Monthly Archive for: ‘May, 2022’

YOU can help end inhumane helicopter roundups. Here’s how.

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Earlier this year, Congress took a historic step towards reforming the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Wild Horse and Burro Program when it passed its Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 omnibus spending bill. This bill required the BLM to spend up to $11 million to implement a robust fertility control vaccine program as a humane alternative to cruel helicopter roundups.

Now, Congress’ FY23 appropriations process is in full swing. Right now, Senators are submitting their priorities for the federal appropriations language — and we need your help to ensure next year’s spending bill includes efforts to protect wild horses and burros. 

Our Government Relations team here at AWHC is working hard on Capitol Hill to divert funding away from the BLM’s helicopter roundups and towards humane fertility control vaccines that keep wild horses on public lands. But we can’t do it alone. We need as many voices as possible to echo our message and urge Congress to enact a pro-horse and burro agenda for 2023.

Can you contact your two U.S. Senators right now and ask them to ensure the BLM’s FY23 budget reflects humane management strategies on behalf of our beloved wild horses and burros?

TAKE ACTION →

We are incredibly proud that Congress’ FY22 spending bill included important language championed by AWHC and our allies in Washington like U.S. Representatives Steve Cohen (D-TN) and Dina Titus (D-NV), U.S. Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ), and over 60 other members of Congress!

But Meredith, the BLM is still set on its mass removal plan using brutal helicopter roundups, and starting on July 1, roundup season for wild horses will begin again in full force. Captured horses and burros are suffering RIGHT NOW in BLM holding facilities across the West. In the BLM’s Cañon City corrals, at least 138 wild horses have died from Equine Influenza Virus in just over two weeks.

This is unacceptable. We cannot continue to round up wild horses and burros from their native habitats, cram them into holding pens, and expect a good outcome for the animals or the taxpayers who are stuck funding this broken system.

Our next steps are critical. To ensure the BLM puts a stop to roundups and shifts towards a humane solution, we MUST secure ongoing funding for fertility control vaccines. That’s why we need your help today. Will you call on your Senators to support $11 million in humane fertility control vaccine treatments in the FY23 spending bill?

TAKE ACTION →

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

Chilly Pepper – Wild mare with a new baby needs your help. New Kids are here! Update on Rumors!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Quick Note – Happy Mother’s Day!

This beautiful Mare & Foal Pair, Belle & Blondie, and one gorgeous yearling Gabby, are officially the first on the “Wild Side” at Camp Chilly Pepper!

We now have starving GG Norma, the Mare & her weeks old foal, the yearling and so far we still have our precious Rumors.

Sadly “Rumors” is not doing well and has a horrible heart issue. She is much like Norman was, not functioning with enough oxygen and struggling to survive.

These horses need your help, and so do I, lol. Lots of special feed, vetting and transport costs are horrible right now. Please help if you can!!

Thank you as always for all the love and support. I still need help to give our precious rescues the care and love they need.

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR BEING PART OF OUR FAMILY AND FOR SAVING SO MANY LIVES!

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weonda Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.
Please say a prayer I have an ‘old lady” bag and this isn’t milk, and I am not gonna have a little one. I am too old and tired and thin for that!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

We *herd* it’s Mother’s Day!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Mother’s Day can be a challenging time for many of us – especially for those who cannot be with their moms or who have lost loved ones. Our team is thinking of you today. Please make sure to look after yourself and feel free to skip this message if you need.

From all of us here at AWHC — Happy Mother’s Day!

Photos by Mary Hone Photography

Today we’re celebrating mothers of all kinds and the nurturing spirit that brings new life into this world and guides it through. 

Moms do so much for us. They are the backbone of so many of our families! That’s why today, we’re taking a break from our usual messaging to say: 

To all the wonderful moms, grandmas, stepmoms, and moms-to-be out there — THANK YOU for all that you do! 

We support you and today especially, we celebrate you. Have a very happy Mother’s Day! 

— American Wild Horse Campaign

Big Barney’s says, It’s Not Over Yet! There’s Still Time to Give Big!!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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You are giving big today, and we are so grateful. This is the spirit that changes lives! We are so close to our goal, with about $2000 to go, and if you give more, we’ll add another load of hay to the list!

Barney is another fan favorite. He came to AAE back in January 2019 with a bundle of issues. Barney was underweight by 250 to 300 pounds, he had respiratory issues, he had an intestinal issue, and he had some basic care needs that hadn’t been met.

He rebounded quickly. At one point, he was eating 54 pounds of pellets a day. Now, he’s a pretty easy keeper and takes in 15 to 20 pounds of pellets a day. Barney likes his girls, too. At any given moment, if you see ol’ Sierra in the pasture, Barney is usually right by her side. Poor mare, there are days you can see her thinking….”can I please just have a day to myself???”

