Monthly Archive for: ‘August, 2022’

ICYMI: Recapping the largest roundup in Colorado history >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We wanted to share a recap of the largest roundup in Colorado history in the Piceance Basin, a call to action to help us put an end to brutal helicopter roundups, and a preview of what herds are in the Burea of Land Management’s (BLM) sights in September. Read on to learn more and take action to help us protect our cherished wild herds. >>

Tell Your Representative: Cosponsor H.R.6635 to Stop Helicopter Roundups!

This summer’s brutal helicopter roundups claimed the lives of more than 60 wild horses and burros, and hundreds more are on the line.

New roundups slated to start in September, have been announced in Oregon, Utah and Nevada. Now is the time to encourage our members of Congress to act by supporting H.R. 6635, the Wild Horse and Burro Protection Act which would ban the use of helicopters for wild horse and burro removals.

TAKE ACTION

After the Roundup: A Look Back at Piceance Basin

Earlier this summer, the BLM conducted the largest roundup in Colorado history in the Piceance-East Douglas Herd Management Area near Meeker.

In our latest blog, we take you through the controversial situation from start to finish – from the announcement that led to the Governor’s intervention, to the scientific ecology report that debunked the BLM’s assertions about the land and horses, to the roundup itself where 867 wild horses lost their freedom and ultimately to the agency’s goal of never having a helicopter enter the Basin again. Click below for the full story.

READ MORE

More Roundups Are Coming: A Glance at September

As the roundups that began in July wind down, we want to give you a look at what herds are next on the chopping block for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service. Read more at the blog by clicking below.

READ MORE

Thank you for continuing to stand with our wild horses and burros, Meredith!

— AWHC Team

 

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MULE CROSSING: Imprinting Beyond Birth

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By Meredith Hodges

Imprinting is defined as “rapid learning that occurs during a brief receptive period, typically soon after birth or hatching, and establishes a long-lasting behavioral response to a person or object as attachment to a parent or offspring.” 1 When we speak of “imprinting” in the scientific sense, it is a reference to the way the brain accepts input. The brain compartmentalizes impressions and images, and the animal reacts to the stimulus that the image produces. A collection of “imprints and images” produces memories. Imprinting training with a foal of any breed will give him a jump-start on his life with human beings.

Imprinting is more than getting your foal used to people. He’s going to spend the rest of his life with human beings, so he should get used to your touch, your voice, your smell and, especially, your handling of him. Handling your foal the minute he is born is a wonderful way to bond with him, and you will learn how he likes to be touched in order to produce a positive response. This early imprinting lays a foundation of trust for the training to follow.

Although it is commonly accepted that initial imprinting on the foal’s brain occurs only during a brief receptive period when initial contact is made during the first few days of life, it does provide a foundation on which to expand exposure to a human being through your foal’s five senses of touch, taste, smell, hearing and sight that leave impressions on the equine brain and will affect the way he interacts with a handler beyond what his dam may teach him. If the initial contact with humans leaves a positive impression, a foal will be more likely to be curious about humans than afraid of them. Because of this early contact, continuing imprinting then becomes an ongoing process that builds on the initial imprinting that is introduced at birth.

A calm, well-mannered mother helps produce a well-mannered foal, so if your mare or jennet is not easy to handle, she needs imprint training before the foal is born. Mares, and particularly jennets, can become very aggressive in defense of their offspring, so it is advisable to imprint even a mature mare or jennet so she will be safe to be around when she finally foals.

When imprinting your foal, think about the kind of adult you want him to be. A foal is very similar to a human baby regarding emotional needs—both need attention, love, guidance and praise to become loving, cooperative adults. Start your relationship with a positive attitude and approach your foal with love, patience, kindness and respect. Be sure to set reasonable boundaries for his behavior through the way you touch him and speak to him, the facial expressions you use, and even how you smell when you are around him so he can learn to trust and respect you and be happy at the sight of you.

It doesn’t matter if your equine is a young foal or an older animal—he needs imprint training. It will set the stage for the way he relates to humans for the rest of his life. Imprinting stimulates all of his five senses: touch, hearing, taste, smell and sight. This leaves an indelible impression on your equine’s brain as to how you expect him to behave, which—over time and with repetition—becomes his new natural way of responding.

The most important sensation to which you can expose your equine is touch. If your touch is gentle and considerate, it will feel good to him and he will be interested in your attention. When you run your fingers over his body, being careful not to press too hard on sensitive areas, he will experience pleasure and begin to look forward to your visits. Learning how your equine likes to be touched will also help things go more smoothly when you begin grooming him and tacking him up and during his training lessons, when he must learn to take his cues from your hands, legs and other aids. Even how you mount and sit down in the saddle—for instance, how your seat is placed on his back—denotes your consideration of him through touch. The wrong kind of touch, no matter how slight, can be a trigger for adverse behaviors. However, the right kind of touch—done correctly—produces pleasure in your equine and instills a willingness to perform in a positive way each time you interact with him.

To begin imprinting training, run your hands all over your equine’s body and down his legs, and put your hands in his mouth and in his ears. His reactions will help you learn how he likes to be touched. Getting your equine used to touch in this way eventually evolves into exposing him to grooming and working with tack and equipment. You are continuing to build on the initial imprinting work, but now, when you are grooming, the grooming tools will become extensions of your hands, and when you introduce various tack and equipment like clippers, they will also become an extension of your hands. Allow your equine to use his sense of touch (usually with his nose) when introducing any new object. Work toward getting your equine’s response to your touch as highly sensitive as possible, so that he can use his own body language to communicate with you. NOTE: Many owners pat their equine on the top of the head with the flat of their hand as a sign of affection, without realizing that, as a rule, most equines don’t take kindly to people patting their foreheads or faces. A pat on the forehead works if you want to distract your equine, but save it for that purpose only. It is much better to show affection by stroking your equine (always in the direction in which his hair lies), in a soothing and reassuring manner.

The tone of your voice is another important element of imprinting. If your general tone is soothing and encouraging, he is more likely to comply. Then, when he needs to be disciplined, the change in your tone of voice will convey your disapproval before you even have to touch him to make a correction—giving him the opportunity to straighten up before you actually need to apply the physical backup of negative reinforcement. If, no matter what the situation, you always speak in low tones, he will not be able to differentiate between what’s acceptable and what is not, but if you modulate your voice to clearly express what you want to convey, your equine will be much better able to understand and react appropriately.

Equines have an excellent sense of smell—for instance, they can smell danger from miles away. They can also smell people, and they are much more likely to warm up to a person who smells “good” to them. Smelling good to an equine has nothing to do with soaps or perfumes or deodorants. Oats and hay are smells that all equines immediately recognize and love, so if you dole out oats rewards correctly and you actively participate in the feeding and care of your equine, you will mostly smell like crimped oats throughout lessons, making you VERY attractive to your equine!

The next sense to which you should appeal is your equine’s sense of taste (a no-brainer). When you dispense the oats reward for all of his new positive behaviors, he associates that wonderful taste with you and will follow you to the ends of the earth to get more oats.

