Monthly Archive for: ‘January, 2020’

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Wrangler’s Donkey Diary: Sarcoid Treatment Again

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1-29-20

Wrangler had his first sarcoid removal on 7-20-18, but we found another one just a few weeks ago starting under his right side. It looked like he had been rubbing it as it was a bit crusty. I had a mule that did that to a sarcoid and it eventually disappeared as did the other two that were on his body. He apparently built immunity against the sarcoids. So, we opted to wait and see if this one on Wrangler would also just go away. It didn’t and it was now the size of a golf ball and would need to be removed. We treated Wrangler’s prior sarcoid with Xterra because of its location in a vascular area, but this one could safely be surgically removed.

Our veterinarian, Greg Farrand, shaved the area for the IV catheter.

We opted to do the surgery in our tack and groom area where things could be kept clean. Kim handed Greg the catheter while I kept Wrangler steady. He wasn’t exactly thrilled, but he was a good boy!

In order to make sure he landed on his left side so Greg could reach the sarcoid that was on the right side, Chad and Steve took their positions on each side and guided him to the floor.

I shaved off the long, thick shaggy hair from his barrel around the sarcoid with my #10 blade and then Greg came back over the area with his closer cut blade. We put a fleece saddle pad under his head and covered his eyes with a bath towel.

Kim prepped the area while Steve held the rope that was anchored around his hind leg to prevent any kicking if he began to wake up. Chad held the IV drip while I watched his head for unnatural breath and movement. But Wrangler just snored!

Greg carefully removed the sarcoid paying attention to getting it all. Wrangler just kept snoring!

After the sarcoid was removed, we opted not to do stitches and Greg used his Hyper Thermic machine that would trigger his immune system to fight any cells that might have not been removed. It could even cause the old sarcoid that was now dormant to drop off later if it worked to that extent. This treatment is one that replaced the old injections that used to be the follow-up treatment in sarcoid surgeries.

Kim cleaned the area afterwards and blotted the sponge onto the area to help the blood to clot.

The she removed the IV drip system from the catheter in his neck. It wasn’t long after before Wrangler began to wake up.

We kept him on his sternum and patiently waited until he was ready to try to get up. At first, he was a bit wobbly and stayed in a sitting position for a few seconds before rising to all four legs.

Once he was on all fours, we held the sponges up against his belly to further stop the blood until it could lot. Wrangler just “hung loose!”

When the blood finally clotted, we pulled the IV needle from his neck and then held sponges on that until it stopped bleeding. Wrangler was grateful to be awake again…well, sort of awake!

When he was showing some stability on his feet, we took a few circles around the room to get his circulation going again. We kept him walking intermittently around the room for about 30 minutes before putting him back in his stall and run. We removed all the bedding for a few days so it would not get stuck in the open wound that we would clean twice a day and treat once a day with Panalog until it is healed.

Wrangler didn’t have the where-with-all to be able to let out a full-fledged bray, but he did let out several grunts of appreciation to Dr. Greg as he left!

 

A major victory for the captive Fish Springs horses

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

Over the holidays, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) removed four families of wild horses from Fish Springs in Nevada’s Carson Valley, including the famed stallion Samson.

Hundreds of thousands of you reached out and got involved in the fight to keep Samson and the captured Fish Springs horses together with the hope of returning them to the wild.

While the BLM did not agree to return them to the wild, we are pleased to report that, after a coordinated and dedicated effort between a half dozen organizations working together, we were successful in keeping these cherished wild horse families intact.

During the online BLM auction for the captive Fish Springs horses, AWHC coordinated with Montgomery Creek Ranch and Freedom Reigns Equine Sanctuary to secure ten wild horses from two bands led by the stallions Rocky and Rusty.

Happily, these two families — which include three generations in Rocky’s band: 19-year-old Copper, Copper’s daughter Luna and Luna’s baby Jimmy — will now run together at Freedom Reigns’ beautiful, 3,800-acre sanctuary in California.

At the same time, Skydog Sanctuary successfully bid on Samson’s band — which includes four generations of horses: Old Momma, a 26-year old veteran mare, her daughter Apple, Apple’s daughter Dumplin’ and her colt Sam — and will provide them lifetime refuge at its beautiful 8,000-acre sanctuary in Oregon. A local family stepped up to accept the remaining horses.

