Monthly Archive for: ‘November, 2021’

I’m proud to support AWHC this Giving Tuesday — will you join me?

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Allow me to introduce myself, I’m Lin — a life-long wild horse lover and friend of the American Wild Horse Campaign (AWHC). I wanted to reach out to you today to tell you about all of the important work AWHC is doing and why I’m proud to match every donation made to AWHC today as part of Giving Tuesday.

My love for horses started when I was a child. I was drawn to these breathtaking animals because they are just the most magnificent creatures!

When I learned the plight of the wild horses and burros living on our public lands, I was appalled. They have lived in the wild for hundreds of years, but special interests have lobbied for decades for the removal of these cherished icons so that private cattle can graze on federal lands.

As a result, wild horses and burros face the constant threat of brutal helicopter roundups, which remove them from the lands they call home, split up family bands, and cause them immense trauma.

It’s a devastating reality, but I have hope for the future of America’s wild horses and burros. Why? Because AWHC is doing the hard work necessary to help these animals maintain their freedom.

Will you make a donation of whatever you can afford today to fuel AWHC’s fight for wild horses and burros? I’ll match every donation made today up to $40,000 so that your gift can go twice as far.

I’m proud to work with the AWHC because they are doing more than any other organization to save our wild mustangs and keep them free on our public lands.

From legal battles, to working with the federal government to create new laws that protect these cherished animals, to funding scientific research to provide humane alternatives to manage wild horse and burro populations instead of traumatic helicopter roundups — AWHC is doing it all!

I’m so proud to support the amazing work AWHC is doing, and I hope you will too. That’s why today, I will match every donation made to AWHC up to $40,000 so that your gift can go twice as far for wild horses and burros this holiday season.

HAVE YOUR GIFT DOUBLED →

Thanks,
Lin

We’re raising money this #GivingTuesday to keep wild horses WILD >>

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Giving Tuesday is finally here — and so is our biggest Giving Tuesday fundraising goal EVER! 

Last week, we emailed you about an exciting match opportunity — and I’m thrilled to announce that we unlocked our Giving Tuesday 2x Match, so all gifts made today will be DOUBLED!

We set a goal to raise $75,000 before midnight tonight to fuel our fight for wild horses and burros as we head into 2022. This might seem like a lot, but Giving Tuesday is our most critical fundraising day of the entire year, and 2022 is set to be our busiest year yet!

Can you help kickstart our Giving Tuesday fundraising with a donation to AWHC right now?

HAVE YOUR GIFT DOUBLED → DONATE NOW

Earlier this year, we uncovered the wild horse-to-slaughter pipeline that has resulted from the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) failed Adoption Incentive Program (AIP). After exposing this disastrous program, we filed a lawsuit against the BLM.

While the BLM announced reforms to the program as a result of the uproar we caused — their reforms are not enough and hundreds of horses and burros are still being dumped in kill pens.

That’s why we’re dedicating part of the funds raised today to the victims of the Adoption Incentive Program. Your donation today will help to continue our lawsuit against the BLM and fuel our fight to prevent more wild horses and burros from entering the slaughter pipeline through the AIP.

Will you make a 2x matched donation right now to fuel this important work?

The BLM has failed the wild horses and burros that have been placed in jeopardy through the Adoption Incentive Program. But our work to help rescue the AIP’s victims and litigate for the termination of the program won’t stop.

Will you make a donation to fuel our Legal Fund and our continued litigation against the BLM? Donate now and have your gift DOUBLED today!

HAVE YOUR GIFT DOUBLED → DONATE NOW

Thank you so much for your help, Meredith.

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

Rock And Roll Diary Of A Rescue Part 1 4

MULE CROSSING: Rock and Roll: Diary of a Rescue, Part 1

10

By Meredith Hodges

I first saw Rock and Roll at the National Western Stock Show in January of 2010. The two Belgian draft mules looked enormous in the 12′ X 12′ stalls in the holding area. They had been rescued from slaughter at an auction in Kiowa by my two friends, Fran and Larry Howe, owners of the Bitterroot Mule Company in Bennett, Colorado. My friends explained why they couldn’t resist trying to help the two draft mules. They were the largest mules any of us had ever seen. Roll was supposedly 16 years old at 17 1/2 hands and Rock supposedly 17 years old at 18 hands. Both mules were severely underweight. Rock had recently been treated for abscesses, which required the removal of two molars. The two draft mules stood quietly, seemingly unaffected, as we stared in total amazement. A rescue attempt was certainly worth trying.