When the equine’s five senses are truly pleased, the very sight of you will prompt the memories and impressions on his brain that you have instilled in him during imprinting. The impression you have left with him is positive, encouraging, kind, considerate and respectful, and his reactions to you will also be positive and willing.

As you begin your equine’s imprinting, make sure you include an equal measure of fun. As with children, if you make learning fun, it comes more easily. By encouraging your young foal or older equine’s enthusiasm for learning, you’ll cultivate and enhance your equine’s desire to please and to serve.

Imprinting training is truly an ongoing learning experience. When touching a newborn foal, keep in mind that the foal is coming out of the protected environment of the womb, where he’s had pressure from the amniotic fluid over his entire body. Suddenly, he’s born into an entirely foreign environment and, soon after, a human appears out of nowhere and begins touching him. Initially, this is like being tickled all over, so at this point, imprinting serves as a desensitization technique to human touch. Desensitization doesn’t mean you want your equine to become totally desensitized to you—just that you don’t want him to jump out of his skin every time you touch him. Always strive for a positive interaction between you and your equine.

Pay attention to the way your equine’s hair lays and stroke his coat in that direction only. There is more fatty tissue down the neck and over the back, so you can press a little harder when touching these areas. Going with the hair and using the flat of your hand, learn to gauge how much pressure you can apply to the fatty areas. Then, as you work your way down to where the fatty tissue becomes thinner, be sure to ease up on the pressure over the bony areas.

Always keep an eye on your equine and watch his face—he’ll let you know if he is experiencing pleasure or displeasure. If you observe wrinkling around his mouth, if his ears are laid back flat or if he stomps a foot, he is showing displeasure. A soft eye, a relaxed, contentedly chewing mouth and an absence of tension in his body denotes pleasure. So when you are engaged in training, pay special attention to your equine’s body language and adjust your own touch accordingly.

Work on evolving your own body language as a natural and truly wonderful way to “talk” with your equine. You can also use verbal language, but body language should be your primary form of communication.

Making use of your equine’s five senses to expand the meaning and benefit of imprinting can really work in your favor and will leave an indelible impression on your equine’s brain that will engage his attention and expedite the learning process. The result will be a deep and meaningful relationship with your equine not just now, but for the rest of his life.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2013, 2016, 2020, 2021, 2022 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Chasity’s Farrier Visit 5 22 20 6

CHASITY’S CHALLENGES: Chasity’s Farrier Visit: 5-22-20

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5-22-20

When Chasity first arrived, her hooves were inordinately long in front with Borium shoes and her back feet were worn unevenly and at the wrong angles. Because her body was in such bad posture and her hooves so out of balance, we knew it would take quite a while and lots of frequent trims to get her hooves balanced and aligned properly. This would have to be done in conjunction with getting her body into good posture with the core strength to support that good equine posture. This would be Chasity’s  challenges!

Chasity is now standing quietly and picking up her feet easily, but she still wasn’t sure about standing still without being tied up. A small challenge for her would be to learn to stand quietly in the alleyway of the barn while our farrier, Dean Geesen works on her instead of being at her work station in the Tack Barn. Because she stood still, she was rewarded with her favorite crimped oats. The misshapen hoof is beginning to rotate into a more balanced position, but we still have a lot of work ahead before the hoof will be correct.

Dean is a therapeutic corrective farrier that is familiar with Longears. This is a critical element in your Longears’ welfare. Longears have angles and hoof construction that is quite different from a horse and it takes a knowledgeable farrier to keep from doing them harm. Chasity feels the difference in the balance of her feet, however slight, and it affects her whole body!

Chasity’s hind feet appear as if they have been done like a farrier would do a horse. Her rear hooves are not as upright as they should be with insufficient heels. Dean leaves the heels, rasps the front feet and rolls the toes a bit to promote more proper action and healthy growth. As long as I have had donkeys, I have never had to put shoes on them. It is my experience that when they are in good postural balance in their body, they generally wear their feet evenly and vice versa. When fed properly, the hooves remain hard and balanced. They don’t even need to be trimmed all that often if they are not consistently standing on soft ground, or in mud. We use pea gravel in our runs and driveways. In the runs, we put about four inches down. It drains well, is hard enough to promote hard hooves, is rounded and does not chip the feet and is soft enough for the equines to lie down comfortably.

Chasity is tolerates yielding her back feet much better after having a chiropractic adjustment in her pelvis and hip joints yesterday. This is a dramatic beginning for her toward MUCH better balance and posture. She had to be a very sore and uncomfortable animal when she first arrived. She is now feeling some relief and is much more cooperative.

The front hoof on the opposite side reveals the compromised imbalance that she had when she came to us. However, the first trim put her on the road to recovery and her feet are beginning to grow in the correct direction. She has gained a lot more heel in the rear in the past eight weeks.

Chasity has learned to be sent into her stall and then to turn and square up for her reward! Her gait has improved substantially in the past two days with chiropractic work and another trim!


Wild horses need our voice in the courtroom

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

It’s no secret that our cherished wild horses and burros are safest in the wild, where they are kept away from brutal helicopter roundups and out of disease-ridden holding facilities.

But thanks to the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) relentless campaign to slash wild horse and burro populations to near-extinction levels, these innocent wild equines are being deprived of their right to live free on western public lands where they belong.

Here at the American Wild Horse Campaign (AWHC), we’re fighting to keep wild horses and burros wild through every avenue possible — including in federal court. 

These wild animals cannot defend themselves in our legal system. That’s why we are dedicated to being their voice in the court of law. And, when we sue, we win.

When we first heard that the BLM’s Adoption Incentive Program (AIP) was sending adopted horses and burros into the slaughter pipeline, our investigative and legal teams lept into action and filed dozens of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to obtain the concrete evidence needed to expose the program.

We even had to take the BLM to court to force it to hand over many of these records. Without doing so, we would have not been able to put the many puzzle pieces together and prove once and for all that the AIP is funneling wild mustangs and burros right into the hands of kill buyers.

Not only that, AWHC is still in court battling the BLM and the Department of Interior (DOI) against the government’s alleged illegal implementation of the AIP. Can you make a donation today to fuel our legal efforts? We need your support to power our Legal Fund and keep up the pressure on the BLM and DOI.

Our latest investigative report revealed that in less than two years, at least 840 federally-protected wild horses and burros ended up in the slaughter pipeline. Of the animals we obtained brand information for, 73% were confirmed to be adopted via the AIP and dozens were adopted by groups of related individuals, scheming to make a quick buck off our beloved wild horses and burros.

If it weren’t for the work of our investigative and legal teams, none of this would have been brought to light. Please chip in a contribution now to support our Legal Fund and help us continue to fight for these innocent animals in the courtroom!

FUEL OUR LEGAL EFFORTS

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

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Longears Music Videos: Mules and Cattle

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An ooops, and a PS.

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

All About Equine Animal Rescue, Inc.

Thank you for all of the concerned messages about the bad link for Ell. 

It’s so nice to know so many people want to help!!

Here is a new link you can use!

We are so grateful for everyone’s support so far!

Donate for Ell!

Don’t forgot to leave a note in the special instructions box that your gift is for Ell!