For those that don’t know, Barney is a 23 (-ish) year old Belgian Draft Horse! He’s 17.0 hh and weighs in at nearly 1,500 pounds. His kind eye and gentle giant ways have made him a volunteer favorite. When he arrived at 20-ish, we knew he was well into his golden years, and we were lucky to have a sanctuary spot for him. Now at 23-ish, he’s upping the average life span for drafts.

Barney has a current need we are exploring. As many of you know, AAE volunteers are the eyes, ears, and voices for the horses in the program (and beyond). One day not so long ago, a very observative volunteer noticed Barney had streams of water coming out of his nostrils while he was drinking from a trough. With the help of a scope, our docs discovered his epiglottis is displaced. Unfortunately, due to a few challenges with equipment that day, we couldn’t get to the cause. We’ll know more after another scope. There are at least a couple possibilities, one is a bit easier to fix than the other. If it’s on the good side, a reasonably easy surgical procedure can help him. If not, he’s not a good candidate for the other surgery due to his age, size, and breed. So, keep your fingers crossed for a good outcome for this big guy. Your help today helps us provide care needed to give horses like Barney the best we can.

Big Day for Big Barney, right? Well, he thinks every day is a big day. For now, he and Sierra will head off for an evening stroll, leaving us with a great rear view! Love those big butts!!

Barney says thank you for helping him when his life looked so grim. You picked him up and brought him back to a good place, and he wouldn’t have found is girl, Sierra if you hadn’t. He’s cheering you on to Give Big and help him, help others. We’re so close to our goal! Help us cross that line! Donate, share the link, share his story, and share your love of horses.

DONATE

DONATE

It’s not to late, you too can raise the bar by pledging matching funds now! Inspire giving and double your donation to make your impact twice as BIG! To learn more about starting your own matching funds campaign for AAE, send us an email.

 

LearnersPermit

Longears Music Videos: Learner’s Permit: Miniature Donkeys Augie and Spuds

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See more Longears Music Videos

UPDATE: More than 124 wild horses have now died at this BLM facility

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Last week, we alerted you to a highly contagious and deadly infectious disease outbreak occurring in real time at the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Cañon City holding facility in Colorado. In just the last 11 days, at least 124 wild horses have died in these holding pens — making this possibly the deadliest disease outbreak in BLM history.

Nearly 2,500 wild horses are confined in this facility and remain at risk  — please speak up for them now by calling on your members of Congress to demand an investigation into the BLM’s holding corrals.

Since we last emailed you, the BLM was able to identify the virus that has killed dozens of these cherished animals — Equine Influenza Virus (EIV) — a virus that the BLM is supposed to vaccinate wild horses and burros against once they are rounded up and removed from the wild.

The BLM reported that the 124 mustangs killed were either entirely unvaccinated or only partially-vaccinated against the deadly virus even though they had been at the facility for over 9 months. 

At the same time, an active disease outbreak is occuring at the BLM’s off range holding corrals in Wheatland, Wyoming, where a highly contagious bacterial infection that causes strangles has so far infected half of the 2,750 horses confined there.

This developing situation raises serious concerns about the conditions in the BLM’s off-range holding system where 59,749 wild horses and 862 wild burros are being held — and we deserve answers.

Please contact your members of Congress now to call for an investigation into the BLM’s off-range corrals. Also, urge them to support federal appropriations language to allocate at least $11 million of the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program budget to fertility control vaccines to keep wild horses and burros in the wild and out of holding facilities in the first place.

TAKE ACTION →

Thanks for your help.

— AWHC Team

———- Forwarded message ———
From: ACTION ALERT! via AWHC <contact@americanwildhorsecampaign.org>
Date: Wed, Apr 27, 2022 at 6:26 PM
Subject: BREAKING: Wild horses are in danger at this BLM facility
To: <meredith@luckythreeranch.com>

Since Saturday, at least 67 wild horses have died in a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) holding facility in Colorado due to an unidentified, highly contagious, and deadly infectious disease. 

More than 2,500 BLM-managed wild horses are confined to the Cañon City facility where this outbreak occurred and are at risk. You could help us speak up for them by contacting your members of Congress calling for an investigation into the BLM’s off-range corrals.

TAKE ACTION →

This is the second government holding facility to close in recent weeks due to disease outbreaks related to the intense confinement of these wild animals. 

RIGHT NOW → almost 60,000 wild horses and 862 wild burros are confined in BLM off-range holding facilities. And with plans to remove 19,000 more wild horses and burros from public lands this year, the BLM is putting thousands of these innocent animals at risk.

