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Putting the Pieces Together – Coalition of State Horse Councils – 2019 Fall Meeting

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

All Equine Organizations Welcomed – Join Us!

State Horse Councils and Equine Organizations

Coming together for Organizational Meetings

Learn how your association can provide the best services possible for your members and organizational leaders. Learn about the importance of relationship building and how to motivate others to become involved in your work.

 

Come and join this gathering of individuals working to build equine organizations across the country. This gathering focuses on our needs as council and club administrators and volunteers in need of ideas and suggestions to help our organizations grow and prosper.

This event will give you plenty of networking with the experts in the field of bringing people together for important equine causes, along wit ideas and systems that help your communications and record keeping for you organization.

This combined workshop, presentations and sessions on how to operate your organization is a 3-day event with a combined registration fee of $95.

Register Now

This link takes you to the Equine City Hall, Build an account as a New Visitor

No costs or memberships required

 

Putting the Pieces Together

Presentations and Speaker

Speakers subject to change

 

Friday: 9-5

Dexter Fowler –

         What motivates people to belong, participate and promote.

Jill Corbin – Ag Tourism

       Ag tourism, building the relationship with all industries.

Courtney Frazier – CO Tourism

       Dude Ranching association and CO Tourism, promoting the lifestyle

LUNCH

Julie Broadway ACH

AHC Legislation and programing updates

Jeff Pryor – Pathfinders Solutions

      Building a foundation 501(c3) to support your organizations.

Chris Sgaraglino – ILGM

     Building your website: awareness, market and educate.

Diane Frasier – Equisure

       Important insurance updates and how to market you membership with insurance.

Evening Networking Round-up

 

Saturday: 8 – 6

The Harmony Equestrian Center – Tour

     Denver Dumb Friends League – Garrett Leonard

Christy Landwehr – CHA

  • Certified Horsemanship: Risk Management

Emily White – ASPCA

  • ASPCA, Equine Programs

LUNCH

Douglas/Elbert County Horsemen Association

Christie Schulte Kappert – The Right Horse

  • The Right Horse Initiative

Carla Zinanti /Jeff Halladay

  • JCART: County Animal Rescue Team

Special Event: Mane Event

Evening Networking Round-up

 

Sunday: 8 – 2

Organizational Technologies

 Equine City Hall

Constant Contact

     VOIP

Randy Rasmussen – BCHA

    Back Country Horsemen: Wilderness Advisor

Dr. John Wade – Microchip ID Equine

     Microchipping Id Systems Equine Program

Sydney Ayers, APR, Fellow PRSA

  PR, Social Media, Marketing Social Media

 

Coalition of State Horse Council Meeting – 12PM

Meeting Hotel

Marriott Courtyard

Denver Stapleton

 

Marriott Courtyard Hotel

7415 E 41st Ave, Denver, CO 80216

(303) 333-3303

$89.00 Room Rate

Must Make Reservation by Sept 20th!

 

Courtyard Marriott Website

Transportation from DIA

Denver International Airport

RTD Light Rail

Transportation from the Airport $10.50 (Each Way)

RTD Light Rail – Central Park Station – Hotel Pick up

DAILY SCHEDULE FROM UNION STATION

3:15 a.m. – 4:15 a.m. – every 30 minutes

4:15 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. – every 15 minutes

6:30 p.m. – 12:30 a.m. (1 a.m. Fri/Sat) – every 30 minutes

*Last train leaves Denver International Airport at 1:26 a.m. (1:56 a.m. Fri/Sat)

 

For more information contact

Bill Scebbi

Bill@coloradohorsecouncil.com

Texting is best at

720-261-0294

VSV – CDA Warns against Misinformation- 8-16-2019

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

August 16, 2019

Colorado Department of Agriculture warns against vesicular stomatitis misinformation

Stay informed!

 

For information all equine diseases

Equine Disease Communication Center

Great information on all equine health notices and needs.

Don’t leave home with your horse until you have

 check this site out!

 

Stay informed and help us protect your rights as Horse Owners
Join or Renew your Colorado Horse Council membership online today!

 

Did you know you can renew membership or become a new member online at the Equine City Hall?  Just  Click Here!

Save the postage and the time, and renew today!