About Ell: Ell is a young, captive bred/born mustang, only about 18 months old. Ell has an entire life ahead. With everyone’s help, we can make sure Ell has the best chance at a pain free life. Initial surgery and care costs (e.g. hospitalization, diagnostics, meds, vaccines, exams, etc.) are in the $2500 to $3000 range, barring any complications. If another surgery is needed, we’ll keep you updated and revisit funding, if necessary. 

Surgery is scheduled September 6, 2022, after Ell finishes a round of antibiotics.

 Can you help Ell? This sweet lil’ mustang deserves it! 

 There are so many horses in need right now, if we can all do a little to help the ones we can, together, we will all be able to make a difference for that many more.

This video has a few new clips than the one in our original email so be sure to watch.

Meet Our Newest Herd Member-in-Need!

Ellie recently arrived at AAE after a local family reached out for help. They “rescued” young Ell when they got “the ugly colt” for free from a backyard breeder. They were told he needed “a little” cosmetic surgery. They felt really bad for the skinny little guy and wanted to get him out of there. Sadly, the breeder didn’t take responsibility for the “little” issue and passed it on to the unsuspecting family. They really wanted to help.

After meeting with two different vets right away and trying to help Ell, they realized this was more than a “little” surgery. There was concern Ell might be a hermaphrodite, and it could be more complicated than cosmetic. After several months of trying to meet Ell’s needs, they realized it was more than they could manage. They wanted the best chance for Ell and reached out to AAE for help.

You see, Ell was born with a congenital abnormality – Ell has a sheath, but it appears he doesn’t have a penis (though, there’s a chance it’s stuck inside him or it’s not where it belongs). For now, we assume Ell is a colt, but missing his part. We’re waiting for updated blood results to check testosterone levels. Could there be hidden testicles, too?

Ell is able to pass urine, but big surprise, without a penis, Ell can’t urinate normally. Urine dribbles from his sheath almost continuously. Sadly, the urine scalds Ell’s skin around his sheath, down his belly, and down his legs. Poor little thing, it’s so painful. Though we do what we can to minimize the scalding, it’s painful being treated, too.

Ell needs surgery to remove some of his sheath to allow urine to flow freely. Depending on blood results, a second surgery may be in store. For now, we’ll focus on fixing the sheath.

All things considered, Ell is the sweetest little thing. That said, Ell has some strong opinions about things and wasn’t very good with hoof handling. Considering sheath cleanings and scalding, it’s understandable. He’s learning to give his hooves, and we’re working on the basics, too, like trimming his hooves, vaccines, and a change in diet to help him put on a little weight. Ell’s already come a long way in a short time at AAE. Let’s give him a chance!

If you’re able to help Ell have a better life, please make a donation toward his surgery and care costs on his behalf.

Donate for Ell!

With Your Support,

Make More Second Chances Like These

Say hello to young Ell!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

All About Equine Animal Rescue, Inc.

Meet Our Newest Herd Member-in-Need!

Ellie recently arrived at AAE after a local family reached out for help. They “rescued” young Ell when they got “the ugly colt” for free from a backyard breeder. They were told he needed “a little” cosmetic surgery. They felt really bad for the skinny little guy and wanted to get him out of there. Sadly, the breeder didn’t take responsibility for the “little” issue and passed it on to the unsuspecting family. They really wanted to help.

After meeting with two different vets right away and trying to help Ell, they realized this was more than a “little” surgery. There was concern Ell might be a hermaphrodite, and it could be more complicated than cosmetic. After several months of trying to meet Ell’s needs, they realized it was more than they could manage. They wanted the best chance for Ell and reached out to AAE for help.

You see, Ell was born with a congenital abnormality – Ell has a sheath, but it appears he doesn’t have a penis (though, there’s a chance it’s stuck inside him or it’s not where it belongs). For now, we assume Ell is a colt, but missing his part. We’re waiting for updated blood results to check testosterone levels. Could there be hidden testicles, too?

Ell is able to pass urine, but big surprise, without a penis, Ell can’t urinate normally. Urine dribbles from his sheath almost continuously. Sadly, the urine scalds Ell’s skin around his sheath, down his belly, and down his legs. Poor little thing, it’s so painful. Though we do what we can to minimize the scalding, it’s painful being treated, too.

Ell needs surgery to remove some of his sheath to allow urine to flow freely. Depending on blood results, a second surgery may be in store. For now, we’ll focus on fixing the sheath.

All things considered, Ell is the sweetest little thing. That said, Ell has some strong opinions about things and wasn’t very good with hoof handling. Considering sheath cleanings and scalding, it’s understandable. He’s learning to give his hooves, and we’re working on the basics, too, like trimming his hooves, vaccines, and a change in diet to help him put on a little weight. Ell’s already come a long way in a short time at AAE. Let’s give him a chance!

If you’re able to help Ell have a better life, please make a donation toward his surgery and care costs on his behalf.

Donate for Ell!

With Your Support,

Make More Second Chances Like These

Thank you to our 2022 Boots & Bling Sponsors!

Chilly Pepper – Heartbreak and another 911 – Will you help save Smokey?

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

My Heart is Crushed – I couldn’t save Angel.

Yesterday was too much. I saw “Angel” who was another “DUMPED HORSE”. Starved, abused and thrown away to die a horrible death, alone and wondering what he did wrong . My contact went out to see if we could save Angel, but someone had already ended his suffering. What a HORRIBLE way to die, alone and thrown out. My heart is shattered into a billion pieces.

_MEANWHILE – Another urgent 911

Smokey was neglected, abused and starved. Who throws away a horse, LOOSE, on a MAJOR HIGHWAY?

Smokey was literally running down the middle of Hwy 97.

God timed it perfectly for Matt to arrive on scene and catch the horse, tie it to the State Trooper’s bumper and head back to get a trailer to pick him up.

The proper authorities were contacted. (It is ILLEGAL to take a horse off the reservation without permission) and he is now at Chilly Pepper.

Doc is heading out today. SMOKEY NEEDS YOUR HELP NOW!

We NEED more Hay, Grain and Supplements for these precious animals.

I know everyone is tired of the 911’s and emergencies. So am I! But they are not my emergencies. They belong to the life of each and every horse you help save!

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

ACT NOW: Demand camera installations on BLM helicopters!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

As you know from our last email, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has been on the attack against thousands of wild horses and burros across the West since this summer’s roundup season began. The BLM’s brutal helicopter roundups have caused the deaths of dozens of innocent equines just in the past month.

Thankfully, the American Wild Horse Campaign (AWHC) has had observers on the ground at each of these roundups to document the BLM’s wrongdoings, hold it accountable, and educate the public as to what’s happening to our federally protected wild horses and burros.

However, the BLM and its contractors who execute the helicopter stampedes have placed a number of restrictions on public observation, limiting the transparency at these traumatic roundups. We need to make sure that no BLM atrocity goes unrecorded. Will you call on the BLM to mandate camera installations on all helicopters used for roundups?

TAKE ACTION

These removal operations already take place in some of the most remote areas of the west and out of public view. By imposing these limitations on observers, the BLM is even further shrouding its cruel “management tactics” from the American people. For example, at the Blue Wing Complex roundup this summer, our team was placed over a mile away from the trap site and in spots where terrain blocked most of our view.