And  — wild horses and burros aren’t just dying from disease in these facilities. Records show that hundreds of mustangs are dying from traumatic injuries like broken necks, skull fractures, broken legs, and even evisceration from castration surgeries following capture at government facilities across the country.

These wild horses do no harm where they belong — in the wild, but our government is placing them in harm’s way by cramming them into crowded holding facilities.

We must protect the thousands of federally-protected wild horses and burros in captivity today, but Meredith, we need your voice to help them. 

Please take action to protect these cherished animals by contacting your members of Congress now to call for an investigation into the BLM’s off-range corrals. >>

TAKE ACTION →

Thanks for taking action — we’re grateful for your support.

AWHC Team

Chilly Pepper – Meet “RUMORS” – Beautiful, trampled filly rejected by Mama

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Idaho Mission – The sorting of the Idaho horses went perfectly.

Of course there was a little excitement with some of the kids, but no one was injured and they are now being picked up by their adopters. Thank you for helping them. Us being able to bring our equipment and get them vetted meant the literal difference between adoptions or ????

BABY CALL – Phone rang last night and Cam and I jumped in the truck and headed out.

This beautiful (approximately) 2 week old filly is a tough one.

She was trampled by her band and her Mama just left her. Mama has zero interest in her so she was pulled and separated, hence the phone call.

We honestly have no idea if she will be ok, or if she has internal injuries. Hopefully it is just tenderness from bruises. (Having full size horses rushing over, and stepping on you and into you would easily leave you sore for a few days.) She has scrapes all over nearly every part of her body. Her eye was smacked and swollen and she obviously took a hard hit in her face. Her legs are severely swollen and she is exhausted and very shaky.

She is extremely fragile but oh my gosh, what a sweetheart! She needs prayers, meds and groceries. I have a call into Doc for bloodwork as soon as she can come out.

The back axle? snapped on the trailer right after we pulled in. Never a dull moment, but again, God keeps us safe!

“Great Grandma Norma” is here. No one wanted her, (she is old and starved nearly to death) and when I was asked if we would try and help her, of course I said yes.

She is in need of lots of TLC, groceries and prayers that she is Not preggers.

So appreciate the love and support. These kids are spendy to save, but God puts them in front of us for a reason! If you would like to help it would be so appreciated!

Thank you as always for all the love and support. I still need help to give our precious rescues the care and love they need.

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR BEING PART OF OUR FAMILY AND FOR SAVING SO MANY LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weonda Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

Please say a prayer I have an ‘old lady” bag and this isn’t milk, and I am not gonna have a little one. I am too old and tired and thin for that!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

 

Jennings says “On Your Mark, Get Ready, It’s Time to Go, Give!!”

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

Our gratitude for your support is immense! Thank you! Your support is changing lives, one horse at a time!! Super great news, we’ve met our match, and as we write, we are more than halfway to our goal with $19,385, and we’re narrowing the gap to $25,000.

Jennings is another special horse that’s here today because of you! He’s still looking for his very special person, too. Are you his forever?

JENNINGS

Jennings is a handsome guy that came to AAE from the same distressed mustang sanctuary situation in the latter part of 2020. Like Chesney, Clare, and Teea, the sanctuary had cared for him (and many more), for about 20 years before falling on hard times. The horses were living in desert conditions. Because a big storm took out portions of perimeter fencing on the property years before, most were in their own small stalls (24′ x 24′ at most), each with a small shelter (roof only). No turn out, no attention. Because Jennings had been ridden in the past (prior to landing at the sanctuary) and was readily halterable unlike some, he got privileges. Though he was in a stall when we first met, the next time, we learned he was in a rotation of horses that roamed the property and had access to a stack of hay. Not only was on the thin side and past due for basic care, he had a sizable and uncomfortable looking growth on the side of his sheath that urgently needed veterinary attention.

Jennings is a 2005 BLM mustang. He’s goofy, he’s curious, he’s playful, and he’s a character! He’s really a big personality. Though he’d like you to think he is, he’s not the most confident guy. He also loves the girls, and he will protect his girl fiercely (whomever she is at the time). Though he’s pretty good when taken from the herd, he doesn’t much appreciate his girl being taken from the herd (for grooming, hoof care, vet exam, etc.). He really enjoys attention, but has moments of insecurity that need a handler who is a bit more experienced to understand.

From the time we first met Jennings until we picked him and the others up two weeks later, the growth had doubled in size. And from the time we got him to AAE and the vet saw him until the biopsy results results came, it had doubled again. We confirmed it was a squamous cell carcinoma, and it definitely needed to be removed. Not only was it likely painful, but it was a fly attractant extraordinaire. Fortunately, surgical removal was successful, and we were elated to know that Jennings was left with clean margins around the prior growth.