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 16, 2019

Veterinarians and Livestock Owners Contact:  Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office, 303-869-9130

Media Contact:  Mary Peck, 303-869-9005, mary.peck@state.co.us

 

Broomfield, Colo. – As Colorado’s livestock communities continue to manage a significant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) outbreak affecting 20 counties across the state, misinformation about the virus is being shared on social media channels and traditional media outlets. The initial source of the inaccurate reporting, comparing VSV to a “rabies-like” virus, was an  Associated Press article that was reposted by a number of media outlets. The article has since been corrected.

“It is highly misleading to say that vesicular stomatitis virus is a rabies-like virus.  Both viruses belong to the same family, Rhabdoviridae, but that classification is based on viral structure alone,” said Maggie Baldwin, Epidemiology Traceability Veterinarian for the Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA).”The two diseases have no similarities in transmission, clinical signs, or outcome.”

VSV is a virus from the genus Vesiculovirus. VSV is a viral disease that causes blisters and ulcers on the mouth, feet, ears, and udder of cattle, horses, and swine, and occasionally mules, donkeys, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas. The rabies virus is from the genus Lyssavirus.  Rabies is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system of mammals and has an extremely high case fatality rate.

VSV is not considered a highly contagious virus, as it is spread primarily through insect vectors, and rarely through saliva or other contact. Please refer to the CDA VSV website for accurate information and resources.

CDA has confirmed cases of VSV in Adams, Alamosa, Arapahoe, Archuleta, Boulder, Broomfield, Conejos, Delta, Douglas, Gilpin, Grand, Jefferson, La Plata, Larimer, Mesa, Mineral, Montezuma, Montrose, Morgan, Ouray, Pueblo, and Weld counties.

ALL VSV cases are important for the epidemiology and management of this outbreak and MUST be reported to the State Veterinarian’s Office at 303-869-9130, regardless if the owner and veterinarian decide to have their livestock tested or choose to manage as positive premises based on the presence of typical clinical signs without testing.The only cases that may be managed as suspect positive are equine cases located in counties that have confirmed cases.

Equine owners and livestock producers across the state are impacted by VSV; all livestock owners should carefully watch the case numbers and affected counties to gauge their level of risk and institute mitigation measures.

The total count of premises under quarantine for VSV by county is outlined in the table below.  CDA’s Animal Health division is updating this table regularly with the latest data on its CDA VSV website.

FULL TABLE HERE

Please see the USDA APHIS Veterinary Services website to read the current situation report for all confirmed cases in the U.S.

The first case of VSV in Colorado was reported on July 3rd in Weld County by a field veterinarian from the State Veterinarian’s Office at the Colorado Department of Agriculture.  An incursion of VSV-infected insect vectors is the likely source of infection. There are no USDA approved vaccines for VSV.

Vesicular Stomatitis Background
Vesicular stomatitis is a viral disease that primarily affects horses and cattle but occasionally swine, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas will show clinical signs. The transmission process of VSV is not completely understood, but includes insect vectors such as black flies, sand flies, and biting midges.

The incubation period ranges from 2-8 days. Clinical signs include vesicles, erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, ears, teats, and coronary bands. Often excessive salivation is the first sign of disease, along with a reluctance to eat or drink. Lameness and weight loss may follow.

Humans may become infected when handling affected animals, but this is a rare event.  To avoid human exposure, individuals should use personal protective measures when handling affected animals.

Tips for Livestock Owners

  • Strict fly control is an important factor to inhibit the transmission of the disease.
  • Avoid transferring feeding equipment, cleaning tools or health care equipment from other herds.
  • Colorado veterinarians and livestock owners should contact the state of destination when moving livestock interstate to ensure that all import requirements are met. Contact information for all state veterinarian offices is listed here.
  • Colorado fairs, livestock exhibitions, and rodeos may institute new entry requirements based on the extent and severity of the current VS outbreak. Certificates of veterinary inspection (CVIs or health certificates) issued within 2-5 days prior to an event can be beneficial in reducing risks. Be sure to stay informed of any new livestock event requirements. See the Vesicular Stomatitis Guidelines for Shows and Fairs.

 

Important Points for Veterinarians and Horse Owners

Any vesicular disease of livestock is reportable to the State Veterinarian’s Office in Colorado – to report call 303-869-9130. If after hours, the voice message will indicate which staff veterinarian on call.