AWHC is fighting hard to put an end to these inhumane helicopter roundups. But until we can stop them for good, we need to hold the BLM accountable for ALL of its misdeeds against wild horses and burros.

That’s why we are calling on the BLM to require camera installations on all helicopters used for roundup operations. Will you join us and help ensure the BLM is held accountable for violations during its inhumane helicopter roundups?

TAKE ACTION

Thank you.

– AWHC

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MULE CROSSING: Fine-Tuning the Aids

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By Meredith Hodges

While doing the exercises in balance by riding without the aid of your reins as described in DVD #5, you probably discovered a lot more shifting of your own balance than you imagined. This nearly imperceptible shift of balance, however, can grossly affect the balance of your equine. Until now, I have always given the rider a visual point of reference by allowing you to glance down at the outside front leg. Now you will want to be more inwardly conscious of your own body position.

You need to repeat many of the previous exercises to cultivate this kind of sensitivity, but this time, close your eyes for brief periods of time to get the “feel” of each movement in your own body. Do not simply allow your equine to travel freely in any direction, because this will not give you an accurate feeling for any specific gait or task—you must plan your course of action. If, for instance, you set up your equine to bend through and come out of a corner with impulsion, you can close your eyes for a few seconds down the long side and feel the balance that comes out of that corner when the movement is executed correctly. In this particular situation, once you’ve closed your eyes, you may notice that your animal is starting to lean slightly to the inside. A squeeze/release from your inside leg, sending your mule forward and catching that balance with the outside rein, corrects the balance and keeps him going straight and erect down the long side.

Your seat bones are closest to your body’s center of gravity, making them the best sensors for balance. “Feel” the weight shift from one seat bone to the other through turns and circles, and then even out as you ride straight lines and diagonals. You will soon discover that, in order to do a circle in better balance, you must have slightly more weight on the outside seat bone and leg.

This situates your weight over the outside hind leg, which is the leg that initiates impulsion. Putting the weight over the outside hind leg clears the mule’s shoulders, allowing freer movement in front. If you ride on your inside seat bone, the weight begins to fall to the inside of the circle and puts pressure on the shoulder, inhibiting the upright, forward balance and this will put your animal on the forehand instead of engaging his hindquarters.

Remember to plan your course of action and use your half-halts between changes of direction and transitions from one gait to another. You cannot expect your equine to maintain his balance when he is constantly being surprised with changes of direction or gait. Look ahead (Do not look down!) and use your eyes correctly to enhance your balance and to help you more realistically plan your course. Teach yourself to be accurate with your eyes—look well ahead at all times and try to stay exactly on the lines and the arcs of your circles. When you plan a circle, look halfway around your circle so you can plan the arc more accurately, and then you can make the next half of the circle the same as the first half, in order to complete your circle with minimal trouble. Keep your eyes on a visual horizontal line that runs parallel to the ground. Remember—you have two eyes, and any movement as slight as a tip of your head to one side or the other can affect the upright balance of your equine. Dropping your eyes to the ground shifts your animal’s balance forward and onto his shoulders, again interrupting his balance.

Do small circles, but only as small as your equine can handle without losing his balance. Once he can easily maintain his balance without interruption, you can begin to decrease the size of the circles. Keep movements planned and large. This will give your equine plenty of response time through planned movements and will allow you to ride and correct the balance with more ease. If, for some reason, your animal loses his balance, falls out or rushes, stop him by using even pressure on both reins, with a squeeze/release action. Back him up slowly and deliberately, remembering to walk backward with your seat and legs, one step at a time, and then calmly go back and try to repeat the movement. If he makes the same mistake a second time, halt, back up and then walk through the area that is giving you the problem. Resume trotting or cantering when he complies. When you approach that area again, slow him down again, go through and resume your plan.

If he “ducks out” with you and begins to run, keep your connection on the rein that he has pulled as best as you can, and try to stop him by pulling on both reins together with a light squeeze/release action. Try to verbally calm him, and when he finally stops, let the reins go loose and praise him for stopping. Then, collect your reins again, turn him with the rein that he has just pulled out of your hand, and return him to the task. Do not try to pull him around with the other rein, because this will cause him to lose his balance and will frighten him even more. If he is praised for stopping, he will not be afraid to stop. If the reins remain tight and he’s punished for running, he may never want to stop.

The main goal is to cultivate an equine that is moving calmly between your two hands and your two legs and is responsive to changes in your aids—to your seat, to your legs and to your hands. If you keep your eyes focused well ahead and your hands and legs evenly balanced over your seat bones, you can strongly affect your animal’s vertical balance. Correct and repetitive use of the aids will eventually allow your equine to become lighter in the bridle and more responsive. In addition, his muscles will begin to be properly and symmetrically conditioned. An animal that is restrained and forced will develop muscles incorrectly. In turn, this will cause him stiffness through many movements. Most commonly, you see a slight “U” in the base of the neck in front of the withers. This is caused by stiffness in the poll from riding from front to back, rather than from back to front. Actually, the stiffness will transmit to other parts of the body and can cause chronic soreness as in the croup (hunter’s bump), but the most obvious signs show in the neck and poll. Incorrect development of the muscles will undoubtedly inhibit your equine’s best performance.

I ride my equines diagonally through the aids to get the best lateral and vertical response. I want to maintain a good forward movement, which means that the impulsion must come from the hindquarters and push forward. Think of your hands and legs as four corners of a box that contains your equine. If you push forward on one side at a time from, say, left leg to your left hand, it leaves the other whole side of the animal unchecked, and he will proceed forward with a tendency to drift into the “open” side. This is why you have to ride alternately and diagonally from the left leg to the right hand and from the right leg to the left hand. It is why you ride from back to front, leg to hand, in a diagonal fashion—it pushes your animal from the outside leg forward into a straight and balanced inside rein, and from the supportive inside leg to the outside rein—he remains upright on the arcs and sufficiently bent. The wider the space between your legs and between your hands, the more lateral “play” you will feel in your equine. If you keep your hands close together and your legs snugly around his barrel, there is a lot less lateral “play” and a great deal more accuracy when doing your patterns. Think of your legs and hands creating a “train track” with rails between which your animal must move. The wider the space between your hands and legs, the “snakier” his movements will become.

But what if he will not turn without you really pulling on the inside rein? He will turn if you do it correctly. Remember, it doesn’t matter how far you turn his head to the side. His head is not attached to the ground and he will only go where his legs go. You will be helpful to your mule and correct if you always try to keep his head and neck straight in front of his shoulders. When you wish to turn, give a slight half halt to slow for the turn. Be sure to support your equine with your legs as you do this—the inside leg should become stronger with each squeeze and give with each release. Keep your outside rein slightly checked back compared to your inside rein (which pulls and releases), and hold your hand in close to the withers on the outside. Do not check too hard or your equine will turn out instead of around the circle. Take your inside rein away from the withers a little to encourage the turn, but be careful not to take it any farther than necessary, because this will disconnect your animal’s hindquarters from his shoulders. As you repeatedly do this exercise, your equine will learn to lead with his shoulders, bend his body through his rib cage to the arc of the circle, and not just his head and neck. If necessary, you can counter bend his head and neck to move the shoulders onto the arc of the circle, but do not counter bend too much or you will get a turn instead. Hold his correct bend steady with your legs – the inside leg at the girth and the outside leg slightly back to encourage impulsion through the turn.