The Pine Nut Wild Horse Advocates are pitching in to fund the transport of the horses to the sanctuaries as well as the gentling of the horses headed for the private ranch.

Meanwhile, the work continues to keep the remaining Fish Springs horses — and all of America’s wild horses throughout the West — wild in their habitat on our public lands.

We couldn’t have done this without you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

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A Bright Future for the Fish Springs Wild Horses

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

American Wild Horse Campaign shared an update on Bring Samson, a Wild Stallion, Home

PETITION UPDATE

A Bright Future for the Fish Springs Wild Horses

Dear Friends,

Thanks to great teamwork, the future for the four Fish Springs wild horse families who were removed from their homes on the range by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) late last year is looking bright!

It took a village — and a coordinated bidding strategy in the BLM's online auction, which ended yesterday — to secure these cherished horses. The American Wild Horse Campaign was…

Read full update

 

Tell Your Senators to Co-Sponsor the PAST Act!

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The following is from the American Horse Council:

American Horse Council Action Alert

Tell Your Senators to Push PAST Act Over the Finish Line!

Overwhelming passage of the PAST Act in the House of Representatives last year gives the bill unprecedented momentum for action in the Senate. Please help us gain a “super-majority” of cosponsors for the senate version of the PAST Act (S. 1007), championed by Sens. Mike Crapo (R-ID) and Mark Warner (D-VA). Write to your senators today and urge them to join the growing list of bi-partisan cosponsors of this important legislation.

Take Action

 

Our photos of the month [check them out!]

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Our team put together some of the most striking photos from this past month – ones that made us smile, and others that remind us why we work so hard to protect these icons every day.

Mustangs in their winter coats on the Virginia Range in Nevada, where our fertility control program is in its tenth month with over 830 wild mares inoculated with the PZP vaccine. Learn more about our program here.

AWHC joined with the Salt River Wild Horse Management Group this month to advocate for construction of a wildlife overpass for the famed Salt River wild horses in AZ. Learn more here.

Friend of AWHC and photographer, Mary Hone captured a series of photos of a wild burro youngster living her best life out on our public lands in California. Check out the series here. (Credit: Mary Hone Fine Art).

Just captured wild horses from the Eagle Herd Management Area in Nevada arrive at BLM holding pens in good body condition, despite winter conditions and BLM claims of overpopulation and starvation. Read more here.

 

Wild horses have long been misrepresented as a non-native invasive species, but respected scientists are working to change that narrative. Learn more about wild horses as a native species here.

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

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DANDELION NEEDS HELP NOW – ON THE WAY TO EMERGENCY VET

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Matt is warming up the truck and we are heading to an emergency vet visit at Comstock with Dandelion.

Last night she choked on her grain. We rushed her to our Doc and he cleared the choke. She was resting quietly but is now showing signs that she aspirated the feed into her lungs.

Her condition is critical at best. We were quoted approximately $1000 to get her scoped, radiographs etc. She has fought so hard to overcome her wounds from the Coyote attack and was thriving.

Her enthusiasm and zest for life is what caused her to eat so fast.

PLEASE HELP US HELP HER! We are already $4000 in the hole from the last vet bills. That came out of our hay funds.

She deserves this chance after fighting so hard and overcoming her injuries.

Zimmerman Veterinary
1 775-623-0981 and let them know it is for “Palomino – Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang”.

PLEASE LET’S “GIT ‘ER DONE” ONCE MORE and save these precious lives!!!

Below, Winter and Dandelion enjoying the day.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Save Your Ass Rescue Newletter

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The following is from Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue:

 

What Does It Take to Save Your Ass?

It seems as though the hot topic on donkey groups in social media is: “What do I feed my donkey?” We get asked about donkey nutrition a lot so we would like to share a little bit about what it takes to rehab donkeys and mules in need from a rescue’s perspective.

As a rule donkeys are very easy keepers because they are browsers, which means they require walking long distances for very little food. A lot of donkeys in the US are overfed, which is just as negligent if not more so than a donkey coming to us underweight. There are a large number of risks when a donkey is overweight; their liver or kidneys could fail, they could become hyperlipemic, they could founder, and/or get laminitis. It is more natural for a donkey to be thin than it is for a donkey, who is desert species, to be fat. Over the years we have had to euthanize animals due to complications from obesity. If you are reading this and thinking “oh my gosh my donkey is a chunky monkey!” don’t panic, you’re not a terrible donkey owner! We are strong believers in meeting people where they are. We can’t be upset with people who simply do not know. That’s why we are writing this and constantly trying to educate people on proper donkey welfare.

