Monthly Archive for: ‘May, 2022’

Boots & Bling Tickets On Sale Today!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

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Dust off your boots and get ready to party

because ticket sales for our 9th annual Boots & Bling

will be available at noon today, Tuesday, May 31!

The event will be held on Saturday, August 6 at the

El Dorado County Fairgrounds, in Placerville.

Doors open at 4pm.

This evening features a catered BBQ dinner by Blackjack Grill,

and DJ music and entertainment by Sundance Kid,

live and silent auctions, stories from our barn, and more.

Boots & Bling is AAE’s most important fundraising event of the year. This event supports our ongoing operations and allows us to continue helping horses, one horse at a time.

We hope you’ll join us!!

Act quick! This event has sold out the past five years, and our early bird ticket price is good through June 15, 2022

Buy Tickets!

(This link will be active at noon today when registration opens)

Please remember – If you want to sit together, buy together!

Tacking Up Appropriately 4 14 209

CHASITY’S CHALLENGES: Tacking Up Appropriately: 4-14-20

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4-14-20

Selecting the right tack for your Longears is essential to success. I rigged a cob-sized English bridle for Chasity with a pony Eggbutt snaffle bit (4 ½-inch), an over-sized Warmblood brow band to accommodate her wider forehead and not pinch her ears, and normal nose band with an “O” ring installed underneath with a lead rope attached. The “Elbow Pull” is the correct length and is put in place over the crown piece of the bridle and wrapped with a halter fleece to prevent rubbing on her poll. She will begin her postural core strength leading exercises to correct her unbalanced posture, her lordosis (sway back) and the enlarged fat roll across her neck.

When first putting on the light-weight surcingle, I loosely tighten the girth at first to allow her to get used to the pressure around her middle.

Then, of course, a reward for standing still is in order and very much appreciated. And it’s always nice to receive a loving donkey head-hug!

After this appropriate show of affection, I politely ask her if she is ready to accept the bridle. Chasity truly appreciates my consideration for her.

When I put on the bridle, I make sure that her ears are protected as I pull the crown piece over her ears by covering them with the palm of my hand. Then, when it is in place, I just pull my hand away from it’s position. I center the “O” ring and lead rope underneath her chin and snugly tighten the nose band.

With Chasity’s enlarged neck, I felt it would be beneficial to use a neck sweat to help to shrink the fatty deposits along her crest during her workout. I then took up more slack on the surcingle girth and loosely adjusted the “Elbow Pull” on the right side.

Next, I went around to the left side to adjust the tension on the “Elbow Pull.” Next, I went to the front, straightened her head in alignment with her spine, and checked to make sure that she could not raise her head high enough to invert her neck and back. It is tight enough to encourage her to use her abs, and raise her back. This positively affects her sloppy tendency to relax her sway back and will bring it into proper posture.

Now we are prepared to begin work in the Hourglass Pattern in the indoor arena. We begin to walk in sync.

After the workout, we go back to the designated work station to untack. I carefully remove her bridle, sliding it over her ears with one pass, lifting it upward as it goes over the ears. Then I remove the surcingle and neck sweat, and give her a generous reward for her cooperation.

The next step is to take the tack into the tack room, wipe it down and wash the bit before hanging it back up on the wall. Taking care of your tack and equipment in this manner prevents dirt build-up, chafing on the animal and weakened tack and equipment. Then, once a month, we spend time in the tack room going over all of the tack and equipment with Leathernew™  to keep it all in good condition. The cabinets where we store harness is lined with cedar to prevent mold and mildew. Once everything is back in place, I return Chasity to her stall and run. When your tack and equipment fits properly and is appropriate for the activity, it promotes success and enhances your experience together!

Chilly Pepper – DIRE EMERGENCY – 911 for Pregnant mare, stallion and baby loading TOMORROW & SHIPPING TOMORROW

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

How fast things change.

Received an urgent call for these 4 lives. They were scheduled to ship today, but I now have until this evening to make a 50% down payment to buy 3 days.

We need $9000 to bail these 4 lives, get them vetted and transported back home.

God put them in front of me again, I did not go looking or even check up on them.

All I know is I have to try. If you would like to help, PLEASE MARK YOUR DONATION FOR THE “LAST MINUTE HORSES”. IF we do not get enough money, I will refund your donation for these horses.

This is the 1st time I am questioning if we can pull this off. All I can do is share it with y’all, and pray we can save them. Mama looks starved in the photo with her baby. Imagine being bred on top of that. Ughhhh

Do We Save Them? It’s up to you. AGAIN, if we don’t raise enough funds and you mark your donation “Last Minute Horses”, I will refund your $.