The finer you tune your own aids, the lighter and more responsive your equine will become. To summarize, before you begin, plan your course of action. Keep movements large and flowing, your eyes looking ahead and your aids even and close in. Employ the aids diagonally, while firmly encouraging forward energy horizontally from back to front while at the same time, encouraging vertical flexion over the topline. Do not be too concerned about where your equine’s nose is if his body movement is correct. As he becomes more confident, fit and relaxed, and as your aids become more correct, his head and neck will drop into the improved posture of their own accord. If you try to set the head and neck on the vertical before the body has been conditioned to balance and round, you will produce an animal with a hollow back and a lot of vertical and lateral stiffness. This will prevent him from correctly responding to your aids even if he wants to, because he will be physically unable to do so. It may take a little longer to correctly condition both your body and his, but the result is a sound, cooperative animal, possessing the mental and physical qualities necessary for the best performance upon your request. You may even experience the surprise of a better response to your aids and good posture, balance and strength in your own body, as well.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2016, 2017, 2022 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

This article is an excerpt from the book, Training Mules and Donkeys by Meredith Hodges, 2013.

 

 

Wild horses and burros are under attack like never before

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Over the past month, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has waged an unprecedented assault on wild horses and burros throughout the West. We’ve had observers onsite at the roundups to document the inhumanity of the BLM’s helicopter roundups – and what we’ve seen is utterly heartbreaking.

At least 64 innocent wild horses and burros have been killed in BLM helicopter roundups in California and Nevada. 31 of these deaths took place at the Twin Peaks Herd Management Area (HMA) alone, including 11 foalsSeveral of these foals died suddenly upon arriving at temporary holding centers while others later succumbed to injuries they sustained while trying to escape the helicopters or in the temporary holding pens.

Twin Peaks. Steve Paige/American Wild Horse Campaign

As if the deaths of these poor, innocent foals isn’t bad enough, the BLM also euthanized multiple horses between the ages of 20 and 30 years old simply due to their older ageSeveral of these horses were considered healthy, but were still put down citing “partial blindness.”

These deaths during the Twin Peaks roundup highlight just how cruel the BLM’s “management tactics” truly are. Sadly, we are seeing similarly egregious deaths at several other roundups as well.

  • At the Triple B Complex roundup, 20 wild horses have died so far – including 4 foals and two horses who suffered broken necks.
  • At the Blue Wing Complex roundup, 14 wild horses and burros died and over 1,000 were captured.
  • And at the Bible Springs Complex roundup (which is still ongoing), 224 wild horses have been captured so far resulting in at least one death.

Meredith, how many more of these precious animals must die before enough is enough? The BLM must be forced to change its practices, or more and more wild horses and burros will meet the same tragic fate. That’s why we refuse to give up until these cruel helicopter roundups end for good. We are fighting back every day – whether that’s in the courts, out on the field, or in the halls of Congress.

But we can’t win this fight without your support. Your generosity is what funds our humane observers at roundups, fuels our legal battles, and drives our advocacy efforts on Capitol Hill and in key western states. So please, stand with us in this fight to save the lives of America’s wild horses and burros and make helicopter roundups a thing of the past with a donation today. >>

DONATE

Thank you for helping us keep up the fight.

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director 
American Wild Horse Campaign

LUNGINGGROUND DRIVING8 4 20 11

WRANGLER’S DONKEY DIARY: MORE LUNGING & GROUND DRIVING: 8-4-20

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Wrangler is wondering why Augie and Spuds, the mini donkeys are here. He is usually worked with Chasity… just the two of them! Wrangler is big on being the center of attention and stands quietly while I put on his surcingle instead of his English saddle this time. He is sure something is up, but he doesn’t exactly know what it might be just yet!

Wrangler and Chasity are now getting REALLY GOOD at being led together and stay in sync with my steps. They negotiate the gate easily and obediently. This is how well things can go when you are clear and consistent about the way that you do things. The animals then know what to expect and can comply without anxiety.

I led Augie and Spuds to the Round Pen and tied them up outside so they could watch Wrangler and Chasity while they were lunging. I thought maybe I would be able to lunge all four of them together if things went well. When they have someone to watch, my animals learn to stand still when tied. They know it will soon be their turn.

Wrangler immediately noticed the mini donkeys and wondered why they were there, but when asked, I regained his attention to business. Chasity walked off to practice while I adjusted Wrangler’s “Elbow Pull.”

Wrangler stood quietly while I made some adjustments and asked him to flex at his poll to make sure it was not too restrictive. Then I sent him to thr rail for lunging. He went quietly forward in a nice working walk.

When asked, Wrangler and Chasity moved into a smart working trot. Chasity is getting better with her posture and will soon be able to keep the “Elbow Pull” loose throughout the entire workout like Wrangler does. It takes time to develop that kind of core strength in good balance!

I added the drive lines to Wrangler after successful lunging while Chasity stood by and watched. He was a bit hard to turn in his last lessons, but this time his turns were much improved. He stayed very light in my hands and moved at the touch of a finger. I made sure to use the verbal commands “Gee” (go right) and “Haw” (go left). It makes a huge difference!

Wrangler stayed calm as we walked around the Round Pen doing an occasional “S” turn through the middle to change directions.

Wrangler was much improved from his last lesson! I don’t “drill” them until they get it right. That would just make them tired and cranky…then they do not learn. I spend about 20-30 minutes on their lessons and quit when they have made an honest attempt. Wrangler came into a nice quiet halt and was rewarded.

Wrangler did a much better rein back than he had before and offered many more steps on a very light rein! I was extremely pleased with him! It was time to quit with him. I tied him outside the Round Pen so he could watch the others do their workouts…and learn to stay quietly tied… which he did!


TT 69

LTR Training Tip #69: Begin Riding with An Assistant

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Once your equine is quiet and comfortable with mounting, you’re ready to ride with an assistant at his head for safety. Just be a passenger at this stage. Stay relaxed while maintaining light pressure through your reins and legs, and let your assistant do the leading. This approach will prevent unwanted accidents.

Download Detailed Description

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Chilly Pepper – SOS 5 MORE BABIES – Will you save them too??

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

In the Middle of the ongoing call…

Last night when we arrived to pick up Tuesday’s Treasurers, I was told there are 5 new babies.

WILL YOU HELP US SAVE THEM TOO? I so need to buy more hay, grain etc., Right now I have 17 horses BEFORE we bring home this new group.

I have a wonderful Angel that has pledged to help save them, but I have to make sure we can care for them properly. One of them has boogered up his /her little face, and may need some vet care.

PLEASE HELP ME GET THESE BABIES. I am heading out as soon as I feed the kids here.

We NEED HAY & FEED, so before I can pick up more horses I need to make sure we can feed them all.

We had a flat tire last night, and the spare tire had some tiny cracks so we didn’t want to risk hauling so much weight. God works in mysterious ways as we now have a chance to save the additional 5 if we can raise funds for some feed and to get them home safely.

