!” and “Out of gas, ride an ass!” “And what of kicking?” asked an inquisitive bystander. A good-natured muleskinner replied, “You can’t kick while you’re working” and “You can’t work while you’re kicking!” Bishop Mule Days is a wonderful opportunity for everyone to share and enjoy a memorable weekend. Mules are the catalyst that brings people together, building new friendships and renewing old ones.

One of the most memorable cases of “Mule Fever” broke out in the city of Ogden, Utah when three dedicated mule men decided to ride their mules 600 miles to the famed Bishop Mule Days in California. Mark Romander of Meadow Brook Mules in Ogden, originated the idea to ride to Bishop two years before, but his plans were delayed. Mark had planned to make the trip alone, but a few weeks before his departure in 1983, someone let his stock out and his mule was hit by a car and killed. This tragic event quelled Mark’s plans for 1983, but made him more determined to make this ride. In 1984, his plans were again foiled by economic troubles, but his will to make the ride was strengthened. In 1985, he was more determined than ever to make his 600 mile ride with his partners, Scott Van Leeuwen, and Jerry Tindell, a Del Monte, California, horseshoer.

Mark, Scott and Jerry left Ogden on May 1, and began their long trek south through Utah to Highway 6 and across some 400 miles of desert and mountains to Bishop, California. Spring had been good that year, and grass in the desert was plentiful. They averaged about 35 miles per day, sometimes going as far as 40 or 50 miles in a day to reach water. During the nights, they camped. They reached their destination on May 19, 1985.

The three men agree that the best part of their long journey was all the wonderful people they met along the way who did everything they could to help them reach their destination. People extended their hospitality, allowing them to bed down at their ranches along the route. Others met them at strategic points with feed and water and other necessary supplies that would be difficult to carry along with them. Many new friendships were made on the trail to Bishop. Now that Bishop Mule Days is past, Mark, Scott and Jerry plan to go back and visit their newfound friends and extend their gratitude for helping to make their ride a tremendous success. For the future, they planned a 300-mile wagon ride to Bishop. We wished them the best of luck and supported them in their journey.

Ogden was fortunate to have Mark and Scott’s Meadow Brook Mule Ranch. They stood several jacks of all sizes and colors and had many different kinds of mules for sale. They were always more than willing to help anyone who wanted to know more about mules and they cooperated with other mule operations in the area to further the promotion of mules. These men are still doing all they can to educate the public about the versatility and exceptionality of mules. In addition to the 300-mile wagon ride, they sponsored an All-Mule Branding in the Tonopah and Ely, Nevada area where cowboys all rode mules to brand the cattle. Also, a hundred mules were present in the Ogden Parade on July 24th, 1986 and they hoped to have the Ogden Rodeo announced from the back of a mule. There are over 70 members of the Ogden Ass Association, all of which have contracted “Mule Fever.” There is no doubt in my mind there would be many more mule enthusiasts before long.

There are as many different kinds of mules as there are individuals to care for them. In observing the social behavior in a mule or donkey herd, you can see that the rules are simple: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you!” Each mule observes the other’s “space,” yet when closeness is needed, it’s, “You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours.” Humans are a mule’s best-loved companion, since each mule can generally have one all to himself to train and condition. We humans would like to believe that we are the trainers, but take a moment and reflect on the qualities in ourselves that mules have been responsible for like loyalty, honesty, maturity, humility, and humor. People who think that those of us with “Mule Fever” are riding inferior animals should get off their high horse and onto a mule. False pride will tear people apart where the truest pride of mules can bring people together!

For more information about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive correspondence training program, Training Mules and Donkeys, please visit www.LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Also, find Meredith Hodges and Lucky Three Ranch on Facebook and Twitter. And don’t forget to check out her children’s website at www.JasperTheMule.com.

© 1985, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SAVE THE DATE: Our Annual Stay Wild event is happening on November 4th!!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

It’s almost time for the American Wild Horse Campaign’s (AWHC) annual Stay Wild event!

Mark your calendars for November 4, because you won’t want to miss this awesome virtual event. It’s our largest —and only — big-ticket event of the year!  

The fourth annual event will be an action-packed adventure, celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act — the foundational law that protects these iconic animals on Western public lands! 

The program will take guests on a journey through time, stopping at landmark years throughout the last half-century showing how AWHC’s precedent-setting initiatives are working to solve decades-old issues to protect America’s wild horses and burros.

We’ll be in touch with more information and how to RSVP for the event in the coming weeks, so stay tuned and stay wild!