If you would like more info on getting your donkey to a healthy weight, visit https://www.thedonkeysanctuary.org.uk/what-we-do/knowledge-and-advice/for-owners/feeding-your-donkeys The Donkey Sanctuary is great resource for donkey care!

We do all the major medical and behavioral procedures for the donkeys and mules that come in so when they get adopted they have the best possible start in their new life. When you adopt a donkey or mule from us, all the routine care has been done so the new owner doesn’t have to worry about anything besides bonding with and enjoying their new long eared friend/ friends. Secondly we do this so the new owners are aware of what they are getting into ahead of time. This is very important to us as Ann and I are animal owners ourselves, and we understand that one has to be practical when it comes to adopting a large animal into your care! It can be overwhelming for first time owners so we do our best to give them and the adoptee guidance in the right direction.

We have talked a lot about our process of taking in animals so I’ll keep it short and sweet. When we take in a new donkey or mule we let them settle in first and foremost. When we feel they are stable enough and not stressed or anxious we have our veterinarian out to give them a health check up. This includes getting their routine vaccinations, dental exam/ dental work, and if any abnormalities are found we have blood work and/or tests done.

Then we call the farrier to have their hooves trimmed and get them on a schedule for every six to eight weeks.

Since a lot of animals come to us in varying conditions, we mimic the environment, and feeding care they have been getting in their previous home, to reduce stress related issues such as colic. Once they are settled in we make a feeding plan for them depending on their condition. Typically this consists of switching them over to a mineral supplement. We use California Trace mineral Supplement, and first cut hay in slow feeder hay nets. Donkeys need to be fed small amounts, frequently.

Since we are a non-profit and are always in need of donations we believe it is important to share with our amazing supporters where your donations are going, transparency is very important to us.

This is what it costs us to take in a pair of standard donkeys from the time they arrive at the rescue until the day they are adopted. This is a generalized tally as it would be totally different for a 1200 lb. 30 year old mostly toothless draft mule! We had quite a few of those those in 2019. A pair of standard donkeys if healthy and trained, stay at the rescue an average of 3-4 months before being adopted. What do you think the total cost of their stay which includes all their routine vet work, vaccinations, dentals, health check ups, health certificates, having their blood sent out for a coggins test, worming, hay, supplements, a salt block, shavings and farrier trims, would be? This does not include emergency vet calls or medications that they may be on. For two standard size donkeys who are here for four months, the cost for us to get all of their routine care done is $1,158.08! If you’ve seen our adoption fees, you know that we do not make money from adoptions. The adoption fee helps us, yes. Our primary goal is to get the donkeys and mules healthy and happy, and making love matches between long ears and humans; which makes it all worth it.

Raise a glass and toast yourselves, you amazing ass saving supporter!

We thank you all from the bottom of our hearts, and we wish you all a wonderful new year full good health and happy brays.

Sincerely,

Hannah, Ann and the SYA Team

 

Click here to see our animals for adoption!

Hobie and Walton Update

Hobie, the once wobbly little donkey is feeling fierce and full of life as of late. If you are in the pen with him, he is sure to follow you around, right at your heels. His favorite thing to do is to is sun bathe when the sun is just right in his stall overhang, and of course, breakfast.

Walton has also been full of life lately and was allowed access to the big field to play with his next door pasture mate, Vinny. Walton took advantage of all the space and trotted the entire perimeter, and then cantered back to all of his friends. He had a blast! Where Walton once had cuts, and open festering wounds, he now has new healthy skin with little baby hairs growing in. <3

Some of things we are in always in need of to continue their healing process can be found below.

-Chopped Alfalfa
-Vitamin E (Elevate)
-Purina Senior
-Hay nets with 1&1/2 inch holes
-Shavings
-Glucosamine

Thank you all for your kind thoughts for these two amazing equines!

“We should never doubt that a small group of committed people can change the world.”

-Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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TEXAS TRIUMPH NEEDS YOUR HELP!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

 

Quick update and a great big THANK YOU to everyone who helped us with Dandelion and to get this big guy home.

Dandelion is doing very well and already has an amazing couple who will be adopting her.

Meet TEXAS TRIUMPH. This beautiful 4 year old was slated for slaughter. When I got the call I had to step up.