It’s up to you, YOU Choose – Life or Death for these horses??? PLEASE Help!

I know everyone is tired of the 911’s and emergencies. So am I! But they are not my emergencies. They belong to the life of each and every horse you help save. I can’t look at these faces and picture them being butchered alive. It’s too much to bear. So I am their voice as much as I can be, and y’all are their saviors!

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weona Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

PLEASE SAVE MY LIFE. – The lady said she would come back for us if YOU helped her.

THANK YOU!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

Have you thought about your legacy?

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Did you know that August is National Make-A-Will Month?

The subject can seem daunting … but it’s oh so important! Not only does creating a will give peace of mind and a sense of security to you and your family — but it’s a great way to create a lasting legacy for the causes you care about.

Planned gifts like wills and trusts are some of the best ways to help the charities you care about long after your lifetime.

Special gifts like these help our amazing team implement the best possible programs to protect wild horses and burros. If you’re curious how you can add a Legacy Gift on behalf of America’s wild horses to your will, check out our info on it here:

MAKE A LEGACY GIFT

Many American Wild Horse Campaign supporters have already opted to include a Legacy Gift in their will, ensuring that their legacy and passion for wild horses will be remembered for many years to come.

So when you plan your future, think about including the fight to protect wild horses in it!

– AWHC Team

P.S. Interested in other ways to give? Check out all the ways you can help wild horses!

What we’re doing *right now* to protect wild horses and burros

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Our mission is simple: We will not stop working until our cherished wild horses and burros can live out their lives in the wild where they belong.

So far, during this 2022 summer roundup season, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has already removed a devastating 6,000 wild horses and burros from their homes on public lands. As we write this, 3 separate helicopter roundup operations continue on — more than we have ever seen happen simultaneously in our organization’s history.

Thousands of innocent wild mustangs and foals are set to lose their freedom forever, only to be confined to the BLM’s holding facilities — facilities that earlier this year were stricken with deadly viruses and disease outbreaks. Perhaps worse, many of these innocent animals will likely be adopted through the BLM’s Adoption Incentive Program (AIP) — a program that has proven to be a slaughter pipeline for far too many wild horses and burros.

We will not sit by and accept this fate for our cherished wild herds. We are working day in and day out in the field, in court, and on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. to protect the lives and freedom of wild horses and burros. Today, we wanted to share with you what we’re doing right now to protect these innocent animals, but first, will you consider making a donation to power our work?

In the Field
We are not just demanding change, we’re proving that a better way is possible. For more than 3 years, AWHC’s highly successful fertility control program on the Virginia Range in Nevada has reduced the foaling rate in this historic mustang herd by over 63% — all without the removal of a single horse. The program is proving that humane fertility control is a viable alternative to costly and cruel helicopter roundups and removals — and our success on the Virginia Range is prompting the expansion of our fertility control programs to herds in other areas of Nevada and Utah, all in the name of keeping wild horses in the wild where they belong.

Meanwhile, we also launched a roundup observation program this year and are deploying informed photographers and advocates to as many helicopter roundups as possible so that the public knows what is happening to our wild horses and burros in these remote areas of the West. We also hold the BLM accountable for the animal welfare violations our observers see, such as chasing horses in extreme temperatures, for long distances, and in a manner that causes foals to be left behind, as well as capturing too many horses at once in small pens, resulting in traumatic injuries such as broken legs.

Our field work is building a powerful case for change that’s being noticed at the highest levels of Congress and the Department of the Interior (DOI).

In Court
Our legal team works around the clock to defend wild horses and burros from government actions that violate federal laws and harm these cherished animals. Right now, we are in court against the DOI and BLM to stop the disastrous AIP from proceeding in its current form, with the ultimate goal of eliminating the cash incentives, which have resulted in droves of mustangs and burros ending up in the slaughter pipeline.

When not litigating, our legal team is busy strategically evaluating every option available to further legal protections for wild horses and burros. We’re gearing up for a legal fight in Wyoming, as the BLM seeks to eradicate entire herds of the state’s wild horses they are charged with protecting and we have 11 active Freedom of Information Act lawsuits requesting BLM government records they have failed to hand over time and again.

On Capitol Hill
Our Government Relations team works in collaboration with other advocacy groups and members of Congress to ensure further legislative protections for wild horses and burros. Right now, our team is working to secure language in the Fiscal Year 2023 Appropriations bill that would better protect wild horses and burros and encourage humane, on-range management strategies. The language includes allocating $11 million of the BLM’s budget away from roundups and towards the implementation of humane, reversible fertility control programs to manage wild horses and burros in the wild, while also urging the BLM to utilize public-private partnerships with veterans and the wild horse community to implement fertility control. We’re also securing language to address the AIP and protect horses adopted through the Forest Service.

We also continue to work with Congress to pass other necessary horse and burro protections, including the Wild Horse and Burro Protection Act (H.R. 6635), which would ban the use of helicopters, the Ejiao Act (H.R. 5203), to combat the brutal trade of donkey hides, and the SAFE Act (H.R. 3355 / S. 2732), which would ban the transport of horses and burros out of the country for slaughter and keep slaughter plants closed in the U.S.

But it’s not just our Government Relations team who is putting in the work! Part of our legislative fight is mobilizing AWHC’s grassroots army to contact the BLM, Forest Service, and Congress when wild horses and burros need help the most. It is because of your support that we are able to achieve significant wins, like an early end to the Piceance Basin roundup earlier this month.

There is so much at stake for wild horses and burros. That’s why we’re fighting back in every way possible to protect the rights and lives of these cherished animals. Can you make a donation right now to help us continue our fight in the field, in courts, and on Capitol Hill to protect wild horses and burros?

DONATE

Thanks for your help,

American Wild Horse Campaign

Welcoming New Arrivals 🐴

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The following is from Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue:

 

 Welcoming Fern

Welcoming our newest member of SYA, Fern.

Fern was bailed from auction by another rescue who kindly quarantined her and gave her a safe haven at their rescue. She unfortunately is completely feral and petrified of people. Giving where she came from I can’t blame her one bit, she came from one of the worst kill pens for animal abuse and torture that we know of. She is safe now and will be treated with the kindness and the respect she deserves.

Fern has already realized that she is in a safe place. Her “bubble” when she first arrived last Monday was 20 feet. She would bolt away from any of us and stare back at us with wide eyes. Just one week later thanks to the help of Laura, Lauren and one of our training volunteers, Mike Fern let me sit with her while she ate her dinner on Friday. Creating positive associations right off the bat is so important. She sees people- good things follow. A history of  positive reinforcement and she will be our best friend hopefully soon. The more time I spend with her the more I see that she is just scared but also very curious, you can tell she wants to be helped and loved. It will not be a quick process but we are here for her and we will stick it out with her until we have earned her trust.

Volunteer Mike Dunham sat outside her pen for close to an hour in 90 degree weather last week and Fern just hung out with him. Until she decided to lay down and take a little sun nap in his presence. How sweet is that?