 

Additional resources

VSV – All Cases of VS are Important – 8-2-2019

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

August 2, 2019

Colorado State

Veterinarian’s Office

ALL VSV cases are important

Stay informed!
Stay informed and help us protect your rights as Horse Owners
Join or Renew your Colorado Horse Council membership online today!
Did you know you can renew membership or become a new member online at the Equine City Hall?  Just  Click Here!
Save the postage and the time, and renew today!

Vesicular stomatitis cases are now confirmed in 14 Colorado counties

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 2, 2019
Veterinarians and Livestock Owners Contact:  Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office, 303-869-9130
Media Contact:  Mary Peck, 303-869-9005,mary.peck@state.co.us

Broomfield, Colo. – The Colorado Department of Agriculture has confirmed cases of vesicular stomatitis (VSV) in the Colorado counties of Adams, Archuleta, Boulder, Broomfield, Conejos, Delta, Jefferson, La Plata, Larimer, Mesa, Montezuma, Montrose, Morgan, and Weld.

ALL VSV cases are important for the epidemiology and management of this outbreak and MUST be reported to the State Veterinarian’s Office at 303-869-9130, regardless if the owner and veterinarian decide to have their livestock tested or choose to manage as positive premises based on the presence of typical clinical signs without testing.The only cases that may be managed as suspect positive are equine cases located in counties that have confirmed cases.

While an individual equine case may not seem vitally important, the case numbers and case management as a whole (diagnostics, movement restrictions, issuance of hold orders and quarantines) are critical.

“It is of utmost importance that livestock owners report VSV occurrences and comply with hold or quarantine orders to limit the potential for disease spread in this VSV outbreak.” said Colorado State Veterinarian Dr. Keith Roehr.

Equine owners and livestock producers across the state are impacted by VSV; all livestock owners should carefully watch the case numbers and affected counties to gauge their level of risk and institute mitigation measures.

The total count of premises under quarantine for VSV by county is outlined in the table below.  CDA’s Animal Health division is updating this table regularly with the latest data on its CDA VSV website.

Please see the USDA APHIS Veterinary Services website to read the current situation report for all confirmed cases in the U.S.

The first case of VSV in Colorado was reported on July 3rd in Weld County by a field veterinarian from the State Veterinarian’s Office at the Colorado Department of Agriculture.  An incursion of VSV-infected insect vectors is the likely source of infection. There are no USDA approved vaccines for VSV.
Vesicular Stomatitis Background
Vesicular stomatitis is a viral disease that primarily affects horses and cattle but occasionally swine, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas will show clinical signs. The transmission process of VSV is not completely understood, but includes insect vectors such as black flies, sand flies, and biting midges.

The incubation period ranges from 2-8 days. Clinical signs include vesicles, erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, ears, teats, and coronary bands. Often excessive salivation is the first sign of disease, along with a reluctance to eat or drink. Lameness and weight loss may follow.

Humans may become infected when handling affected animals, but this is a rare event.  To avoid human exposure, individuals should use personal protective measures when handling affected animals.
Tips for Livestock Owners

  • Strict fly control is an important factor to inhibit the transmission of the disease.
  • Avoid transferring feeding equipment, cleaning tools or health care equipment from other herds.
  • Colorado veterinarians and livestock owners should contact the state of destination when moving livestock interstate to ensure that all import requirements are met. Contact information for all state veterinarian offices is listed here.
  • Colorado fairs, livestock exhibitions, and rodeos may institute new entry requirements based on the extent and severity of the current VS outbreak. Certificates of veterinary inspection (CVIs or health certificates) issued within 2-5 days prior to an event can be beneficial in reducing risks. Be sure to stay informed of any new livestock event requirements. See the Vesicular Stomatitis Guidelines for Shows and Fairs.

Important Points for Veterinarians and Horse Owners

Any vesicular disease of livestock is reportable to the State Veterinarian’s Office in Colorado – to report call 303-869-9130. If after hours, the voice message will indicate which staff veterinarian on call.

 

Additional resources

VSV – 21 Cases – Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Confirmed in Colorado

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

July 12, 2019
Colorado State
Veterinarian’s Office
Vesicular Stomatitis
21 Cases Confirmed  Weld, La Plata and Larimer Counties, Colorado
Stay informed!
Stay informed and help us protect your rights as Horse Owners
Join or Renew your Colorado Horse Council membership online today!
Did you know you can renew membership or become a new member online at the Equine City Hall?  Just  Click Here!
Save the postage and the time, and renew today!
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 12, 2019
Veterinarians and Livestock Owners Contact:  Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office, 303-869-9130
Media Contact:  Mary Peck, 303-869-9005, mary.peck@state.co.us

Broomfield, Colo. – The Colorado Department of Agriculture has additional confirmed cases of vesicular stomatitis (VSV) in La Plata, Larimer, and Weld counties. The total count of premises under quarantine for VSV by county is outlined in the table below.  CDA’s Animal Health division is updating this table with the latest data on its CDA VSV website.