In August of 2010, I saw Roll again at the Larimer County Fair. Larry drove him in the Single Hitch classes and, when I was able to speak to him, he and Fran told me Rock could not come to the show. He had come up lame. Roll had put on weight and was looking better than he had looked in January however, he still appeared to be stressed. Longears have been known to die from depression, so one of my main concerns was if Rock died, Roll could become depressed and might not live very long. Fran and Larry decided that this rescue was more than they could handle and asked if I would be interested in taking the pair. I agreed, and after we had quickly made a suitable space for them, Rock and Roll were delivered to the Lucky Three Ranch on December 5th, 2010. One look at the way Rock was moving and we knew this was going to be difficult at best.

Rock and Roll were obedient, but suspicious animals. Their eyes lacked expression and were cloudy in spots, and their coats were oily and dull, something that is not apparent in photographs. Their hooves looked irregularly trimmed and out of balance, with prevalent stress rings on all four feet of each mule. They had clearly been foundered more than once and their bodies were riddled with scar tissue. Roll listed to the right and walked with a twist to the right hind foot. Rock had to lift and swing his right hind leg to the side in order to walk forward. The leg appeared calcified and restricted in every joint. Neither mule could freely reach forward through the shoulders and hips, nor place each foot in a regular rhythmic fashion. There was muscle atrophy throughout their bodies, and their bellies hung from the spine, with no apparent musculature in the abdomen or over the top line. There was hope for some recovery with Roll, but when my well-respected equine masseuse, Joanne Lang, C.M.T. and I assessed Rock, we knew there would be limitations as to what could be done for him. We both knew we might be setting ourselves up for a broken heart, but for Roll’s sake, we agreed to try to make Rock comfortable for as long as we could.

Before beginning therapy, Joanne and I gathered all the information we could on Rock and Roll. This was not an easy task, as there were no registration or health papers, only the information that Bitterroot Mule Company could provide. The pair was not eating very well, and by the way he was turning his nose up at the feed, I suspected Rock might even have ulcers. Fran and Larry told me what they had fed the mules. I promptly took them both off the feed that would clearly be, in my experience, too rich for them and put them on our standard equine diet. Because both mules were branded, we were able to identify the brands as coming from the Hunt Limousine Cattle Ranch in Elizabeth, Colorado. We later discovered that the Hunt Limousine Cattle Ranch had obtained Rock and Roll when they were just three years old from an Amish Family in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Both Rock and Roll were out of sister Belgian mares, and by the same jack. Rock and Roll mostly pulled a wagon for birthday parties for 6 yr olds at the ranch. They also pulled the wagon for a nearby church so they could sing Christmas carols in the towns of Elizabeth and Kiowa, Colorado, and were also used to pull Grand Marshalls and other dignitaries in local parades.

Rock and Roll, along with two other teams were well taken care of and loved deeply by the family who cared for the ranch. A ranch wife to one of the hands took the responsibility of scheduling routine farrier appointments and vaccinations for them and ten other ranch horses. Unfortunately the ranch was eventually in a position in 2002 when they had to be sold. The family who cared for them was “heart broke and sad.” At that point, they were healthy and weighed 2500 pounds each. What happened afterwards is still a mystery, but one thing was tragically clear—they were overworked, out of good posture and not properly fed. Many people just don’t realize that even big draft mules need the benefit of a healthy diet and a specialized exercise program, especially before starting work in harness.

Within days after changing their feed to our crimped oats mix with Sho Glo, Mazola corn oil and grass hay only, the two mules’ appetites improved. There was a drastic change in their coats and their eyes began to come alive. We gave them a small turnout area just off their runs and along the county road, so they could watch the people going by and the cattle grazing on the other side. Rock would go into the corner of the pasture and just stand and stare for hours, not moving until he was called back in.

I noticed that Rock did not lie down or roll, but considering how neglected they had been, this didn’t really surprise me. Because of the muscle atrophy in his right hip, we decided that we should get started with Rock immediately. So, the very afternoon they were delivered, Rock got his first massage. He was tolerant of the massage, but we soon discovered that touching his face was out of the question. Both mules would shy away if anyone so much as raised a hand or made any small abrupt movement in their presence. We also noticed that Rock had a perpetual and distinctive worried “V” in his eyebrows over both eyes. A health check with our veterinarian was scheduled and we continued equine chiropractic, using the same equine chiropractor that was used when Fran and Larry first got Rock and Roll. After a couple of months of chiropractics, regular farrier and vet visits with massage and physical therapy done on a weekly basis, Rock was finally able to get down on his left side and roll. He and Roll then began to play!