Playful, charismatic, hilarious, that’s Jennings. He’s usually easy peasy to halter, lead, farrier, trailer, etc. Saddle or bridle him, no worries. Usually. Add a rider, and he gets a little less confident, a little less “usually”. That said, we really believe with the right person, this guy can shine, and the way he defends his girls so fiercely, we think he’ll care for his person just the same, if he’s given the time, patience, and effort he so deserves. Does that sound like a match for you?

He’s so playful in the herd, and sometimes he’s really a pest. He chases, he nips, he instigates, and he raises the bar. He and Ryder have a bromance going, and he even gets our senior, bitchy-broad (oops, did I say that) Bonnie to be playful in his games. My goodness, she rears tall in her antics with this silly guy, and it’s hard to believe that she’s in her 20s, but she sure gets it goin’ and gives it back! The right home would have another horse with a similarly big personality, so their playful antics can go on…. and on … and on! You won’t be bored with this guy, that’s for sure!

Jennings is still waiting for that home of his own. If you have experience with mustangs, are looking to make a special bond, and you have another playful horse, you might be the one he’s looking for!

Jennings so appreciates the opportunity you gave him for a better life! He says it’s a BIG day, and he knows you have a lot of nonprofits to choose from. He wants to pay it forward by asking you to help us meet our goal and help other horses like him. Donate, share the link, share a story, and share your love of horses.

DONATE

Thanks to so many of you, we’ve met our match, and we are inching toward our goal of raising $25,000 by midnight tonight! We are only a little over $5,000 away, and we have just over 12 hours to go!

Your support today will help with the rising costs of hay, feed, fuel, and other operational needs. We are confident you are going to get us through the finish line however you can: donate, share, share, and share more, spread the word about AAE, and put in a good word for the work we do.

Please consider making a donation to AAE in honor of Jennings!

DONATE

It’s not to late, you too can raise the bar by pledging matching funds now! Inspire giving and double your donation to make your impact twice as BIG! To learn more about starting your own matching funds campaign for AAE, send us an email.

 

These Three Girls!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

As we’re settling into our new home in Pilot Hill, it seems the perfect time to reflect on some of the special horses you have helped over the years.

We are all so very thankful, incredibly grateful, and unbelievably blessed to have your support in making better the lives of so many horses!!

This beautiful trio is still looking for a home. Chesney, Clare, and Teea are so very bonded, the ideal situation is for them to move to a home where they can be together. They are mid-teens and each very unique!

CHESNEY, CLARE, and TEEA

Three red-headed mares, oh my! Chesney, Clare, and Teea came to AAE from a distressed mustang sanctuary situation in the latter part of 2020. The sanctuary had cared for these girls, and many more, for about 20 years before falling on hard times. They were living in desert conditions, each in their own small stall (24′ x 24′ at most), each with a small shelter (roof only). No turn out, no attention. They were in need of basic care, it had been deferred much too long. It was a sad sight, needless to say. Though not a lot of handling, they each wanted to trust, and they trusted enough to follow us quietly onto the trailer, as if they new it was the path that offered the hope of something better, a new beginning.

CHESNEY

Chesney was so incredibly shy and uncertain. She stood firm, but trembled. The fear in her eyes, and the quiver in her body spoke volumes, but she was willing. She allowed a slow reach below her neck and behind her ears to place a halter, then a lead. Slowly, she followed. She tried so hard to understand what was asked and then oblige.

Chesney is a 2006 BLM mustang. She got the works (e.g. dental, hoof care, vaccines, deworming, and a microchip) shortly after arriving at AAE. She’s slowly blossomed since arrival. She’s gaining confidence, and she becoming a greet you in the pasture kinda girl. Chesney still needs to grow some confidence, but she’s come a long way, and with a steady, confident person of her own by her side, she has a ton of potential. She halters, leads, and loads, though not fearlessly. She still needs some patience and reassurance.

Her hooves and body condition have improved immensely, and she’s absolutely gorgeous strutting her stuff with Teea.

CLARE

Clare was a bit more confident. She new humans were her ticket to food. That said, she had her limits, namely, anything around her hind end. Beware! We got one warning, and didn’t test her limits. That said, if we respected her hind end, she was easy peasy. Poor mare had been suffering some gnarly allergies. She had large raised scarred areas on all of her legs, like scar over scar over scar. She had a rogue hoof. It was much longer than the rest, and it sure seemed uncomfortable as it rotated outward when she walked.

Clare is also a 2006 mustang. She also got the works shortly after arrival at AAE (e.g. hoof care, dental care, vaccines, deworming, and a microchip). Her legs were treated with an antibiotic ointment long-term, and they have improved tremendously.