Two other new arrivals at the rescue, Athena and Apollo.
Athena is a very sweet grey mare, and Apollo is a stout little intact jack. After Apollo is gelded and has a behavioral exam he will be available for Adoption. His gelding date is September 24th. Apollo is 4 years old and a very active guy who will need to be adopted out to a home with another donkey gelding who likes to play.
Athena needs to continue to eat her groceries before she will be available for adoption as well. She came to us about 200 lbs. underweight and with a critically low Vitamin E level, which will need to be rechecked in another 60 days.
It’s been 5 weeks since their arrival and both have shown to be outstanding citizens, who love to be groomed and loved on. Athena is just a little over 15 hands and is just a baby at 3 years old. She has been learning ground manners while she’s been with us and  is an incredibly smart gal, and a quick learner.

Esme and Hojo are a very sweet miniature pair of donkeys who are here at the rescue with us due to their owner passing away. It’s always very sad when this happens but we are happy to be here as a safe haven for people’s donkeys, to ensure they continue to get the care they need and deserve. Hojo especially was very depressed when first arriving, we believe due to the loss of his owner. Hojo was also severely underweight due to his lack of grinding surface with his teeth and ability to chew hay. While Esme was dangerously overweight due to eating all of Hojo’s meals.

Since being here for over three four weeks now Hojo has gained an appropriate amount of weight, and Esme has lost quite a bit just by running around her dry lot with her friend. Hojo does have Cushings disease and is going to be put on medication to help manage this. His feet are also in rough shape due to the cushings, but we believe will continue to improve over time.
Both Esme and Hojo have had their dental, vaccines and their first hoof trim. Both these two cuties are senior donkeys in their 20’s and will be looking for their retirement home to love and dote on them. Both are great with kids and love ear rubs, to be groomed or to just sit and be talked to.

Welcoming Travis and Betsy! These two came from a neglect case in NJ where a sanctuary who was supposed to give them refuge, left them without adequate food or water. They are safe now and will be given the care and attention they have always deserved and needed. Both of them have had their hooves trimmed and will be seen by our vet before the end of the month. Travis, the Appaloosa pony is completely blind as far as we can tell and will most likely need at least one of his eyes removed surgically. Betsy is Travis’s seeing eye mule. She is very underweight and was very scared upon arriving, but has settled down very nicely. Betsy needs a dental exam/float, to be dewormed, and needs some serious groceries. We will also have her vitamin E levels checked as well since she’s having a hard time gaining weight. We suspect this will improve once her teeth have had some TLC. Once Travis and Betsy get healthy and sound they will be available for adoption. We realize they will probably be here quite a while due to Travis’s blindness, so we welcome anyone who would be willing to sponsor their stay with us. ❤️

Donate

Donkeys and Mules for Adoption

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Chilly Pepper – So many Babies I couldn’t get them all. Mamas, Babies and Stallions loading Tuesday??

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

STILL ANOTHER 911 CALL

THANK YOU for saving the above 11 lives. Sadly when I arrived there were SO MANY IN THE PEN, THEY WOULDN’T ALL FIT IN MY TRAILER.

I left behind Mamas, Stallions and more babies.

We did not have enough space or funding. As of this morning I have until Thursday to come up with the funds needed to save the group below. (It will cost approx $1500 just to geld and vet the 4 stallions.)

I need to raise around $5000 for this next group. THEIR LIVES MATTER!!

Meet “TROOPER“, our latest abuse/neglect case. (A starved 25 year old grandpa brutally neglected and dumped).

This beautiful little man was dumped on the reservation to be torn apart by coyotes and bears.

It’s up to you, YOU Choose – Life or Death for these horses??? PLEASE Help!

I know everyone is tired of the 911’s and emergencies. So am I! But they are not my emergencies. They belong to the life of each and every horse you help save. I can’t look at these faces and picture them being butchered alive. It’s too much to bear. So I am their voice as much as I can be, and y’all are their saviors!

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies or checks can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
19 Weona Rd.
Goldendale, WA 98620

or

checks to PO Box 233,
Golconda NV 89414

Once again we are back and forth, so all addresses are good.

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received.

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

PLEASE SAVE MY LIFE. – The lady said she would come back for us if YOU helped her.

THANK YOU!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

Thanks to you, our first major media campaign was a success

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Last month, more than 800 wild horses were removed from Piceance Basin in Colorado. You asked us to speak up and be a voice for these protected and treasured mustangs. So we did.

Thanks to the commitment of supporters like yourself, we were able to create a media campaign that made Colorado residents aware of the cruel roundup of innocent wild horses — the biggest in state history — happening right in their backyard.

We took to TV screens and major Colorado news publications to launch a statewide campaign highlighting how unnecessary and poorly-timed these ongoing summer roundups are — and how the helicopters must be grounded immediately.

Our TV spot aired for two weeks across three cable networks in the Denver market and we were able to reach hundreds of thousands of Colorado residents who took action swiftly. Over 19,000 Coloradan wild horse advocates sent messages to their Congressional representatives demanding an end to the Piceance Basin roundup.

Thanks to supporters like you, we were also able to:

But, we cannot escape the cruel truth that more than 800 wild horses were rounded up in Piceance Basin and now face an uncertain future. We will not stop working until each and every one of these cherished American mustangs is able to live out their lives in the wild where they belong.

The BLM’s Piceance Basin roundup was filled with animal welfare violations, injuries among innocent mustangs and foals, and several avoidable casualties. Thanks to all of our supporters, new and old, not only were we able to help keep over 700 wild horses free on the public lands they call home, we were able to drive essential messages about this devastating roundup and build awareness of our mission to protect the freedom of America’s wild herds.

Our shared efforts will not stop at the Colorado border. In fact, thanks to your support, we’re just getting started → We’re planning to take this campaign NATIONWIDE to keep up the focus on the protection our wild horses deserve.

When we raise our voices together, there is nothing we can’t achieve for our beloved wild herds. We need to maintain this momentum from the Colorado campaign and expand our efforts across the country. But we’ll need your continued support to do that. Will you make a contribution now to help us take this campaign to the next level nationwide?

DONATE

Thank you,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

StormyAprilEarsArticle11 3 11 111CC

MULE CROSSING: Handling Your Mule’s Ears

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By Meredith Hodges

Just how sensitive is a mule about having his ears touched? If a mule is handled often and properly, he should be no more sensitive about his ears than he is about any other part of his body. However, if he is rarely handled, mishandled or handled roughly, he can become quite sensitive about any part of his body and in particular, his ears. Bearing this in mind, take the time to desensitize your mule to touch and handling by paying attention to how he likes to be touched in any given area, and then by being polite about handling those more sensitive areas. This is an important part of any training program, both for general management and for safety purposes. This is the heart of imprinting.

The mule that has an aversion to having his ears handled poses a problem with management convenience, but more than that, he can be a safety hazard in many situations. Here are some examples of lack of desensitization causing inconvenience and possibly, a dangerous situation. Inconvenient: Your mule does not want his ears touched, so you have to disassemble his bridle each time you put it on him. Dangerous: Should you accidentally touch his ears while putting the bridle on him, he could possibly thrash his head around and knock you silly! Inconvenient: If you get into a difficult spot on a trail where you have to dismount and move quickly, you may be unable to take the reins over your mule’s head in order to safely lead him. Dangerous: While you try to get the reins over his head without touching his ears, your mule could inadvertently knock you down or lose his balance and fall down while trying to avoid you. The moral is this: If your mule is to be a completely safe riding animal, he must be appropriately desensitized all over his head and body—including his ears—and trust that you will not harm him.