Sadly, (as is pretty much the norm with most of the horses we rescue) he has a life threatening condition, caused most likely by lack of care.

When I went to check on him after he arrived I saw his feed and water pouring back out his nose. Much like the 2 year old TB we rescued, he could not swallow. After nearly $3000 in vet bills for him alone, (much of that cost being for the medicine for his horrific ulcers and the infection he is fighting), we are limping along, hour by hour.

His preliminary diagnosis is Esophageal Stricture, which means his Esophagus is full of scarring which is making it extremely difficult for him to eat or drink. At this point he is on liquid mash, and although he still has food and water coming back out his nose, he has been getting some down. (We had some really great poop, which means food & water are actually getting to his stomach and everything is working well inside.)

He is not in pain as far as the feed and water, but had horrible ulcers. I believe the meds are working as far as the ulcers, but his prognosis is fragile at best. He has had days where he runs and plays, and then yesterday he didn’t eat much. He is thriving as far as getting love and attention, and all he wants to do is “hang out”.

Worse case scenario is he will be loved and cared for properly until he suffers a bad case of “choke” again or gets a deadly case of pneumonia from aspirating. Best case scenario is he will live a long and healthy life, but all the vets warned me the second option is not likely. HE NEEDS YOUR PRAYERS! He is going to be part of our “Sunshine & Smiles Program” for as long as we have him.

However, he is enjoying himself, wants to “cuddle” and is playing with everything he can find, interacting with the other horses and just being a great big, loving clown.

So now we are struggling to catch up with the vet bills, keep feeding all the kids here, and start getting ready for foaling season.

We recently got the 2 remaining stallions gelded and lots of long feet trimmed. All of this costs money and we still have 4 milk babies.

So ALL help is so appreciated. Again, THANK YOU FOR SAVING SO MANY LIVES.

If you want to donate directly to our vet, here is the information.

Zimmerman Veterinary
1 775-623-0981 and let them know it is for “Palomino – Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang”.

PLEASE LET’S “GIT ‘ER DONE” ONCE MORE and save these precious lives!!!

Below, Winter and Dandelion enjoying the day.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

We need your help to save the famed Salt River wild horses

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

If you thought the famed Salt River wild horses were protected, think again. In 2017, Arizona Governor Doug Ducey signed legislation that protects the Salt River wild horses in their historic habitat in the Tonto National Forest near Phoenix.

But now this cherished herd is threatened by new plans that could result in severe habitat loss and removals of these horses from their home along the lower Salt River.

The Issue: The U.S. Forest Service is beginning construction of a metal fence along the last four miles of the Lower Salt River, including across the river itself. The fence would trap horses on either side, blocking access to the river – a critical source of hydration — and to grazing grounds on both sides of the river.

At the same time, the Arizona Department of Agriculture is considering several proposed long-term management plans for the horses. Depending on which plan is chosen, the horses could face large-scale removals and a severe reduction in their habitat.

The Stakes: Working together with our coalition partner the Salt River Wild Horse Management Group, we saved the Salt River wild horses from a mass roundup/eradication plan almost 5 years ago. Now the future of this iconic herd is again in jeopardy and their future is far from assured!

Five Things You Can Do Today:

The Salt River wild horses need your voice now! Click on the image for each step and you will be directed to a page that will guide you on how to help.

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

Donate

Rocky Mountain Horse Expo

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

IMPORTANT NEWS FOR 2020 RMHE

Join us for the Obstacle Challenge Buckle Series during the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo February 28-Mar 1, 2020

 

 

Introducing the new convenient Award- Winning Mobile Event App

Downloading the Whova app before the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo will enhance your event experience exponentially by having access to a map of the expo, including vendor locations as well as event times and locations, Whova allows you to interact with Clinicians, Vendors and other horse enthusiasts. The Whova app also allows you to get Real-Time Event Updates, Scan Business Cards, Exchange Digital Contacts, and Network even after the RMHE is over.

 

We look forward to seeing you all at the 2020 Rocky Mountain Horse Expo February 28th, 29th and March 1st!

DANDELION NEEDS YOUR HELP – CAN WE SAVE HER? ANOTHER “BIG” RESCUE FROM FAR AWAY – IT’S GO TIME AGAIN!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

ABOVE – How beautiful and precious am I? Please help Mom save me in honor of my brother Christmas!!