Clare (left) is a sassy one. She’s a mare for sure. Opinionated, strong-willed, and sweet as pie when she wants to be. She’s learning to live in a cooperative way, maybe not with all the other horses, but she’s understanding cooperation among the two-leggers is the way to go. Humor aside, she’s got a really sweet side, and she enjoys being in the company of humans, in the pasture or in a smaller space.

TEEA

Teea was such a red hot mess, a diamond in the rough. She was a pathetic sight with pancakes for front hoofs, and she, too, was so very scared. She trembled, but stood planted while introducing the halter and lead. It took a few times to assure her we meant no harm. Giving her time to understand and patience to earn her trust was enough. As the saying goes, with mustangs, slower is faster. She walked as if she had scuba flippers on her front hooves. If only we had nippers in the trailer, it would have made the long road easier. She loaded fine then, though she’s not so confident loading now.

Teea is a 2007 mustang. She too got the works shortly after arrival at AAE (e.g. hoof care, dental care, vaccines, deworming, and a microchip). Her hooves took a few trims to get them right, but she’s maintaining very well with maintenance trims now.

Teea’s confidence comes from her girls, mostly Chesney. If she loses sight of her, she loses her mind, kinda. It takes a big effort to bring her back to thinking about whats in front of her at hand. She’s getting better with time, but it’s clear, Chesney and Clare are her world. To separate them at this point would be an injustice to the bond they have. Teea is definitely most heavily bonded. With all of the space they have now, where there is one, there are three. They are looking for a home, together. Can you imagine looking out your window and seeing three beautiful redheads??? It would be the perfect ending to their time with AAE.

Chesney, Clare, and Teea are still waiting for that home of their own. If you have experience with mustangs, love the bonds you make with them, and would like to be a fabulous solution for these three big, beautiful personalities, it would be a dream come true for all of us!

No matter what, Chesney, Clare, and Teea appreciate the opportunity you gave them for a better life!

Big Day of Giving is the perfect day to honor them and other horses like them!

DONATE

Gentle reminder, a generous donor has offered to match dollar for dollar, every dollar donated, up to $5,000 for Big Day of Giving from now through midnight tomorrow, May 5! We are just over the halfway point at $2531 since the match was announced. We have just over 24 hours to meet our match!

Our goal for Big DOG is to raise $25,000 to help with the rising costs of hay, feed, fuel, and other operational needs. We are quite a ways from our goal, but we’re confident you are going to help us get there however you can: donate, share, share, or share more, spread the word about AAE, and put in a good word for the work we do.

Please consider making a donation to AAE in honor of the three redheads tomorrow for BDOG, and DOUBLE your impact.

DONATE

It’s not to late, you too can raise the bar by pledging matching funds now! Inspire giving and double your donation to make your impact twice as BIG! To learn more about starting your own matching funds campaign for AAE, send us an email.

 

Oh Danny Boy, We Love You So!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

unnamed-1

As we’re settling into our new home in Pilot Hill, it seems the perfect time to reflect on some of the special horses you have helped over the years.

Another oldie but goodie is elderman, Danny! This ol’ guy is well known for his sweet demeanor and his hugs.

DANNY

Danny’s story isn’t one of neglect, abandonment, abuse, or poor care. Sadly, it’s one of human health and aging. Danny was loved beyond words. So much, his former owner considered euthanizing him rather than risk him having difficulties transitioning to a new home, ending up in a bad home, or worse, the fear of auctions and the slaughter pipeline. It was an emotional day for all when we picked Danny up and brought him home to AAE.

Danny’s owner’s health was failing, and she was unable to provide ongoing care for him any longer. He knew no other owner, as he was born to her mare. Mama rejected him for four days, and on the fifth day, Mama finally accepted him. Danny spent those four days with his surrogate mom while she held mom and made sure he was able to nurse, initially go get the colostrum he needed. It was a very rocky start, but Danny and his other mom grew a bond like no other. She trained him; she rode him; they competed together. They spent 27 years together until they had to say good bye. Fortunately, the timing was right, and Danny had special people in his life that paved the way for him to get to AAE. He arrived in 2017, and at 27, we knew Danny would spend the rest of his years with us.

You can see the pattern here! Danny loves everyone he meets, and he is very generous with his hugs. Similarly, everyone that meets Danny falls instantly in love the moment he rests his chin on their shoulder. The emotions are palpable! Everyone simply melts when he rests his head on their shoulder.

Danny is another sanctuary resident that helps teach new volunteers how to work around horses. He very much enjoys interacting with humans, and spa days getting groomed. Danny is the most kind, mellow, and affectionate horse we have known, and we are so grateful he is here.