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

CHILLY PEPPER – Starved, Abandoned Orphan Foal – Heartbreak, More Babies and an Emergency Visit to the Vet Needed to Possibly Save Another Life.

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Quick update.

My heart is shattered and the tears are pouring. My Beautiful Mia Moo, my ever precious little Maniac, is now in Heaven running and loving life pain free. Her little bones never developed and you cannot fix what isn’t there (as Doc said). She had so much wrong, but I will post her story later.

I have 4 babies as of right now, and more expected. Mario is in extremely critical shape and I am praying he makes it through the night. Both Docs are on other emergencies so he will be in Goldendale at 8 a.m.

PLEASE pray for him. He is not only starved and was abandoned by his band at least 5 days ago, but he is literally being eaten alive by worms.

The other 3 are hanging in there. I need more milk for these precious souls and as always, any and all help is greatly appreciated.

We can all learn from my beloved Mia Moo. She lived life 110 miles an hour, almost as if she knew she had to experience a lifetime of fun and love in only a few months. I will be sending out a tribute to her later, but for now it is simply too raw.

For the folks who sit home and whine about how they hurt or have issues, learn from Mia. She struggled from day 1, but she never pouted or whined. She rocked her life. She lived it to the fullest and went a thousand miles an hour and when she crashed she did it with the same intensity. I will explain how she told us her motto, but for now I will simply share it.

LIVE YOUR DREAM! That is directly from Mia.

OF COURSE there is once again No Time for me to even grieve…….

All I wanted was to have some quiet time, but these new babies are here and they need my full attention. Sadly we are expecting more in the next few days.

Please help me keep saying YES, to saving these lives. It was such a blessing to be able to save the entire family. You did that with your love and support.

Please check out the New Adoption page! We have a new and improved page. I know folks enjoy sharing the horses and their progress with all of you.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
C/O Melody LeBeau
1630 Pumphouse Rd
Toppenish, WA 98948

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our NEW Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

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MULE CROSSING: The Round Pen

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By Meredith Hodges

The round pen originated as a useful training aid for Western trainers who were trying to “break” the wild mustangs that were brought in off the range. There has been spirited debate between English and Western trainers as to the real value of the round pen as a training aid, since it can produce undue stress on the fragile joints of the equine-in-training. Do not begin training your equine in the round pen, because an unbalanced and inexperienced equine in uncontrolled flight can easily injure himself. Specific types of leading exercises must be used to teach him to be in good equine posture and balance on straight lines and gradual arcs before your equine is introduced to the round pen and asked to balance at all three gaits on a circle. When your equine is properly prepared beforehand, the round pen can then become a viable and important training tool.

When choosing the site for your round pen, pick a spot that is surrounded by activity and even near the road, so it can serve a dual purpose. Not only will you begin to build your equine’s muscle during training sessions—you will get his attention under a variety of distractions. When he is exposed to noise and activity in the round pen at this early stage, it is less likely to bother him later under saddle or in harness.

Try to pick a site that is flat and not rocky. Ideally, it should have a solid base of hard-packed adobe soil. If your ground is not flat, you will need to grade a flat spot and then bring in fill-dirt, shoot it with a transit to make sure it is truly flat, and then make sure it is tamped and hardened before the three-inch depth of sand is added. The diameter of the round pen should be approximately 45 feet, so you can easily reach your equine on the rail with your lunge whip when you stand in the center.

Uneven terrain can cause uneven balance, rhythm and cadence to his gait and will cause irregularity in the footfall pattern, which can result in uneven development of your equine’s muscular-skeletal system. A smooth, hard under-surface below the sand gives your equine a smooth surface on which to place his feet without fear of injury to the sensitive parts of his hooves from rocks or other debris. Even and level ground will assure his regularity of gait and sustained balance on the circle that will build muscle symmetrically as he circles, maintaining his erect posture and bending through his rib cage with energy coming from the hindquarters. Making sure the circle is actually round will help him learn to bend his body properly through the rib cage while he is traveling on the circle.

Once the site is prepped, dig post holes at eight-foot centers on the circle and twenty-three feet from the center of the round pen to give you the 45 foot diameter. Next, pour concrete in the bottoms of the holes and measure the depth of the posts so when the posts are placed in the holes, they will all be at the same height. (There should be three feet of post in the hole and five feet above ground.) Use eight-foot posts, and when using wooden posts, try to use redwood. All types of wood are toxic to equines to some degree, but treated woods can contain arsenic and should be avoided. The best posts to use are made from steel—they will last much longer than wood. Also, steel posts can be welded with “winged plates” so the boards can be easily bolted to the posts.