I begin this update with heartbreaking news for those of you who haven’t heard,

I had to say goodbye to Baby Christmas. He fought so long and hard, and was improving so much. Sadly we found out that the infection was so bad for so long that it damaged the inside of his neck beyond repair. His wounds were so severe there was simply no way to save him. I loved that little boy beyond measure, and he loved his Mom. Thankfully he passed peacefully, surrounded by love after days of eating his munchies and hangin’ out with Mom. THANK YOU to everyone who stepped up for this beautiful soul.

NOW MEET DANDELION. She shared the same daddy as Christmas, a gorgeous stallion named Black Jack.. So it’s almost like we still have part of him. Now when the tears stream down my face from the agony of losing Christmas, my beautiful Dandelion seems to hug me.

She was also attacked by most likely the same predator as her brother. She has horribly infected wounds that need flushed and cleaned several times a day, as well as needing 4 injections a day. We are praying once again that we get a miracle. Thankfully her prognosis, although a bit guarded, is extremely more positive than Baby Christmas’ was.

Of course we are still paying off vet bills for Christmas and Skipper, as well as 2 of the Sad 7 etc. etc. THANK YOU to my angels who sent payment directly to our account at the vet, or donations to us directly. You are amazing and so appreciated.

It’s time to stock up the barn with hay for the winter. We are currently in the middle of another ongoing rescue. We will share more when the horse is safe. We need to save him (them?), vet him and get him back home. (So glad the roads down south are not covered in ice and snow.)

We so appreciate the love and support. With 4 milk babies going through about $600 worth of milk powder a week, and 30 equine here at the rescue (most of them special needs), it costs a pretty penny to do what we do. So thank you for making it possible to save these lives!

If you want to donate directly to our vet, here is the information.

Zimmerman Veterinary
1 775-623-0981 and let them know it is for “Palomino – Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang”.

PLEASE LET’S “GIT ‘ER DONE” ONCE MORE and save these precious lives!!!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Thank You – Together, We Made a Difference

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

Thank you for believing in AAE and the work we do; 2019 was busy as always. and
made possible by your support and the selfless giving of some very dedicated volunteers!
We look forward to continuing to serve horses in 2020.
In 2019, we took in 32 equines and 28 were adopted, closing the year with an 87.5% adoption rate.
Together we change lives, horses and humans alike.
THANK YOU!
Welcome to a new year and new decade!
Remember, if you select All About Equine Animal Rescue, Inc. as your charity of choice, AmazonSmile donates to AAE with every purchase, at no cost to you!

We’ve Extended Our Hours!

Check out our facebook page for pop-up hours and specials!

Proceeds from the store support AAE operations.

If you’d like to donate tack or join the volunteer team at the store, please send us an email.

 

New Volunteer Needs

As many of you know, we’ve been trying to expand store hours.
TACK STORE SUPPORT:
We need a second person (no experience necessary) to help staff the store on Tuesday, Wednesday, and/or Thursday afternoons, 2p-6p, can you help?
If you’re interested in helping with tack store activities (e.g. cleaning donated tack, researching/pricing, organizing, helping customers, sharing AAE info, admin support, and more), we need you.
Current store hours are Fri-Mon 12-4p, and recently added Thurs hours 2-6p.
We can always use help during any of the current hours, too.
Please email us if you are interested/available Tues, Wed, or Thurs afternoons, 2-6p.
  
ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT:
If you are available to help with administrative activities, we are creating admin hours in the office at the store.
We have a variety of administrative tasks we need help getting done.
Please email us if you are interested/available Tues, Wed, or Thurs afternoons, 2p-6p.

BOOTS & BLING 2020

We have kicked off our Boots & Bling planning for 2020.
The event has included a catered BBQ Dinner, DJ Music and Dancing, Live/Silent/Dessert auctions,
a special fundraiser, and line dancing with instruction.
We need help in most areas for planning for this event to make sure its a huge success for AAE and our horses.
Please email us if you are interested in helping with Boots & Bling.
We meet once a month until the event.
    

SPECIAL PROJECTS AROUND THE BARN

Maybe you’d like to help around the barn, but don’t want to work directly with the horses, or you don’t like to muck?
We could use some help cleaning and organizing, whether it’s the feed room, the meds room, the office, the tools, groundskeeping, painting shelters, monitoring the fencelines, tree trimming, coordinating vehicle maintenance, or a zillion other things.
There’s so much that needs to be done, and
we could use some extra hands to help keep things looking nicer and more clean.
Please email us if you are interested/available during regular barn shifts,
Mon-Sat 8a-noon, Sun 9a-1p or afternoons 3p-6p.
  