I HAVE to put the deposit down by this evening, and it is NON-REFUNDABLE. So I have to be sure we will have enough or I can’t risk rescue funds.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weona Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

This year, wild burros are facing an unprecedented assault on their populations, thanks to the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) mass roundup and stockpile plan.

Even worse, the agency is using helicopters instead of bait trapping to chase the animals into traps. Historically, burro helicopter roundups have been traumatic for the animals. Unlike wild horses, burros are incredibly stoic and stand their ground in the face of danger. This has led to documented instances of abuse, such as helicopter skids striking a burro, as well as abusive handling practices by BLM contractors.

AWHC sent observers to document the first three operations on the schedule, and unfortunately witnessed many issues we raised concerns about when we heard the helicopters would descend on our beloved burros. Below is a recap of each roundup, but first we need you to speak up for wild burros and call for a halt to helicopter roundups! 

TAKE ACTION NOW

Centennial, Panamint & Slate Herd Areas, California: Completed

The Centennial, Panamint, and Slate Range Herd Areas (HA) encompass roughly 1.7 million acres of public and private land and are home to an estimated 500 wild burros. The BLM has plans to remove every wild burro from these HAs — a decision AWHC legally appealed.

AWHC had a field representative on site but was not permitted by the BLM to view any of the operations citing “safety concerns.” We did visit the burros in the wild, and checked on those recently captured in holding throughout the week. There was no shade at the facility for the burros, where temperatures right now are reaching the 90s.

The goal of the operation was to capture 490 burros, zeroing out the whole population, but the roundup concluded early with 181 captured. There was one death after a jenny (female burro) suffered a head injury, and injuries such as “rope burn” were reported.

Sinbad Herd Management Area, Utah: Completed

The Sinbad Herd Management Area (HMA) encompasses 99,241 acres of public and private lands and is currently home to 328 burros. As part of a 14-year-old plan, the BLM set the Appropriate Management Level (AML) for these burros to a mere 50-70 animals.

AWHC had field representatives on the ground for the majority of the operation. We witnessed several violations of the Comprehensive Animal Welfare Program including contractors reportedly leaving captured burros on stock trailers for potentially hours with no visible access to water and excessive roping, which led to a burro being knocked to the ground.

This roundup ended early, only capturing 153 wild burros instead of the BLM’s goal of approximately 300. There was one death, after a 7-year-old burro fell into a 5 foot crevice while being pursued by a wrangler. His body was left on the range, where AWHC observers found him the day after he was euthanized.

Black Mountain Herd Management Area, Arizona: Completed

The Black Mountain HMA encompasses over 1 million acres of land in northwestern Arizona. This vast habitat is home to — according to BLM estimates — 2,900 wild burros, making these burros one of the largest and most genetically healthy burro populations in the country. The BLM planned to remove approximately 1,080 wild burros.

AWHC had field representatives on the ground, but the public observation was extremely limited. The BLM kept us over ~300 yards from the trap site on flat ground and the contractor’s trailers blocked our view of the captured burros in the trap. From the little we could see, burros were chased for long distances and seemed stressed. One burro even crashed into a gate panel and one burro entered the trap, obviously distraught and from what we could see, attempted to charge the wranglers. The BLM even granted the contractors permission to use electric cattle prods on several animals while loading them onto trailers. But the abuse didn’t stop there. 

The BLM’s own Comprehensive Animal Welfare Program Assessment reported that the contractor’s staff treated burros in an abusive and inhumane manner, including “aggressively hitting and jabbing the paddle into the sides and sensitive areas of burros.” Despite the violations, the roundup continued on for several weeks. The operation concluded on May 25, with 1,109 burros captured.

Wild burros represent the historic and pioneer spirit of the American West and they deserve to be treated as such! So, as we close out Burro Awareness month, please take action to protect them from cruel and brutal helicopter roundups. They need your voice now more than ever.

TAKE ACTION

— The AWHC Team

FWD: You won’t want to miss these speakers! >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

In just two short days we’ll be hosting “A Wild Night: A Series of Short Films” — please join us this Sunday, May 29 at 7pm ET/4pm PT for this virtual event that you won’t want to miss!

RSVP HERE

During the event, we’ll be showing a series of documentaries featuring our beloved wild horses with an expert panel discussion to follow! Hear from our distinguished speakers:

Greg Hendricks is Director of Field Operations for the American Wild Horse Campaign. As an avid wild horse advocate, he has worked to support the Prison Adoption Program in Carson City from which he has adopted two wonderful mustangs. He also represents Wild Horses & Burros for the Bureau of Land Management’s Sierra Front N.W. Great Basin Resource Advisory Council.