Learn more

Support the Colorado Horse Council

VSV -Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Confirmed in Colorado

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

Colorado State
Veterinarian’s Office
Vesicular Stomatitis Case Confirmed in Weld County, Colorado
Stay informed!
Stay informed and help us protect your rights as Horse Owners
Join or Renew your Colorado Horse Council membership online today!
Did you know you can renew membership or become a new member online at the Equine City Hall?  Just  Click Here!
Save the postage and the time, and renew today!
Horses in Weld County, Colorado test positive for vesicular stomatitis
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 5, 2019
Veterinarians and Livestock Owners Contact:  Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office, 303-869-9130
Media Contact:  Mary Peck, 303-869-9005, mary.peck@state.co.us

Broomfield, Colo. – Colorado has become the third state in the U.S. to have confirmed cases of vesicular stomatitis (VSV). Previous positive cases of vesicular stomatitis in 2019 have been diagnosed in Kinney and Tom Green counties in Texas and in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

On July 3rd, the National Veterinary Services Laboratory reported positive test results on samples submitted from two horses in Weld County. The two horses reside on separate locations in Weld County and have been placed under quarantine. The initial Colorado disease investigation was completed by a field veterinarian from the State Veterinarian’s Office at the Colorado Department of Agriculture.

“Vesicular stomatitis can be painful for animals and costly to their owners,” said Colorado State Veterinarian, Dr. Keith Roehr. “The virus typically causes oral blisters and sores that can be painful causing difficulty in eating and drinking.”

The Weld County epidemiological investigation indicates an incursion of VSV-infected insect vectors is the likely source of infection. Biosecurity measures and vector mitigation have been instituted on both locations to reduce the potential spread of the virus. The animals are being monitored daily and the index premises will remain under state quarantine until at least 14 days from the onset of lesions in the last affected animal on the premises. There are no USDA approved vaccines for VSV.

Vesicular Stomatitis Background

Vesicular stomatitis is a viral disease that primarily affects horses and cattle, and occasionally swine, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas. The transmission process of VSV is not completely understood, but includes insect vectors such as black flies, sand flies, and biting midges.

The incubation period ranges from 2-8 days. Clinical signs include vesicles, erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, teats, and coronary bands. Often excessive salivation is the first sign of disease, along with a reluctance to eat or drink. Lameness and weight loss may follow.

Humans may become infected when handling affected animals, but this is a rare event.  To avoid human exposure, individuals should use personal protective measures when handling affected animals.

Tips for Livestock Owners

  • Strict fly control is an important factor to inhibit the transmission of the disease.
  • Avoid transferring feeding equipment, cleaning tools or health care equipment from other herds.
  • Colorado veterinarians and livestock owners should contact the state of destination when moving livestock interstate to ensure that all import requirements are met. Contact information for all state veterinarian offices is listed here.
  • Colorado fairs, livestock exhibitions, and rodeos may institute new entry requirements based on the extent and severity of the current VS outbreak. Certificates of veterinary inspection (CVIs or health certificates) issued within 2-5 days prior to an event can be beneficial in reducing risks. Be sure to stay informed of any new livestock event requirements. See the Vesicular Stomatitis Guidelines for Shows and Fairs.
Important Points for Veterinarians
Any vesicular disease of livestock is reportable to the State Veterinarian’s Office in Colorado – to report call 303-869-9130. If after hours, the voice message will indicate which staff veterinarian on call.
Additional resources

CDA Vesicular Stomatitis Information

Support the Colorado Horse Council

Colorado Horse Council June Newsletter

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

2019 Heritage Ride Recap

This year’s Heritage Ride was a success! Participants enjoyed riding their horses on the Arapahoe Racetrack and watching the Arabian, Thoroughbred and Quarter horses race.

Riders took their horses through the Colorado Obstacle Challenge Series and 10 people won Cinch western shirts as a prize for their participation in the poker ride.