Desensitization should be humane and considerate—never abusive. When we say we want to desensitize an animal, it simply means that we want him to become accustomed to touch and handling all over his body, particularly in areas such as his head, legs and rear quarters, where he is apt to be the most sensitive. An animal that has not been politely desensitized will tend to react more violently to touch. When properly teaching your mule to become desensitized, your touch should be presented in a pleasurable way, so that your mule not only learns to tolerate it, but to actually enjoy it and look forward to it. An old-time method such as “sacking out” is a somewhat crude technique that is used to desensitize an animal by tying the mule in a corner where he cannot flee, and then flinging a tarp or large canvas all over his body, including the head. Often times, it creates more problems than it can solve because it is rarely done politely. A mule that has been “sacked” about the head can actually become more sensitive because this inconsiderate approach teaches him that humans cannot be trusted. He perceives that they will fling things over his head, blinding him and causing him anxiety for no apparent reason. The mule will stand still only because he cannot move, but if he is given the opportunity to flee or fight back, he will more than likely do so. Thus, the old “obstinate mule” myths are actually most often the result of some fault of the trainer, and not the mule. Sacking out more politely will eliminate these kinds of potential bad habits.

Desensitizing a mule that is sensitive about his ears is a long-term process. First, you must maintain a firm, quiet and tolerant attitude. Nothing your mule does should make you angry enough to lose your temper or your patience. Make sure your mule is tacked with a stout, non-breakable halter and rope. While stroking his nose in a polite and soothing manner, ask your mule to come forward, one step at a time, to a stout hitch rail. If he won’t come easily, just snub your lead on the hitch rail so he cannot go backwards, and keep coaxing him forward until he comes. Take up the slack with each step and then hold until he takes another step forward toward the hitch rail. Wait as long as it takes for him to gain confidence enough to come forward. Do not get into a pulling or pushing match with him—you will only create resistance in him and perpetuate avoidance behaviors—and he will win because he is stronger and he weighs more!

When his nose is finally up to the rail, run your lead around the post and come through the noseband on his halter and around the post again. Then tie him off snugly, so that his nose is tied as closely as possible to the hitch rail, making sure there is no slack. Now begin softly stroking your mule’s nose, using gentle yet firm strokes. Next, work your way up his forehead, and finally toward his ears. NOTE: Remember to use soft, gentle yet firm strokes, going with the grain of the hair and never against it. Do not “pat” your mule—it’s too threatening.

Let the tips of your fingers find the base of your mule’s ear (away from the open side) and stroke upward, toward the tip. At this point, he will probably thrash his head back and forth to avoid your touch—just remain slow, deliberate, reassuring and gentle about your approach. When he has allowed you to stroke the ear, even if for only a couple of seconds, leave your hand resting on the ear and use your free hand to feed him an oats reward. Don’t take your hand away from the ear until he is chewing calmly and no longer worried about your hand on his ear. Do this with each ear no more than one or two times each session and then go to his shoulder and work your hand in a massaging fashion over his neck, toward his ears. While your thumb cradles an ear, let your fingers move over his poll. With your thumb, gently stroke upward on the back of his ear, while leaving the rest of your hand over his poll. If he jerks away, just keep going back to the same position of thumb cradling the ear and fingers moving over the poll.

When he will tolerate this, you can then cradle the ear in your fingers and with your thumb, begin to gently rub upward on the inside of the edge of his ear. Do not go too deep into the ear at first. After he is calm with this, you can begin rubbing downward into the ear with your fingers, while cradling the ear in your opposite hand, being very careful not to go too deep. Watch his eyes and allow him to “tell” you how deep to go. If it feels good, his eyebrows will raise and flicker. If he doesn’t like it, he will simply jerk his head away and that is your cue to lighten up. Most mules love to have the insides of their ears rubbed, so find the areas inside your mule’s ear that actually give him pleasure. Each individual mule will be different.

In the next step, you will be in the same position, but you will close your hand around your mule’s ear and hold it with just enough pressure that he cannot jerk your hand loose. Do not hold too tight, grab or pull the ear—just maintain a quiet, gentle hold on the ear and go with his movement. If he pulls away, just slightly tighten your grip on the ear until he stops pulling and then lighten your grip again. Tighten only when he pulls away, and then immediately release when he stops resisting—tighten and loosen your grip as needed, and be sure to follow his movement. He will soon learn that if he doesn’t fight it, there is no discomfort. Never tightly grip his ear and do not tighten your grip any more than you need to in order to hold onto the ear—you never want to induce pain. Once your mule is tolerant of you holding his ear in this fashion, you can introduce the clippers, should you desire, using the same guidelines of tightening gently yet firmly when he pulls and releasing when he submits. However, introduce the clippers only after he has completely accepted you holding his ears.

Introduce the bridle by holding your right hand flat on the poll between your mule’s ears, and by using your left hand to raise the crown piece over his nose and up to his forehead. Slide your right hand down his forehead a little to meet your left hand. When your hands meet, transfer the crown piece into your right hand, insert the bit with your left hand, and then raise the crown piece up to the base of his ears. Slowly transfer the crown strap back to your left hand. Gently cup the fingers of your right hand around the base of his right ear. Now bend the ear forward and under the crown piece and slide it over your hand (and the ear) into its position behind the ear. While keeping your palm firmly on your mule’s poll, slowly move to the left ear and repeat the same movements.
The bridle should now be in place and you can reward your mule. Do not put on and remove the bridle any more than once per session. Your mule needs to clearly know that this is not just some annoying past time you have discovered, but an act of necessity. He will soon learn that if he cooperates, it won’t take too long. Once the bridle is on, get right to the business at hand and forget the ears for a while.

When you return with the difficult mule, tie him as before, stand directly in front of him (with the hitch rail between you) and gently remove the bridle with both hands lifting and sliding the crown piece over both of his ears simultaneously, so there is little pressure on his ears as it slides over them. If he still holds the bit in his mouth, hesitate for a minute when the bridle is off his ears and allow HIM to drop the bit. Removing the bridle this way will help to avoid chafing the ears and will avoid the bit hitting his teeth before you remove the bridle the rest of the way. Always removing the bridle in this fashion will encourage him to drop his head and will prevent bad habits such as pulling away or flinging his head.

When your mule gets used to having his ears handled and being bridled while snubbed and haltered, you can then begin dropping the halter and loosely tying him while he is being bridled. Sometimes it takes a couple of weeks before you can drop the halter—this will vary depending on the individual mule, so just be patient. Your quiet, gentle perseverance will eventually win out and your mule’s ears will be desensitized and quite manageable. After you have mastered his outer ear and inner ear, you may find that your mule actually enjoys having his inner ear stroked or scratched, and bridling becomes easy. Integrating washing his face and cleaning his nostrils and ears during the grooming process should further help him to accept having his ears handled. Handling your mule’s ears can actually become a truly pleasurable experience for your Longears.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

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