Danny appreciates the kindness you’ve shown him and his herd mates! Big Day of Giving is the perfect day to honor Danny and other horses like him!

DONATE

A generous donor has offered to match every dollar donated for Big Day of Giving from now through May 5 up to $5,000!

Please consider making a donation to AAE in honor of Danny this week for BDOG, and you’ll DOUBLE your impact.

DONATE

You too can raise the bar by pledging matching funds now! Inspire giving and double your donation to make your impact twice as BIG! To learn more about starting your own matching funds campaign for AAE, send us an email.

Big Day of Giving is this Thursday!

You can double the impact of your donation by helping us meet our initial goal to match $5000. [Help us reach our goal of $25,000 by making an early gift anytime from now until May 4 at midnight or donate on the BIG DAY itself.

DONATE

Every gift makes a BIG difference for the horses!

Your gifts this Big Day of Giving will help the horses in so many ways including providing feed, veterinary care, and hoof and dental care. Hay prices have skyrocketed with the early weather this year. Your donations help assure we have ample funding for the care of our horses.

If you’d prefer to donate by mailing a check or via PayPal or Square, those are options, too. Send us an email, and we’ll send you the address or a link.

Big Day of Giving (BDOG) is a 24-hour online giving challenge to help AAE and other non-profits in the Sacramento area to raise funds and awareness. But you can support us on BDOG wherever you live!

There is a $15 minimum for all BDOG donations

To learn more about Big Day of Giving, visit www.bigdayofgiving.org.

DONATE

Tickets will be available next month!

Boots & Bling is AAE’s most important fundraising event of the year for our horses and horses-in-need. There are many ways to support this event!. Sponsor the event? Sponsor a table? Donate to our auctions? Can you help? Together, in many ways, we can make a difference for horses like Danny!

If you are interested in volunteering, sponsoring, or donating, please send us an email describing your interest to bootsnbling@allaboutequine.org.

Interested in volunteering at event? We are looking for volunteers to help with the Boots & Bling teams in the following areas: event planning and decor, sponsorships and auctions, ticket sales, and volunteer coordinating. We will be scheduling a planning meeting soon!

If you are interested in volunteering, sponsoring, or donating, please send us an email describing your interest to bootsnbling@allaboutequine.org.

Thank you in advance!!

The History of Horses in North America

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The image of a wild horse, free and running through a rugged landscape, has long been the symbol of the American West. This is echoed in our film and literature and contributes to the idea of America as a bold new landscape. However, much of the history of wild horses in America is disputed. The origin of this species is a debate that looks not only at the deep history of our planet, but also the claims to land management and ecology that various organizations and communities are involved in, to this day.

The once common idea that horses arrived in the “New World’ via Columbus in 1492, has now been discussed in several publications that look at the prehistoric records of North America. Wild horses have always been a part of the North American landscape. It is the question of whether or not this animal is “native” or introduced to the landscape that haspeople looking closer at this narrative.

Read More →

Help us make Burro Awareness Month a National Holiday!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

It’s the first day of May – and you know what that means – the first day of Burro Awareness Month!

We started Burro Awareness Month back in 2012 to highlight the beauty of one of our favorite equine species, the majestic wild burros of the American Southwest, and to educate the public about the unique struggles they face.

While wild mustangs often get the spotlight, burros tend to get left out of the conversation. So we dedicate this month every year to raising awareness about all things pertaining to our beloved burros – and , it’s about time we make it a national holiday!

Will you join us in calling for Burro Awareness Month to become a nationally-recognized holiday? Sign our petition below!

SIGN THE PETITION →

Burros were first introduced to the Southwest desert by the Spaniards in the 1500s and served as a reliable companion to explorers and pioneers on their treks throughout the West in the centuries thereafter. Originally from Africa, these pack animals were prized for their hardiness in arid environments!

They worked tirelessly to carry supplies and machinery to mining camps and became indispensable to the workers of the West. At the end of the mining boom, many burros escaped or were turned loose, and with their innate ability to survive under the harshest conditions — wild herds eventually formed and flourished.

They’re not just rugged work animals though…wild burros are also some of the most adorable and cuddly creatures you’ll ever see! They have long ears, a short mane, and vary in color from black to brown to gray and even to pinto!

We’re sure that if more people learned about these beautiful creatures, burros would get the credit and attention they deserve! So this May, we are once again asking for your help to spread the word about our beloved wild burros. Will you sign on to our petition today to help make Burro Awareness Month a nationally-recognized holiday?

SIGN THE PETITION →

Thanks!
AWHC Team

Is Amigo One of Your Favorites!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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As we’re settling into our new home in Pilot Hill, it seems the perfect time to reflect on some of the special horses you have helped over the years. None is more special than our elderman, Amigo. At 33, he is the grand dad of all the horses enjoying their new views in Pilot Hill.