Erik Molvar is the Executive Director of the Western Watersheds Project. He is a wildlife biologist with published research in the behavior, ecology, and population dynamics of Alaskan moose as well as large-scale conservation planning. He spent 13 years as a conservation advocate and later Executive Director of Biodiversity Conservation Alliance, and led WildEarth Guardians’ Sagebrush Sea Campaign for three years.

Erick Lundgren is a postdoctoral researcher at Aarhus University in Denmark, receiving his PhD at the University of Technology Sydney in Australia. His work primarily focuses on novel ecosystems or communities composed of both introduced and native species. Most of his research focuses on large herbivores, in particular equids, in which he has shown remarkable ecological processes hidden by notions of ‘naturalness’.

Scott Wilson is a landscape photographer of 20 years and team member of the American Wild Horse Campaign. Scott was recently named Open Photographer of the Year in the 2022 Sony World Photography Awards and also brought home the Natural World & Wildlife Award for “Anger Management,” which depicts a wild Colorado mustang kicking up a dust-storm.

Kris Thompson is a leader in the Reno area business community. He is the Project Manager of the Tahoe Reo Industrial Center which encompasses 1/3 of the Virginia Range horse habitat in Reno, NV and is President of the Tahoe Reno Industrial Center General Improvement District. Kris is a member of the Storey County Planning Commission and is a retired army cornel who commanded combat troops in Desert Storm and other conflicts.

Meredith, this event is sure to be a hit! Please join us this Sunday, May 29 at 7pm ET/4pm PT to hear from our expert panel, watch documentaries that celebrate our cherished wild herds, and learn more about our work to keep these animals in the wild where they belong! Click here for more information and to RSVP for the virtual event.

RSVP HERE

We hope you’ll join us!
— American Wild Horse Campaign

———- Forwarded message ———
From: American Wild Horse Campaign <contact@americanwildhorsecampaign.org>
Date: Wed, May 25, 2022 at 8:20 PM
Subject: Save the Date: A *Wild* Night this Sunday, May 29 >>
To: <meredith@luckythreeranch.com>

Please join us on Sunday, May 29 at 7pm ET/4pm PT for “A Wild Night: A Series of Short Films” featuring our beloved wild horses and an expert panel discussion to follow! Click here for more information and to RSVP for the virtual event.

Our cherished wild horses capture the American public’s imagination like no other animal. The image of magnificent mustangs running wild on the vast open range embodies the best of America, our independent and free spirit.

While technically protected by federal law, wild horses and burros continue to face constant threats, diminishing their chances of survival in the West. In just the last year alone, some of the largest wild horse helicopter roundups in recent history have occurred and will continue into 2022.

Our team is leading the way to protect these iconic animals and the western public lands where they roam. 

Please join us this Sunday, May 29 to learn about the latest science and the groundbreaking programs we’ve implemented in Nevada to keep wild horses wild. A series of short documentaries will be shown and an expert panel discussion featuring biologists, researchers, business leaders, and range specialists will follow!

RSVP HERE

Thank you and we hope you can join us!

American Wild Horse Campaign

Chilly Pepper – Quick Updatel – Trixie is thriving, & Current News and Help Needed to Keep Saving Lives!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Quick Update.

Trixie is doing fabulously. She is a happy, “Lead Mare” type of gal, and thinks she is our “gift”. I love her madly and so appreciate the love and support that helped save her life.

GG Norma is doing well. Although she is gaining lots of weight, we are still worried she might be pregnant. Ms. Tricks is also doing well and enjoying life at Camp Chilly Pepper.

Sadly, due to having to move our WA “camp”, Chilly Pepper needs some Extra help to be ready for this rescue season. However, the move is actually a HUGE BLESSING!

Our Immediate Needs” _Foal Lac Powder, Hay in NV & WA, Fencing materials, $ for vet bill, grain for GG Norma & Tricks. We need to restock meds, milk, and all the various supplies needed to say “yes” to saving more lives.

I am down to my last bucket of milk. (Apparently the other 2 buckets are pellets, not powder lol.)

We need hay at home and at “Camp”. The cost is approximately $2500 for the load in NV and to get hay for the horses here.

Good news – the Vet bill is finally down from over $4000 to around $2600? – (Yay) However we still need Coggins and a health cert for Tricks.