 

“The barn tours gave participants behind the scenes access to the racetrack and the opportunity to learn the innerworkings of the industry,” said Bill Scebbi, MNM, executive director of CHC.

CHC thanks everyone who participated and continues to support Colorado’s equine industry.

Save the date for the next ride! The CHC will host a ride in Douglas County on September 7. More details to come.

 

You can still participate! Donate Here to help support the work of the Colorado Horse Council.

Donate Here

 

 

 

Mid-Year Membership Renewal/New Membership Offer

It’s not too late to renew your CHC membership this year! Renew today to benefit from exclusive member opportunities, services and discounts for the rest of the year.

Here are a few ways that your membership makes a difference:

-Membership fees help pay lobbyists to promote equine interests at the State Capitol

-Allows you to make informed decisions with legislative updates about the equine industry

Here are a few ways your membership directly benefits you:

-$1 million worth of excess liability insurance for equine activities

-2 Rocky Mountain Horse Expo Grounds Admissions tickets

-A business listing in the CHC member directory

-Discounts and member rates with associated equine companies

-Access to member mailing lists/directories/newsletters/email bulletins

Renew your CHC membership at Renew here

Become a new CHC member at Join here

 

Chip Your Horse

Microchipping your horse is more important than you may think. The grain-of-rice-sized chip can prevent theft, help recovery after disasters and gives your horse a permanent ID.

An estimated 40,000 horses a year are taken from their owners either by strangers or opponents in civil or legal disputes. Microchipping your horse allows you to report he/she as stolen and help authorities find your horse much easier.

After the chaos of a natural disaster, a microchipped horse is much easier to locate and return to you. As Colorado residents, we face the threat of fires, floods and tornadoes. Your horses could go missing in these disasters and an unchipped horse could be impossible to return to the correct owner.

Finally, it’s affordable. The microchip and lifetime registration is $20 through the Colorado Equine Microchipping program. From there, you can call a veterinarian at your convenience to insert and register the microchip. A horse microchipped through the Colorado Equine Microchipping Program will meet all the required criteria to register for events and races.

To learn more about CHC’s microchip program visit

Microchip my horse

 

“Support the Horse” License Plate Program

Looking for a unique way to support Colorado’s equine industry? Purchase a “Support the Horse” license plate for $30. All proceeds fund statewide research, education and promotion that enhances the equine industry in Colorado.

This year we are making it easier than ever, the process is now online. This makes the program more secure and easily accessible. Here are the simple steps to get started:

  • Donate online to the CHDA Support the Horse Program License plate program
  • Receive a DMV pin number by email
  • Bring the pin number with you to the DMV and show the pin number and email to the clerk

Show everyone you support Colorado’s equine industry and they should too!

 

VSV -Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Confirmed in Texas

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

Colorado State
Veterinarian’s Office
Vesicular Stomatitis Case Confirmed in Kinney County, Texas
Stay informed!
Stay informed and help us protect your rights as Horse Owners
Join or Renew your Colorado Horse Council membership online today!
Did you know you can renew membership or become a new member online at the Equine City Hall?  Just  Click Here!
Save the postage and the time, and renew today!
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 25, 2019

Veterinarians and Livestock Owners Contact:  Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office, 303-869-9130

Media Contact:  Mary Peck, 303-869-9005, mary.peck@state.co.us
Broomfield, Colo. – On June 24, 2019, the Texas Animal Health Commission announced a confirmed case of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) in a horse located in Kinney County. While several hundred miles from Colorado, the case is concerning to livestock owners in Colorado due to the potential of a northward movement of the virus throughout the summer.
The transmission of VSV is not completely understood but includes insect vectors such as black flies, sand flies, biting midges, as well as mechanical transmission and livestock movement.
“This recent confirmation of VSV in Texas serves as a reminder that livestock owners must be vigilant in safeguarding their herds from this virus,” said Colorado State Veterinarian, Dr. Keith Roehr. “Now is the time to start thinking about disease mitigation practices to protect Colorado’s livestock.”   Learn more
To stay informed of equine diseases and equine health across the country and in your area, please refer to the
These quick links can be found on
The Colorado Horse Council work very closely with the Colorado Ag Department and the the Equine  Disease Communication Center to be certain the Colorado  equine community is aware and informed of important information regarding your animals health.
Support the Colorado Horse Council

 

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