Daily Horse Care, especially pm shifts needed now
(Daily 8a-12p or 3p-6p)
Used Tack Store Support, all areas 
(Fri – Mon, 12-4p)
Barn/Facility Maintenance
Foster Homes, Long-Term Foster/Sanctuary Homes
Capital Campaign Support
Board Members
Fundraising/Events
Grants – Writing and Research
Volunteer, Project, and Activity Coordinators
Outreach Activities
Youth Programs
Therapy Programs
Veteran Programs
Special Projects
Admin Support
Marketing
Graphics
Social Media
Bloggers
Photographers
Media and/or Photo Librarian
More, more, more
Interested in volunteering or volunteering in other areas?

Employers Match Donations, Does Yours?

Hey volunteers!
Did you know YOU could earn grant money for AAE from your employer just by volunteering?
Many Employers offer money when their employees volunteer.  Here are a few examples:
  • Intel

    provides a $10 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $5,000 per employee or retiree.

  • Microsoft provides a $17 grant to a nonprofit per every hour volunteered by an employee.
  • Apple provides a $25 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $10,000 per employee.
  • Verizon provides a $750 grant to a nonprofit when an employee volunteers for 50+ hours.
  • State Farm provides a $500 grant nonprofit when an employee volunteers for+ 40 hours.
  • Others top 20 matching gift and/or volunteer grant companies include
    • Starbucks 
    • CarMax
    • Home Depot 
    • JP Morgan
    • Chevron
    • Soros Fund Management 
    • BP (British Petroleum)
    • Gap Corporation
    • State Street Corporation 
    • ExxonMobil
    • Johnson & Johnson
    • Boeing
    • Disney
    • Google
    • Merck
    • Aetna
    • Dell
    • Outerwall (CoinStar and RedBox) 
    • ConocoPhillips
    • RealNetworks
    • Time Warner and subsidiaries
    • AllState
    • and more
Check with your employer.  You could help purchase our next load of hay!

Save Your Ass Rescue Newletter

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The following is from Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue:

A little bit about us..

I have never been happier to see a year come to an end. 2019 has been the most difficult year for Save Your Ass Long Ear rescue since our inception as a non-profit in 2007. At this time last year, I was recovering from a broken leg and messed up ankle.
This is when my friend, and most amazing employee Hannah Exel, stepped up to the plate. She has not backed down since. Hannah has been an animal lover since her childhood; nurtured at the knee of her grandfather Elbridge Bellows. His love of his draft horses got and kept Hannah especially interested in equines.

The “manure hit the fan” in April when we took in six sick donkeys which changed our workload dramatically. Hannah went into overdrive. She worked, and continues to work closely with our wonderful veterinarian, Dr. Kristen Clapp and super tech Remington Morancy, in keeping on top of what animals need and setting up appointments to make sure those needs are taken care of. Hannah is no stranger to hard work and totes hay bales and snow plows driveways and paddocks, and feeds the rescues and cares for them 5 days out of the week. She has become a fencing wizard, ensuring all animals are safely confined within beautiful, straight fence lines. It has been an amazing experience for me to see this young woman who came to work at SYA in 2015 blossom and become a real force to be reckoned with. I am proud that Hannah is not only a valued board member, but Shelter Manager, and has gotten the positive reinforcement bug big time and has become a phenomenal trainer. She is taking Ben Hart’s training course and will be starting Dr. Susan Friedman’s LLA class this month. I would not have made it through this last year without the knowledge that she had my back. The trust and friendship that has developed between us really came into the forefront in 2019. We are in this together.

I also want to thank the wonderful volunteers who help us out in so many ways. We would not be where we are today without the help of Joan Gemme, Andria Elliot, Pamela Kissell, Mike Dunham, Pamela Simmons, Logan, Jennifer Molnar, Regina Molnar, Johnny Carroll, and my amazingly supportive, fun loving B.O.D.; Hannah, Elise Paffrath, JoEllen Barton, and Jean Cross. Hannah’s fiance’ Trevor Allen, and my most amazingly supportive husband Jeff who had no idea what he started when he got me a donkey for my birthday close to thirty years ago. Lastly, but certainly in no way least; YOU!! Our SYA “family” who have been over the top with your support; both emotional and financial this year. Asking for help is very hard for me and I have hated to have had to have done it so often. You folks stepped up big time!!