Due to our unexpected move, we are in desperate need of more panels, fencing materials or funding to purchase more. We need to make sure the horses are safe from the local predators as well as putting up adequate fencing to continue rescuing wild horses. We also need to purchase more shelters. I have 5 acres at my disposal, yet I need perimeter fencing as well as shelters and runs for the rescues.

Catcher called today, and it could get crazy in the next month. We need Your Help now to purchase the necessary materials so we can say Yes to saving more horses!

Thank you for helping us with these critical needs. Right now the wilds are free and enjoying the abundance of grass and water. Every day they are still out there is a blessing for them. Sadly, “go time” is coming soon.

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR BEING PART OF OUR FAMILY AND FOR SAVING SO MANY LIVES!

I saw a gorgeous golden bear today. He crossed the road in front of us twice. He was very thin and was his coat rough looking, but a good reminder of how important safety for the babies is! There are lots of cats and wildlife here and we need to take extra precautions to keep our littles safe. We never want to see another DaBubbles situation. ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7UdtB_vucE )

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weona Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

LMV Jasper

Longears Music Videos: Jasper Takes Bishop

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Save the Date: A *Wild* Night this Sunday, May 29 >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Please join us on Sunday, May 29 at 7pm ET/4pm PT for “A Wild Night: A Series of Short Films” featuring our beloved wild horses and an expert panel discussion to follow! Click here for more information and to RSVP for the virtual event.

Our cherished wild horses capture the American public’s imagination like no other animal. The image of magnificent mustangs running wild on the vast open range embodies the best of America, our independent and free spirit.

While technically protected by federal law, wild horses and burros continue to face constant threats, diminishing their chances of survival in the West. In just the last year alone, some of the largest wild horse helicopter roundups in recent history have occurred and will continue into 2022.

Our team is leading the way to protect these iconic animals and the western public lands where they roam. 

Please join us this Sunday, May 29 to learn about the latest science and the groundbreaking programs we’ve implemented in Nevada to keep wild horses wild. A series of short documentaries will be shown and an expert panel discussion featuring biologists, researchers, business leaders, and range specialists will follow!

RSVP HERE

Thank you and we hope you can join us!

American Wild Horse Campaign

 

TT 63

LTR Training Tip #63: Ground Driving Lateral Obstacles

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This is your equine’s turn to take a leadership role in your partnership as you execute lateral obstacles on the drive lines. Navigating obstacles in this manner will instill mutual confidence and trust.

Download Detailed Description

See more Training Tips

UPDATE: Join Governor Polis in standing up for Colorado’s wild horses!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Over the past several weeks, we’ve been keeping a close eye on the deadly infectious disease outbreak occurring at the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Cañon City facility in Colorado — and keeping you updated along the way.

By now, the Equine Influenza Virus (EIV) has killed at least 144 horses at the facility since April 23.

Yesterday, Colorado Governor Jared Polis took necessary action when he released a statement calling for a halt to the Piceance wild horse roundup planned for this summer while an investigation into the BLM’s Cañon City facility and the welfare of it’s warehoused horses is conducted.

We have long advocated for the health, safety, and wellbeing of Colorado’s wild horses, and will continue to do so as we seek a humane future for our mustangs.” – Gov. Jared Polis. 

AWHC is incredibly grateful to Governor Polis for his leadership in protecting these iconic animals, but we need more elected officials to speak up on their behalf! Can you lend these horses your voice and call on your members of Congress to demand an investigation into the BLM’s holding corrals?

TAKE ACTION →

EIV — a virus that is routinely vaccinated against in the equine world — is included in the BLM’s vaccine regiment for captured animals. And yet, all of the 144 deceased wild horses were either unvaccinated or only partially vaccinated against EIV, despite being rounded up late last summer and in the BLM’s care for nearly 10 months. 

The crisis only confirms what we already know — our beloved wild horses are safest in the wild. Rounding up horses and confining them in cramped pens where they are susceptible to deadly diseases like EIV is unacceptableespecially when there is humane, scientifically-proven birth control readily available as an alternative to removals.

Captured wild horses need your help. Please contact your members of Congress RIGHT NOW to call for an investigation into the BLM’s off-range corrals.

TAKE ACTION →

Thank you for standing up for Colorado’s wild horses,

– AWHC Team

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Wrangler’s Donkey Diary: Sarcoid Treatment Again

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1-29-20

Wrangler had his first sarcoid removal on 7-20-18, but we found another one just a few weeks ago starting under his right side. It looked like he had been rubbing it as it was a bit crusty. I had a mule that did that to a sarcoid and it eventually disappeared as did the other two that were on his body. He apparently built immunity against the sarcoids. So, we opted to wait and see if this one on Wrangler would also just go away. It didn’t and it was now the size of a golf ball and would need to be removed. We treated Wrangler’s prior sarcoid with Xterra because of its location in a vascular area, but this one could safely be surgically removed.