Our farrier Dean Geesen came out to the Lucky Three and gave both mules their first official trims. Our support team agreed that it would be a long time before their feet would begin to look normal. During a farrier visit in March, we discovered that Rock had two old abscesses in his left front hoof. Dean was guarded about whether or not Rock’s hooves would ever be okay again. But Rock was a real trooper and although it was very difficult for him, he managed to yield all four feet when asked.

When our veterinarian Greg Farrand checked his eyes, he found cloudiness and thickening over the corneas. He was put on a regimen of eye drops three times a day to stave off chronic abrasion of the eye. Within days, Rock was chasing bunnies around the small turnout pasture—no more standing in the corner! Greg also did a walking palpation to see if he could determine what was causing the lameness in Rock’s right hip. He thought he felt a fracture on the face of the pelvis, but there was no way to really tell exactly what was going on. To find out for certain, Rock would have to be taken to Colorado State University, sedated and turned upside down in order for any necessary radiograms or ultrasound tests to be performed. We all agreed that this process would be far too traumatic for him. We opted to just be
very careful and not to do any manual range-of-motion movements on that leg for fear of making it worse. Instead, I discovered a way to have Rock do range-of-motion exercises on his own during physical therapy and my adjustments worked well. Rock and Roll continued to improve. Roll even graduated from the leading core muscle exercises to the round pen core muscle exercises. Rock and Roll began to play and argue with each other. The pair seemed to be gaining strength and proprioception (body awareness), and both seemed to be feeling much better overall. After a very short time, both mules complied—on verbal commands alone—to correct their own balance and square up at every halt…because it felt good!

In mid-March, we had Rock’s feet x-rayed and it was found that there was 45 degrees of rotation in both hind feet. There was no rotation in front, although the front feet did have multiple stress rings, collapse of the hoof wall and were starting to exhibit seedy toes. Rock couldn’t stand on the four-inch blocks the vet used to x-ray him, so we made do with a couple of two-by–four boards. Even when the farrier worked on him, we would have to put Rock’s rear feet on an equine jack stand to trim him. After learning to successfully execute his balancing pattern during physical therapy, we noticed that the soles of Rock’s feet were beginning to wear away. When the x-rays came back, they showed that only a quarter of an inch of sole was left on the bottoms of each of his rotating hind feet. We then immediately got shoes on those back feet! We began a regimen of Thrush Buster and Rainmaker hoof dressing by Farnam on both mules’ hooves in order to help the hooves to begin to grow back in a healthy way. By April, Rock had grown three-eighths of an inch more sole on his hind feet and was actually trotting over his ground poles!

Now that Rock was feeling better, the worried “V” over his eyes began to disappear. He was actually getting up and lying down, but due to the difficulty he had, he began to get sores on his hocks that needed to be wrapped and tended with Panalog ointment. Although the sores were obviously very painful, Rock allowed me to wrap them and doctor them with little complaint. Once wrapped, he happily munched his oats reward for his stellar behavior and gently placed his forehead on my chest in a clear gesture of gratitude.

In Part 2 of Rock and Roll: Diary of a Rescue, Rock’s roller-coaster progress of victories and set-backs continues, as Roll slowly comes out of his shell and learns to trust us and—even more importantly—himself. Our regimen of compassion, patience and therapy goes on as Rock and Roll touch everyone’s soul by proving that they are ready and willing to give it everything they’ve got, right from their hearts.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2012, 2016, 2020, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Your Black Friday purchase might just help protect wild horses >>

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We’re sure you won’t want to miss these wild gifts this holiday season!!

This Black Friday, use some of your shopping dollars to protect wild horses and burros!

When you purchase any of these special items below, a portion of the proceeds will go directly toward the fight to keep wild horses wild!

Happy shopping!

— AWHC Team

Thinking of all our AWHC supporters this Thanksgiving

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

On this Thanksgiving holiday — from all of us here at the American Wild Horse Campaign — I want to send my heartfelt thanks to you for your support and dedication to protecting America’s wild horses and burros.