Hannah and I are very grateful to you all. Best wishes to you all for a healthy, happy, peace and loved filled 2020.

Ann

Hi everyone this is Hannah chiming in as a PS!
I am going to share a little bit about Ann now..

Heres a little info on the Founder of Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue; Ann Firestone. Ann has always loved animals ever since she was a very young age, she used to rescue squirrels, chipmunks, and other small injured animals that crossed her path. Being an animal lover one of her favorite books was Brighty of the Grand Canyon. Since that book, she always wanted a donkey of her own. Ann got her first donkey in 1990. Be Bop a Lula was her name. A small brown miniature donkey with tiny little legs and sweet soft eyes. Ann and Jeff, her husband brought her to their home in South Acworth and their long journey of donkey rescue began!

She took in many other animals people couldn’t take care of anymore, mostly donkeys as you could probably guess. Being a Vet tech for many years she knew how to nurture them to health and either re-home them or keep them as part of her family.

The Rescue has been ongoing since 2006 but officially got the 501c3 status in 2007! Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue was born! Ann and the rescue have adopted out on average 30-40 animals per year, that means SYA has adopted out roughly 400 donkeys and mules, (and one miniature horse) in 13 years! She has been many things over the years, a certified dog trainer who is dedicated to positive reinforcement training, a Vet Tech, a licensed wildlife rehabber, and currently the Co-Founder and President of SYALER. This year has honestly has been a crapshoot. If not for our supporters being so generous the rescue would not still be here.

We have been working double time this whole year just to catch up and to keep the rescue going. I am fortunate to be able to go home from all the chaos at the end of the day and on weekends, but Ann is in it 24/7. I have never met some on who gave so much of themselves and their life to saving animals.  Often times Ann is up late replying to emails, sending thank you notes, and filling orders, she works very hard to keep this whole thing going! She is an amazing person who deserves to be recognized but would never mention any of this herself, so here I am!

Happy New Year to all,

Hannah Exel

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Believe in the Magic of the Season

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

 

It was another busy year and you’ve made this world a better place for some lucky horses.
We hope you have enjoyed the stories you made possible in 2019.
This year, we took in 32 equines and 28 were adopted, closing the year with an 87.5% adoption rate.
Sadly, the need continues on, and there are many more horses waiting for help.
You have one last chance to show our support in 2019
to help us prepare for another year of helping horses in 2020.
We can not do this without you!
Thank you all for your support!

Let us Remember! 

As we conclude our stories reflecting on 2019, and we anticipate the excitement of the new year,
we want to take a moment to remember those we lost.  Sadly, in 2019 we said goodbye to two very special horses, Beau and Calico Girl, as well as our beloved little goat, Cupcake.
Sweet and handsome ol’ Beau brought a lot of smiles and warm fuzzies to many of our volunteers.  In turn, our volunteers gave Beau love to the end, and we were his forever home.
  Sadly,  we had to say goodbye when he experienced a very painful colic
likely caused by a strangulating lipoma.  Miss you, Beau!!
Calico Girl crossed the rainbow bridge after a mysterious pasture accident that resulted in a severe leg fracture.  There was no “fix” that would give her a pain free life.  Cali Girl was a brave, courageous lil’ gal from the start; her loss was a tragic end to our warrior-girl!
We’ll never forget you, Cali Girl.
Cupcake was our teenage goat that had a cancerous lesion around her bottom.  She outlived everyone’s expectations.  Cupcake was the bestest lil’ goat we ever did know.
Cupcake, we miss your strolls to the barn.
We miss your sweat bleats and baaaass.
Cupcake, we miss YOU!
We miss them all dearly, but thankfully,
they left us knowing the sweetest love, care, and compassion.
Goodbyes are hard, but we are grateful for the memories.

The New Year is upon us! 

A New Year and a New Decade!
As we welcome 2020, we resolve to make more happy endings from sad beginnings.
It starts with the horses currently in our care.
They are happy, healthy, and yearning for their forever home.
Every single one wants their own happily ever after.
Will your adoption story be the next one we share?
Learn more about each horse by clicking on it’s name.
Are you looking for your next equine partner?
BELIEVE, your support makes a difference….
DONATEADOPTSPONSOR and you can make more stories come true!
If you’d prefer to mail a check, please make check payable to
“All About Equine Animal Rescue, Inc.” and send to
2201 Francisco Dr. #140-174
El Dorado Hills, CA  95762

We’ve Extended Our Hours!