Our veterinarian, Greg Farrand, shaved the area for the IV catheter.

We opted to do the surgery in our tack and groom area where things could be kept clean. Kim handed Greg the catheter while I kept Wrangler steady. He wasn’t exactly thrilled, but he was a good boy!

In order to make sure he landed on his left side so Greg could reach the sarcoid that was on the right side, Chad and Steve took their positions on each side and guided him to the floor.

I shaved off the long, thick shaggy hair from his barrel around the sarcoid with my #10 blade and then Greg came back over the area with his closer cut blade. We put a fleece saddle pad under his head and covered his eyes with a bath towel.

Kim prepped the area while Steve held the rope that was anchored around his hind leg to prevent any kicking if he began to wake up. Chad held the IV drip while I watched his head for unnatural breath and movement. But Wrangler just snored!

Greg carefully removed the sarcoid paying attention to getting it all. Wrangler just kept snoring!

After the sarcoid was removed, we opted not to do stitches and Greg used his Hyper Thermic machine that would trigger his immune system to fight any cells that might have not been removed. It could even cause the old sarcoid that was now dormant to drop off later if it worked to that extent. This treatment is one that replaced the old injections that used to be the follow-up treatment in sarcoid surgeries.

Kim cleaned the area afterwards and blotted the sponge onto the area to help the blood to clot.

The she removed the IV drip system from the catheter in his neck. It wasn’t long after before Wrangler began to wake up.

We kept him on his sternum and patiently waited until he was ready to try to get up. At first, he was a bit wobbly and stayed in a sitting position for a few seconds before rising to all four legs.

Once he was on all fours, we held the sponges up against his belly to further stop the blood until it could lot. Wrangler just “hung loose!”

When the blood finally clotted, we pulled the IV needle from his neck and then held sponges on that until it stopped bleeding. Wrangler was grateful to be awake again…well, sort of awake!

When he was showing some stability on his feet, we took a few circles around the room to get his circulation going again. We kept him walking intermittently around the room for about 30 minutes before putting him back in his stall and run. We removed all the bedding for a few days so it would not get stuck in the open wound that we would clean twice a day and treat once a day with Panalog until it is healed.

Wrangler didn’t have the where-with-all to be able to let out a full-fledged bray, but he did let out several grunts of appreciation to Dr. Greg as he left!

 

The major corporations behind the wild horses and burros crisis

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Recently, AWHC Communications Director Grace Kuhn was on a television segment for TBS’ Full Frontal with Samantha Bee to talk about how billion-dollar corporations are major players in public lands livestock grazing …all at the expense of the American taxpayer and wild horses.

That’s right: Giant corporations actually represent the 20 largest grazing permit holders on public lands. This industry is consistently lobbying to round up and stockpile wild horses and burros so more of their livestock can graze at below market rates, thanks to tax subsidies.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t stop at ranching either. Simplot Livestock, which operates the taxpayer-funded Bruneau wild horse holding corrals in Idaho, is operated by J.R. Simplot Company, the extended family of J.R. Simplot, who until his death in 2008 was one of Forbes’  four hundred richest Americans.

It’s outrageous, and we’re grateful to Sam and her whole team for having us on to talk about this important issue. This would not have been possible without you! Will you make a contribution so we can double down on our efforts and continue getting our message out to as many folks as possible?

DONATE →

In order to create public education campaigns and continue our essential work in the field, we rely almost entirely on contributions from folks like you who know the importance of protecting our wild horses and burros.

With who we’re going up against — the powerful livestock lobby — your support is always needed!

Our investigations team is continuing to dig into this program and its players, and we hope to bring to light how wild horses and burros are being eradicated from Western public lands all in the name of profit.

But we’ll need you along with us to do this! Will you contribute now to fuel our efforts?

DONATE →

Thank you for your support!

The AWHC Investigations Team

Drivingthumbnail Copy

Longears Music Videos: Driving

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Tell your senators to protect wild horses before the FY23 deadline!!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Until the end of the month, the Senate Subcommittee on Appropriations is accepting requests from fellow senators on language they would like to see included in the Senate’s Fiscal Year 2023 spending bill. 