AMIGO

Amigo came to AAE with two of his pals in mid-January 2018 from a neglect situation. He weighed-in about 850 pounds, and we were told he was 29. As thin as he looks in photos, he was much thinner. His coat was thick with dead like an old shag rug that tried to hide his bony frame. He was started on a slow refeeding program, but despite efforts of a very slow introduction to food, after about a week at AAE, he had a bout of colic.

 

It felt so grim, but this ol’ guy was a warrior. Thankfully, Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center was on site quickly. It wasn’t a bad colic, but he battled through it like the survivor he is! He bounced back up to his like he’d waken from a bad dream, then never looked back. He was also covered with ticks, with a good 150 or so removed and finding more every day for several days, then more each day until they were gone.

A year or so later, he was transported to the vet for another bout with colic and was fortunately able to return home to the herd after a few days. Over the years, he’s had some ups and downs, but this old fart (yes, those that know him, know), has been the bestest gentleman ever to new volunteers learning about horses, and all of our volunteers that care for him every day, come rain, sleet or snow….and the hella hot days, too!

For a multi-tude of reasons: what he went through, his will to survive, his age, his demeanor, his kind and gentle spirit, and not last nor least, the way he acted so terrified at what must have been the first mini horse he’d ever seen, we all fell madly in love with this big oaf and felt AAE should be his last stop. He’s been a resident program/sanctuary horse since. Looking at him now, it’s hard to believe it’s the same horse!

At 33, this beautiful ol’ guy exemplifies how your support helps horses like Amigo. This old man got another chance at life when his world looked so grim. He got love, he got to live like a horse, he was treated with love, kindness, empathy, and respect.

He is an ambassador for horses to everyone that meets him. He is patient, he’s kind, and he’s one of the most trustworthy horses at AAE. He’s is a perfect reminder of how fragile yet resilient horses are. He holds no grudges for humans, even though he wasn’t treated so kind in his prior life, and he gives back so much to everyone he encounters.

Amigo is so grateful to have had your support giving him another chance.

Amigo is so grateful to have had your support. If Amigo’s story resonates with you, please consider making a donation to AAE in honor of Amigo on the Big Day of Giving May 5, if you can. If you don’t want to wait, you can give now.

If his story inspires you to do more, please share his story and how you help horses like Amigo.

You can raise the bar by pledging matching funds now! Inspire giving and double your donation to make your impact twice as BIG!

DONATE

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MULE CROSSING: Looking Objectively at Your Equine

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By Meredith Hodges

Before most of us learn anything about horses, mules and donkeys, we tend to initially perceive them as large, strong and durable animals that can safely carry us anywhere we want to go and can participate in any number of equine events. This is essentially true. However, there can be a number of pitfalls along the way if you do not educate yourself and practice good maintenance, feeding and training practices.

Equines, like people, are comprised of living tissue, bones, muscles and tendons that can often experience improper growth and development, which can compromise their performance. This is why it is important to feed your equine’s living tissue, bones, muscles and tendons a healthy diet and exercise him in a way that builds these elements using natural and non-stressful techniques that will help your equine to strengthen properly in the right frame, or posture.

It is also important to make sure the tack you use fits well and is adjusted properly. An equine that is experiencing soreness from ill-fitting tack will be distracted from his best performance. Improve your own skills by taking care of your own body as you observe and condition your equine. The person who eats healthy food, exercises in good posture and improves his or her own general conditioning, coordination and Horsemanship skills will not be out of balance and will not compromise the equine’s ability to perform.

Let’s take this one step at a time. First, make sure that your equine is stabled in a place where he has adequate shelter from the elements, plenty of room to exercise himself when you are not there, clean water and a good feeding schedule. When an equine is nervous or high strung, it can usually be attributed to this very elemental beginning. Many show horses are kept in 12-foot by 12-foot stalls with limited turnout during the day, usually only an hour or two. Think about this for a minute. The equine is a grazing animal and his natural health is enhanced by what he eats and the fact that he is moving with his head down most of every day of his life. The only time his head is truly raised is when he is on alert.

The equine that is stabled in a stall isn’t urged to have his head down for any more time than it takes to eat up the loose hay after his feedings. His body is forced to remain in a very small range of movement and he can become stiff and sore when asked to do things that require more flexibility in his work. When fed high protein feeds in this situation, he is not able to expend the energy to burn this feed, and it can manifest itself in nervous and anxious behavior. Therefore, it is critical to your equine’s health that he is not only fed the right kinds of feeds and supplements, but that he is able to expend this energy in a healthy way for his body to grow and develop properly.