Check out our facebook page for pop-up hours and specials!

Proceeds from the store support AAE operations.

If you’d like to donate tack or join the volunteer team at the store, please send us an email.

 

New Volunteer Needs

As many of you know, we’ve been trying to expand store hours.
TACK STORE SUPPORT:
We need a second person (no experience necessary) to help staff the store on Tuesday, Wednesday, and/or Thursday afternoons, 2p-6p, can you help?
If you’re interested in helping with tack store activities (e.g. cleaning donated tack, researching/pricing, organizing, helping customers, sharing AAE info, admin support, and more), we need you.
Current store hours are Fri-Mon 12-4p, and recently added Thurs hours 2-6p.
We can always use help during any of the current hours, too.
Please email us if you are interested/available Tues, Wed, or Thurs afternoons, 2-6p.
  
ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT:
If you are available to help with administrative activities, we are creating admin hours in the office at the store.
We have a variety of administrative tasks we need help getting done.
Please email us if you are interested/available Tues, Wed, or Thurs afternoons, 2p-6p.

BOOTS & BLING 2020

We have kicked off our Boots & Bling planning for 2020.
The event has included a catered BBQ Dinner, DJ Music and Dancing, Live/Silent/Dessert auctions,
a special fundraiser, and line dancing with instruction.
We need help in most areas for planning for this event to make sure its a huge success for AAE and our horses.
Please email us if you are interested in helping with Boots & Bling.
We meet once a month until the event.
    

SPECIAL PROJECTS AROUND THE BARN

Maybe you’d like to help around the barn, but don’t want to work directly with the horses, or you don’t like to muck?
We could use some help cleaning and organizing, whether it’s the feed room, the meds room, the office, the tools, groundskeeping, painting shelters, monitoring the fencelines, tree trimming, coordinating vehicle maintenance, or a zillion other things.
There’s so much that needs to be done, and
we could use some extra hands to help keep things looking nicer and more clean.
Please email us if you are interested/available during regular barn shifts,
Mon-Sat 8a-noon, Sun 9a-1p or afternoons 3p-6p.
  
Daily Horse Care, especially pm shifts needed now
(Daily 8a-12p or 3p-6p)
Used Tack Store Support, all areas 
(Fri – Mon, 12-4p)
Barn/Facility Maintenance
Foster Homes, Long-Term Foster/Sanctuary Homes
Capital Campaign Support
Board Members
Fundraising/Events
Grants – Writing and Research
Volunteer, Project, and Activity Coordinators
Outreach Activities
Youth Programs
Therapy Programs
Veteran Programs
Special Projects
Admin Support
Marketing
Graphics
Social Media
Bloggers
Photographers
Media and/or Photo Librarian
More, more, more
Interested in volunteering or volunteering in other areas?

Employers Match Donations, Does Yours?

Hey volunteers!
Did you know YOU could earn grant money for AAE from your employer just by volunteering?
Many Employers offer money when their employees volunteer.  Here are a few examples:
  • Intel

    provides a $10 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $5,000 per employee or retiree.

  • Microsoft provides a $17 grant to a nonprofit per every hour volunteered by an employee.
  • Apple provides a $25 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $10,000 per employee.
  • Verizon provides a $750 grant to a nonprofit when an employee volunteers for 50+ hours.
  • State Farm provides a $500 grant nonprofit when an employee volunteers for+ 40 hours.
  • Others top 20 matching gift and/or volunteer grant companies include
    • Starbucks 
    • CarMax
    • Home Depot 
    • JP Morgan
    • Chevron
    • Soros Fund Management 
    • BP (British Petroleum)
    • Gap Corporation
    • State Street Corporation 
    • ExxonMobil
    • Johnson & Johnson
    • Boeing
    • Disney
    • Google
    • Merck
    • Aetna
    • Dell
    • Outerwall (CoinStar and RedBox) 
    • ConocoPhillips
    • RealNetworks
    • Time Warner and subsidiaries
    • AllState
    • and more
Check with your employer.  You could help purchase our next load of hay!
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