Use two-by-twelve-inch wooden boards for the walls, and a smaller two-by-six-inch board around the bottom to keep the sand inside. Stack four two-inch by twelve-inch boards around on top, with three-inch spaces between the boards and a three-inch top of the post showing.

The spaces between the wider boards will allow you to get a toe into the fence so you can easily climb in and out of the round pen, and it gives you a place to tie an animal at any post. Unlike a round pen made of corral panels, the twelve-inch boards keep your toes from getting caught and twisted when riding close to the rail. It’s a much safer design and truly functional for all levels of round pen training. For both trainer and equine safety, the use of electric and wire fences and materials such as pallets and tires should be avoided completely.

Tie rings can be added onto the outside of selected posts to secure extra equines outside the round pen while they wait their turn. A round pen with solid walls should be avoided. An equine that learns to work in an open round pen is less likely to feel “trapped” and fearful of abrupt movements and noises, so he can concentrate on his work. He learns to acknowledge and accept interruptions and will keep on working.

Using bolts for the two-by-twelve inch rails makes for easy replacement as the boards become worn, and putting a metal cap around the top with angle iron will discourage chewing when you are not there to supervise. The gate posts should always be steel, as wooden posts tend to sag over time. The gate itself should be framed in steel to keep it from warping and sagging. The latch on the gate should be easily accessible from both sides, but the gate needs only to swing into the round pen for easy entrances and exits. The round pen gate pictured swings in and has a sliding barrel bolt at the top that just catches through a four-inch sleeve on the post wing.

Once the cement at the bottom of the post holes is level and completely dry and the posts are sitting in the not-yet-filled post holes, attach the top and bottom boards all the way around, check each post and rail with a level, and then attach wooden braces to the entire round pen at each post to hold the position. Next, set in the gate (either finished or not) and close it to complete the circle. Check the diameter of the circle and the distance to each post from the center to make sure it is truly 45 feet round and that all posts are upright and level. Now pour the concrete into the holes around the posts. Allow enough time for the concrete to set up before removing the braces.

When the concrete has dried completely, clean the excess concrete from around the holes. Then finish hanging all the board rails, cap them with angle iron and add whatever tie rings you want to the outside of the posts.

Let some time pass before adding the sand to your round pen. Wet weather will actually help to further compact the base, which should be hardened so it can last for many years, so if you are expecting rain or snow, all the better. Once the base is hard and dry, add three inches of clean sand to the round pen—no more and no less. If the sand is not deep enough, the hard ground can hurt your equine’s limbs and possibly cause laminitis. But if the sand is too deep, it can damage ligaments, tendons and soft tissue. If your equine ingests the sand he may colic or founder, so make sure to use your round pen for training only, never for turnout or feeding. The round pen can be used as a holding pen, but do not place food or water inside and use only for short periods of time. Good round pen construction makes all the difference. With proper construction and attention to detail, your round pen will serve a multitude of uses for years to come.

For more information about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive correspondence training program, Training Mules and Donkeys, please visit www.LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Also, find Meredith Hodges and Lucky Three Ranch on Facebook and Twitter. And don’t forget to check out her children’s website at www.JasperTheMule.com.

© 2014, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Mule Crossing: Moving Beyond Prey vs. Predator

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By Meredith Hodges

In the past, when equines ran free, they were unencumbered by human interaction and could build and condition their muscles naturally. Today, with increased population but reduced open lands, their activity is often restricted. It then becomes our responsibility to not only train them, but to prepare them physically to perform and keep them happy in their environment. This responsibility becomes even more important when we ask them to exert more energy than normal, in activities like long trail rides, endurance events, showing and equine-related work. Proper preparation for this modern-day lifestyle will help to minimize your equine’s stress, both physically and mentally.

Natural Horsemanship techniques, based on the equine’s natural behavior and status as a prey animal, promote an awareness we often overlook. They give us a wonderful way to learn how to connect with the equine mentally and communicate with him using our own verbal and body language. Many people get intimidated simply by the equine’s size. These techniques instill a sense of confidence and understanding, and without them, fewer people would take an interest in these animals and want to learn how to interact with them. A relationship with an equine can be incredibly satisfying, and equine companionship can enhance any life. This is why therapeutic riding programs for the disabled, at-risk youth, and those with other physical and mental disabilities are so successful.

Understanding the equine’s natural evolution and behaviors can help us give him what he needs to thrive in captivity. It would be nice if we could provide a habitat akin to what the wild equine used to enjoy: room to run, with an abundance of soft dirt and occasional hard ground under his feet. Unfortunately, today’s equine must deal with a multitude of unfamiliar challenges, including extreme activities, exposure to crowds of people, and more prolonged exposure to hard surfaces such as asphalt and cement, not withstanding the sometimes unrealistic demands that we put on him.