And at a time when the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is looking to expand its fertility control measures, securing funding dedicated to humane, in-the-wild management of our wild herds is more critical than ever: 

TELL YOUR SENATORS: PROTECT WILD HORSES

The BLM knows it needs to expand its fertility control efforts — and for the first time ever, the implementation of a robust fertility control vaccine program is being mandated by Congress. But instead of using humane fertility control vaccines to keep horses in the wild where they belong, the BLM continues to prioritize brutal — and often deadly — helicopter roundups instead.

History was made when Congress passed its FY22 omnibus spending bill that required the BLM to spend up to $11 million to implement a robust fertility control vaccine program as a humane alternative to cruel helicopter roundups. Now, we’re calling for the same language to be included in the FY23 spending bill to increase pressure on the BLM to shift toward this humane alternative to roundups!

We need your help. Will you contact your senators right now calling for humane management in the FY23 spending bill?

TAKE ACTION →

Thanks for your help, Meredith!

— AWHC Team

The rich history of our beloved burros

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

 

TrailRidingCheleyretreat8 17 2010 372CC

MULE CROSSING: Hauling Long Distances

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By Meredith Hodges

Hauling long distances needn’t be a problem with your Longears, if you use a little common sense and consideration. Their natural durability and good sense make them basically easier to haul than horses. When hauling for more than four or five hours, there are a few things to consider.

First, you should be sure that the trailer in which they are to ride affords safety and comfort. Before you leave, you should check over your trailer thoroughly. Make sure the hitch is secure and in good repair, and that there are no weakened welds anywhere. Check your trailer’s tires, bearings, axels and brakes for maximum performance, and make sure all the lights are in working order. Take the trailer mats out and check the floor boards for rot and other weaknesses, and replace any boards that are even questionable.

Using bedding such as shavings or straw in the trailer may afford a little extra comfort, and can encourage urination on the trip, but it isn’t always the best thing to do. The wind can cause the bedding to fly around inside the trailer, causing irritation to your animal’s eyes, ears and respiratory tract, particularly if you use shavings. If you wish to use bedding, straw is the better choice. In addition to the straw bedding, choose thicker trailer mats (rather than those that are thin) for your trailer. Thicker mats allow for more absorption of trailer vibration, as well as dispersing the moisture from urination. The trailer you use should give each animal ample space in which to stand. If your mules and donkeys are crowded in too tightly, they will be tense and anxious throughout the trip and will tire easily. This can result in battles between animals, increasing the potential for injury.


Mules and donkeys, like horses, should be “dressed” for their trip. For their overall comfort during long trips, halters should be fleeced, at least over the noseband, to protect from excessive rubbing that can result from being tied. Shipping wraps for their legs are also advisable to prevent injuries from a loss of balance, misstep or kick from another animal in the trailer. Depending on the weather and the kind of trailer you have (either a stock trailer or enclosed trailer) you can use sheets or blankets to protect the rest of your animal’s body.

Donkeys tend to sit back on whatever is behind them while they ride, so they should always wear an oversized sheet or blanket that drops down behind the rump to prevent chafing. If they are not protected in this way, they can develop terrible raw spots on their tails and hindquarters. Using a tail wrap on mules and donkeys is rarely successful, as these tend to slide off (even if they are taped). If they are put on too tightly, they can cut off the circulation in the tail and cause problems.

When loading your mules and donkeys, pay special attention to each individual’s needs. Animals that lean one way or the other generally do better in a slant load trailer rather than in an in-line trailer, but if you must use an in-line trailer, make sure that the animal that leans has a solid wall or partition on the side to which he leans. You always want to put animals next to each other that get along well, so if you must load a leaner on the wrong side, be sure to put him next to an animal that is able to tolerate his leaning without retaliating if there are no partitions. If you have an open stock trailer, another alternative is to load your animals into the trailer and tie them facing backwards. Many equines actually prefer to ride facing backwards because they find it easier to balance. Note: This alternative is not advisable in a partitioned in-line or slant-load trailer.

Once on the road, try to keep your equines’ routine as close to their “at home” routine as possible. Keeping grass hay in front of them will help to alleviate some of the stress of the trip, and will encourage them to relax and accept the situation. Feeds such as grain and alfalfa hay should be avoided, since these highly mobilize the intestines and can cause contractions that can lead to colic, particularly if your animals are not drinking enough water along the way. They should at least be offered some water (whether they drink it or not) at every stop you make along the way and ideally, once every two to three hours. Note: Water that your mules and donkeys are not used to may smell or taste strange to them and can be flavored with something they like. For instance, my donkey jack, Little Jack Horner, has a preference for iced tea to flavor unappetizing water on the road. Lightly flavoring your equines’ water may encourage them to continue to eat and drink throughout the trip, and will help keep them happy and healthy.