Muscles in the equine’s body, like our own, are structured in distinctive layers and are supported by ligaments and tendons. These muscles need to be strengthened in a specific order for optimum performance. Whether he is a foal or an older animal, his athletic conditioning needs this taken into consideration. The first exercises should be passive and easy to facilitate the strengthening of the core muscles closest to the bone. This is done with exercises on the lead line. It is not as important that he learns to negotiate obstacles on the lead line as it is how he negotiates the obstacles on the lead line.

On the approach to an obstacle, your equine needs to be relaxed and comfortable. It is your job as his trainer to show him how to do this. When you lead in good posture, walk straight lines and make smooth, gradual arcs and turns, you will encourage your equine to do the same. Using short pauses between changes of pace or direction will help your equine to stay calm and receptive to training.

For instance, when approaching a bridge, walk with your equine’s head at your shoulder as if you were in a showmanship class. Stop at the foot of the bridge and encourage your equine to stretch his nose down and investigate the bridge in order to allay any fears he might have. When your animal has indicated he is not afraid by once again raising his head level with his withers, you can proceed. Face the bridge straight on, looking straight ahead and, while keeping his head at your shoulder, take the first step straight forward and onto the bridge, making sure he follows and places one front foot on the bridge itself. Next, ask him to place the other front foot onto the bridge, stop, square up his four feet (as in Showmanship) and reward. Continue forward in a straight line. Once all four of his feet are on the bridge, stop, square up and give him a reward. Then continue across the bridge maintaining your own good posture, hesitate at the last step, and then step off carefully, in good balance and with a coordinated effort. Ask him to place his two front feet on the ground while leaving the back feet on the bridge, stop, square up and reward. Your equine will learn to follow your lead and execute the task in the same balanced and coordinated manner and will be able to halt on command at any location.

In the beginning, your equine may be fearful and nervous about going over the bridge or any other obstacle. It is enough at this time that he gets over his fear and just crosses it, whether it is done with finesse or not. Once he is over the fear of crossing the obstacle, you can begin working on his ability to cross with finesse, balance and coordination. The longer you work on perfecting the negotiation of an obstacle in a balanced and coordinated way, the stronger the participating muscle groups will become and the more comfortable and automatic the movement will become until it develops into a habit.

The part you play in all of this is very important. You will discover that if you are not in balance and coordinated in the way you move with your equine, the less balanced and coordinated he will be. If you don’t walk straight, then neither will he. If you are not confident in your approach, then he won’t be either. Even something as simple as the tack you use will play a big part in your equine’s performance. If the halter is too small or too large, it can cause irregular pressure on your animal, preventing him from complying with your wishes. How you move your equine’s head with the halter and lead line can affect his performance. Pay attention to how hard you need to pull to get even the smallest response and be ready to release pressure immediately upon compliance. But again, when releasing pressure, just give him enough slack to release the pressure and not so much that you have a lot to take back later. This will help him keep his attention on you and the task at hand. Keep this minimal degree of pressure-and-release throughout his work. Even if he backs away from an obstacle, just give little tugs followed by a release to allow him to back and then encourage him to re-approach the obstacle by coming from another angle or by coaxing him with the promise of a reward upon his attempt. Another approach is to go to the end of the lead rope, keep the rope taut and invite him to come forward by revealing the oats reward he will get when he complies. Take up the slack as he approaches. Avoid resistance at all costs!

Halters that are too loose allow too much lag time between the time you ask by giving a tug and the time the equine receives the message. This usually results in an over-reaction from your equine and then an over-reaction from you as you try to correct the mistake. A halter that is too tight can be a distraction because it can create sore spots—the equivalent to a headache and no one likes to perform with a headache! The lead line typically should be a length that you can easily handle and that will give your equine some room to move away, but that can be reorganized easily, usually about six to eight feet long.

No matter how careful you may be, there will always be times when your equine will experience some kind of soreness from playing too hard in the pasture or from kicking in a stall, to any number of daily hazards. How he is negotiating his obstacles and how he performs certain movements will give you clues to how he is feeling. Learn to watch every step your animal takes, how his feet are placed, how his body is moving and the look on his face as he performs a given task.

This is when it can be beneficial to know the basics of equine massage therapy. There is a lot that you, as your equine’s trainer, can do without a professional equine masseuse, but you should always consult with a professional for lessons on how you can do your part. Make sure that the equine masseuse you decide to use is a person who knows equines and has at least 500 hours experience with equine massage therapy. Once you learn some massage techniques, you can often alleviate minor soreness exhibited by your equine. When your equine senses that your goal is to make him comfortable as well as successful in his work, he will be much more willing and able to comply.

The specifics of training techniques covered in this article can be found in the Equus Revisited manual and DVD.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

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