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Understanding the prey-predator responses can help to guide us in the training of our equines, but because of the change in the environment, it shouldn’t completely define our training methods. The prey animal that is uncomfortable with making direct eye contact with the human “predator,” for instance, is virtually trapped in a confined environment in which he has no control and can therefore become anxious and difficult to handle. We are taught not to make eye contact with him until he is willing to face us. We are taught to “chase” him in a round pen until he does.

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When he finally gains the confidence to approach, we are then taught to disengage his hind quarters and keep him at bay so he doesn’t breach “our space.” This can be very confusing to any intelligent being because you are telling him to “come” and then to “go away!” And, we are handicapping him by disengaging his survival ability for flight. His response over time is to give in, but under these circumstances, he will not always to learn to trust.

The equine’s natural flight reflex is strong and takes him away from conflict. However, when man intercedes without taking into consideration the physical, mental and emotional needs of the equine, it can result in resistance wherein the equine is trapped into conflict. He is then labeled disobedient and often punished for that perceived disobedience. For instance, the equine that is “trapped” on a lunge line and asked to reverse toward the handler will inadvertently be improperly set up to take the new trotting diagonal, or the new lead at canter, from a position that actually “tangles” his hind legs and causes him to fumble into the new diagonal or lead. This mistake can become painful and even detrimental to the stifles as he jumps out of the entanglement and can cause resistant behaviors which are often punished on top of the physical pain he is already experiencing.

The equine body needs to be properly prepared for his athletic endeavors, as does any athlete. We prepare our human athletes with exercises that address muscle groups throughout the whole body before they actually play the games to avoid acute injury to muscle groups that are not normally used in the game. Why would we not give our equines this same consideration?4 Teaching the reverse in the beginning should always be done in the round pen where you can ask him to turn away from you, which will set up his hind legs properly for the new direction and strengthen his body symmetrically in good equine posture. Once he has established good equine posture and balance over a long period of time doing appropriate exercises, he will then be better able to efficiently reverse towards you on the lunge line by changing direction from a position of balance rather than an awkward imbalance.

Despite the varied differences in personalities and approach, the one thing that we can all learn to do is to communicate with respect, set clear boundaries and apply good manners in order to make friends when we accept their true nature, respect it, understand it and negotiate rather than “command.” It really is that simple, although training ourselves to be that way isn’t always simple. Animals do this with each other all the time, but they are clear communicators where we humans are not always clear in our intent. That is why you will often see animals of completely different species getting along with each other, whether prey or predator.

By setting up our equine’s environment so he is able to relax, and by behaving in a polite, respectful and considerate way, the equine can learn to respond more appropriately. When we pay close attention to the healthy development of his body and provide the right kinds of exercises to strengthen his core muscles in good equine posture, we can ultimately gain the trust and respect from the equine that we need for him to deal with all situations and obstacles the same way every time—to trust and look to us for guidance before reacting. Everything that we do for him should make him feel good, and that is what real friends are for! The equine will bond to the person who trains him, so make sure you are honestly engaged with your equine.

3Be a true leader and learn to set boundaries for your equine with appropriate corrections for bad behaviors (which can be found on our website and in our products). Make these corrections quickly and then immediately return to a clear definition of what you expect and make sure that it is easily doable for your equine at each step. Every animal on the planet will correct another’s misbehaving with a very clear and undeniable gesture that will stop the abuser promptly in their tracks. Take note. This is not abusive, but rather a very clear communication of what’s right and what’s clearly wrong. In fact, in the case of the mule attacking the puma that has circulated the internet for the past few years, it was clearly a case of the mule engaging in the hunt with his human “friend.” So, who is really prey and who is predator in this particular scenario? Sometimes we just need to change our perception or understanding of things and deny all-encompassing generalizations and stereotypes.

Reward good behaviors as per the laws of Behavior Modification, or “appropriate reward system training.” The oats reward that we use ensures that the good behaviors will be repeated and will become the animal’s new natural way of being. In the practice of true Behavior Modification, all five senses should be employed: sight, hearing (voice), smell, touch and taste. These are all innate ways to communicate effectively. Any distractions should be eliminated when communicating with your equine—put away the electronic devices, clickers and loud whips, and avoid abrupt noises.