If your trailer is large and has good suspension, your mules and donkeys can ride for as long as twelve to fourteen hours without too much discomfort, provided that you make frequent fifteen-to-twenty-minute stops every two to three hours along the journey. This should not interrupt your travel schedule, as you will already be stopping for gas along the way. If your animals are riding in a smaller trailer with more vibration, it is advisable to stop, unload and walk your animals every four to six hours, in order to give them time to stretch, relax and rest their legs. If you have a difficult animal, loading him last is often easiest, since he won’t want to be left behind and will be more likely to follow the other animals into the trailer. This can be inconvenient if you have any animals that are difficult to load because of the extra time involved, but it is always a good opportunity to train them to get in and out of the trailer simply by repetition. By the end of a long trip, they will be loading and unloading much more easily. Just make sure that, if you have equines that are difficult to load, you have allotted yourself enough travel time to include this kind of training.

Long before you actually go anywhere, get your animals used to being handled inside the trailer. When unloading, always make them stand and wait. I usually remove my animals’ shipping wraps before I let them come out of the trailer, but if they are packed in pretty tightly, I just remove the leg wraps I can reach. The removal of leg wraps before unloading adds purpose to your Longears’ waiting time (which they quickly come to understand). Frequently offering water at stops gets your animals used to you moving about the trailer while they are loaded. Most equines realize that all of this is for their benefit and you should find them mostly cooperative and appreciative.

There are times when weather can change drastically and depending on what the weather and temperatures are doing, your animals may need sheets or blankets either put on or removed. When you teach your animals to stand quietly while you climb around inside the trailer ahead of time, putting on leg wraps or taking them off should help them feel more relaxed and accepting of the whole situation.

When loading or unloading your animals, you must always be very careful not to move too quickly or abruptly, which could possibly startle them and even get you trapped. But if you do have an emergency to attend to en route and your animals have been trained in the manner described above, you should be able to get to the animal in trouble with minimal problems. It sometimes takes a little more patience to get horses to stand quietly in the trailer. Once they realize that you are truly concerned with their best interests, mules and donkeys (intelligent creatures that they are), will usually be very cooperative and your long hauls can become relaxing and enjoyable road trips.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

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Obstacles For Coordination 4 14 20 26

CHASITY’S CHALLENGES: Obstacles for Coordination: 4-14-20

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4-14-20

After doing her Hourglass Pattern exercises, first one way and then the other, we opted to add some variety to the workout by adding some straight forward obstacles. In our indoor arena, I have an open space of 60’ X 120’ and a 45’ round pen at the end of the arena in another 60’ X 60’ fenced off space. Around the outside perimeter of the round pen in that area, I put my obstacles. I have found that there is less margin of error learning obstacles in a confined space to add coordination to their core strength in good equine posture. They can learn to pay more attention and to be more meticulous in their execution of the obstacles. This is a helpful way to begin with obstacles. The first obstacle for Chasity was the gate!

After going through the gate and standing stock still while I latched it, we proceeded to the bridge. I was pleasantly surprised when she allowed me to stop her with only her front feet on the bridge. This is generally a Stage Two move in my program since obstacles are used for coordination. Most equines are so uncoordinated that they just want to keep walking over and through the obstacles without stopping at first. Good for Chasity!

Chasity then carefully walked up onto the bridge with all four feet and halted on command! This was going much better than I had expected!

When I asked her to square up, she got a bit skewed to the side on the bridge, but she was nevertheless squared up, just not in line with the bridge. So I took it and rewarded her effort.We can do better the next time.

Then we got off the bridge and I squared her up again. Then…I introduced her to the tractor tire.

She looked at it…wasn’t afraid of it…walked around it…

…and looked at it again. She was clearly NOT going to put her foot in the middle of that tire! I decided to quit while we were ahead and try again next time. Because I didn’t push her, she consented to walking through the smaller tires…

…tentatively, but she did it! And then she walked around the barrels with no trouble at all!

Just having Chasity navigate these obstacles without being afraid of them was a major accomplishment. We then walked into the back-through “L” and I decided to make it a little bit tougher.

After walking through the “L” forward, I asked Chasity to back through where she had come.

She was a bit perplexed, but slowly backed between the rails, made the turn at the elbow, and went straight back from there with very little forcible encouragement.

Once at the end of the back-through “L,” we headed for the tarp. She followed me obediently, but was so silly…

When we got to the tarp, she wanted to walk EXACTLY where I walked! I guess she KNEW it was safe there! Too funny!