The way that you manage and train your equine can be set up in a logical, sequential and predictable routine that your equine can rely on thereby dispelling his anxiety and maximizing his trust in you. Exercises that prepare his body slowly and over a long period of time to carry a rider ensure that he will not overexert or compromise muscles that could otherwise become sore, or worse. Interaction with him that is more conversational using the five senses will elicit a more conversational response from your equine, developing a close relationship comprised of negotiation and mutual respect where both partners participate on equal ground. We spend 12 years preparing our children to become responsible adults. How could it effectively take much less for our equines to learn to live and work in their new and more crowded environment? If you have any doubts about the real success of this kind of approach, you need only visit the Lucky Three Ranch where we all make direct eye contact with each other and see the results for yourself! When our equines are spooked into flight, they run towards us, then stop and ask, “What do we do now?!”

For more information about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive correspondence training program, Training Mules and Donkeys, please visit www.LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Also, find Meredith Hodges and Lucky Three Ranch on Facebook and Twitter. And don’t forget to check out her children’s website at www.JasperTheMule.com.

© 2016, 2019, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

TT45 LeadingLateralObstacles Slideshow

LTR Training Tip #45: Leading Through Lateral Obstacles

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After your equine has mastered moving straight through obstacles, try some of the obstacles that require lateral movement.

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TELL YOUR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS: Become a Co-sponsor of the SAFE Act >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We have some breaking news to share and actions for you to take this week to protect our magnificent wild horses and burros. Remember: You are the driving force for change. Together we can keep wild horses wild! Read on and see how you can help to protect these cherished animals. >>

Safe Act Introduced in the Senate

Yesterday, a bipartisan group of U.S. Senators reintroduced the Save America’s Forgotten Equines (SAFE) Act to ban the slaughter of American horses both domestic and wild. The bill’s sponsors include Senators Bob Menendez (D-NJ), Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Susan Collins (R-Maine), and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI).

Each year, thousands of American horses, both domestic and wild, are shipped across the border to slaughter plants in Canada and Mexico. The SAFE Act would permanently prevent horse slaughter plants from opening in the U.S. and prohibit the export of American horses for slaughter for human consumption abroad.

It’s critical that we pass this bill, especially given the number of federally-protected wild horses and burros being sent into the slaughter pipeline through the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) Adoption Incentive Program. Please take action now requesting that your U.S. Senators and your U.S. Representative cosponsor the SAFE Act to end horse slaughter once and for all!

TAKE ACTION

 

Say Whoa to Giant Wild Horse Feedlot in Nevada

The BLM is charging ahead with its accelerated roundup plan, which if not reined in — will triple the number of wild horses and burros in holding facilities over the next five years! To accommodate this influx, the agency is expanding its holding capacity.

The latest proposal is for a 100-acre feedlot to warehouse 4,000 wild horses and burros in Nevada in cramped pens that will provide just 750 square feet of space per animal. The cost? Upwards of 7.3 million tax dollars annually. That’s 23 times more for one holding facility than the BLM spends program-wide on fertility control each year to humanely manage wild horse populations on the range. Insanity! Submit your comments before Sept. 17 to stand with AWHC against this costly and cruel plan. >>

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Some Good News for Your Wednesday:

Sierra Club weighs in for wild horses: The 3.8 million-member Sierra Club, citing severe bias against wild horses in resource allocation on public lands, sent a letter last week to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, calling for an “initiation of the processes necessary to end all cattle/sheep grazing on all horse occupied BLM Herd Management Area lands.”

The letter noted that “management should prioritize keeping horses on designated HMA lands within ecological parameters that maintain or promote continued progress towards a TNEB [Thriving Natural Ecological Balance].”

This is in keeping with the Sierra Club’s new national wild horse policy as well as a growing chorus of environmental organizations speaking out against the scapegoating of wild horses for environmental damage caused by livestock. Also this month, the Sierra Club Colorado Chapter and the Western Watersheds Project called for a halt to the Sand Wash Basin wild horse roundup in Colorado, calling for removal of sheep from the HMA instead. More info here. >>

More AIP horses rescued from slaughter auctions: AWHC’s investigation into the BLM’s Adoption Incentive Program continues to identify wild horses and burros sent through this cash incentive program to kill pens across the country. Along with documenting these animals and sending the evidence to the BLM and the Interior Department, we are helping to rescue victims of the AIP.

Last week, AWHC’s Rescue Fund paid the bail to save three beautiful AIP mustangs, including a two year old, and one adorable burro from a notorious kill pen in Oklahoma. Now they are safely housed at an Evanescent Mustang Rescue and Sanctuary foster, where they will decompress, gain some weight, and be available for adoption! Four more lives were saved and that is reason for celebration!

Thanks for all you continue to do to protect wild horses and burros.

— AWHC Team

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