I gave her a reward because she really didn’t balk and we proceeded out of the obstacle area.

As we left, we executed the gate correctly and she was rewarded again. She stood quietly until I was ready to move.

Then we proceeded down the arena wall towards the exit gate and stopped to turn off the lights. She was a little surprised that the wall opened up, but stood still while I opened the door and turned off the lights.

Then I closed the door and we exited the arena. Adding obstacles and simple expectations to her regular work in the Hourglass Pattern made the experience more interesting and engaging to Chasity. When you add new things to their lessons, you shouldn’t feel like the equine has to do it right the first time. Just quit while you are ahead and your equine WILL do better the next time! There is no battle to remember!

Beginning by negotiating obstacles in larger areas makes for a larger margin for error. Too many things can go wrong and lead to an unpleasant chain of negative events that suck you and your equine into unnecessary altercations. There is plenty of time to do them in the more open spaces once they have learned how to negotiate them in the smaller spaces. I first school green animals during ground driving and under saddle in the small open area of my indoor arena (60’ X 120” – Standard Small Dressage Arena Size) before I take them into the larger outside arenas. This has resulted in a decrease of bolting and running. When you set up your training environment, it is always optimal to set up the equine for success!

TT 62

LTR Training Tip #62: Ground Driving Straight Forward Obstacles

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Ground driving your equine through the straight forward obstacles is a process of turning fear into curiosity, then finesse, coordination, competence and, finally, confidence.

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The BLM has set its sights on the Wyoming Checkerboard Wild Horses

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) just finalized plans to eliminate more than one million acres of habitat and most of the federally-protected wild horses in the Wyoming Checkerboard.

This would be the largest eradication of these iconic animals from western public lands ever. The plan calls for the removal of every single horse from the Salt Wells Creek and Great Divide Basin Herd Management Areas (HMAs) and the drastic reduction of the Adobe Town HMA mustang population.

Our team here at AWHC have been involved in litigation to protect this iconic herd for over a decade – and we don’t plan on stopping now. Can you make a donation right now to help us prepare for the legal fight ahead to protect these wild horses and their habitat?

DONATE →

As a precursor to the eradication plan, the BLM conducted the largest wild horse roundup in agency history in the Wyoming Checkerboard, capturing over 4,000 wild horses and permanently removing 3,502 from their habitat. 

The BLM says that 37 wild horses were killed as a result of the roundup, but records we obtained through the Freedom of Information Act indicate the death toll in the weeks and months after the roundup was actually higher.

Most of the horses who were lucky to survive have been crammed into the Wheatland Off-Range Corrals, a facility currently experiencing a large-scale outbreak of a highly contagious infectious disease known as strangles. The disease has killed 11 horses so far.

These wild horses do no harm where they belong — in the wild, but our government is placing them in harm’s way by subjecting them to brutal helicopter roundups and cramming them into crowded, dangerous holding facilities.

Our team is leading the charge to end the cruel and harmful practice of helicopter roundups and move the BLM toward true humane protection for our wild horse populations on our public lands. Will you make a contribution today so we can continue our fight to protect the wild horses of the Wyoming Checkerboard and across the West?

DONATE →

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

ACT NOW: BLM targets the ONLY designated wild burro range in the west!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking public input for a proposed roundup of the historic wild burros of the Marietta Wild Burro Range in Mineral County, Nevada.

The Marietta Wild Burro Range was publicly dedicated by the BLM Director in 1991 for the 20th anniversary of passage of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. Marietta is the BLM’s only wild burro range, and means that the area will be “principally” managed for the animals.

The Range is home to an estimated 400-500 burros. However, the agency set an unscientifically low appropriate management level (AML) of just 78-104 wild burros on the 68,000-acre range, threatening the genetic viability of the herd.

These burros need your voice NOW. Will you speak up for the Marietta Range wild burros right away by submitting comments to the BLM in strong opposition to this proposed plan?

BE THEIR VOICE →

The agency’s current proposed action is to round up and remove most of the Marietta Range burros. This means that if the plan goes through, the BLM will put hundreds of these animals at risk of serious injury and death through its brutal and inhumane helicopter roundups.

Further, the BLM is ignoring recent scientific evidence that shows that wild burros dig wells in their environments, actually boosting the availability of water in desert landscapes across the American Southwest!

We can’t allow the BLM to endanger the lives of these wild burros, Meredith. If you oppose this disastrous plan, speak up and submit your comments to the BLM now!

TAKE ACTION →

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

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