You have helped us accomplish some pretty amazing things this year, and for that, we are so grateful.

Supporters like you helped us expose the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Adoption Incentive Program (AIP) as a pipeline to slaughter for “truckloads” of wild horses and burros. Our investigation led to a front-page New York Times exposé, which elevated this devastating issue to the national level.

Your support provided our field team with the resources and equipment necessary to successfully implement the world’s largest PZP fertility control program for wild horses on Nevada’s Virginia Range. This groundbreaking program is proving that there is a better way to manage wild horses and burros besides brutally rounding them up with helicopters.

And guess what? It’s working. This year, we reduced the foaling rate by more than 40% as compared to 2020. These incredible results armed our Government Relations team with the statistics and evidence necessary to secure $11 million in funding towards a comprehensive, humane fertility control vaccine program as part of the BLM’s 2022 Fiscal Year budget.

Your efforts helped us defeat SJR3 — a resolution that called for the removal of close to 40,000 wild horses and burros from their homes in Nevada. And your generosity helped us support the rescues of innocent foals on the Virginia Range, like Hazel, and victims of the AIP including 12 BLM-branded burros from an Oklahoma kill pen and 10 unhandled mustangs from a kill pen in Colorado.

As 2021 comes to a close, we are grateful for your advocacy, your financial support, and your passion and dedication to protecting the wild horses and burros we all cherish. Many battles lie before us in the new year as we work toward a better future for these magnificent animals, but with you on our side, we know we will prevail.

All of us at AWHC wish you and your loved ones (human and non-human) a very happy and restful Thanksgiving holiday.

Warmly,
Suzanne

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

P.S. Giving Tuesday is less than 1 week away! If you’d like to help kickstart our #GivingTuesday efforts, every gift made now through Tuesday will be matched up to $40,000! You can donate here to double your impact for wild horses and burros in 2022!

JackCop Joker 1 1

MULE CROSSING: Jack Copp and Joker

0

By Meredith Hodges

Jack Copp was a very special man with a very special mule. Jack was born in Fairfax, Oklahoma, about 45 miles south of the Kansas border. His father worked with mules in the oil fields acquired
from the Osage Indians by the U.S. Government years before. Although his father was familiar with mules, Jack was enamored with horses and particularly with team roping. Jack, a congenial and responsible man, worked at his job for 27 years and roped steers in his spare time.

Then came the accident that changed his life. Jack was run over by a forklift that left him partially crippled for the rest of his life. He could no longer do the things he loved the most. In the midst of his depression, he met an old man who suggested that he get a couple of mules to mess with. “They’ll git you on your feet,” he said. Jack took the man’s advice and bought Joker, a sorrel yearling mule colt, and his sister, Sissy, a weanling molly mule in November of 1978. By May of 1979, Jack had taught Joker enough tricks to entertain the audience at Bishop Mule Days in California.

This was where I first saw them. In six short months Jack had Joker (only two years old) stretching, sitting, laying down, carrying his feed bucket, rolling a barrel with his front legs, and walking on his hind legs. What he had done with that handsome young mule was remarkable, but what Joker had done for Jack was even more amazing. Jack’s life was given new meaning and his faith restored by this long-eared, little red mule. Sissy, Joker’s sister, was sold and put into training with famed mule trainer Pat Parelli of California, while Jack and Joker became the very best of friends.

Joker was sired by a Spanish jack, called Red Fox, that was killed by a hunter, and out of a Thoroughbred/Quarter Horse mare. He captured the hearts of all who were fortunate enough to witness his performances. The bond between Jack and Joker was evident as spectators delighted in watching a repertoire of 30 tricks or more. As Jack is a bashful man, Joker often had to push him into the arena to get things started. They began with a good stretch to loosen up the muscles and then Joker was ready to show his stuff. In top condition, Joker showed he could walk on three legs, then on two legs. This was pretty tough for a mule, but he did it out of love for Jack. Joker had no qualms about carrying his feed bucket to remind Jack of dinnertime. But Jack was a demanding trainer and concerned parent and made Joker earn his dinner by rolling a barrel with his front feet. When rolling the barrel forward became boring, Jack taught him to roll it backwards with his hind legs. As if this weren’t tough enough, Joker later learned to roll the barrel both backwards and forwards while straddling it! All this work is sometimes tiring, so Jack thought a short nap would be in order. Joker obliged his command by lying down–his rump made a handy seat for Jack to also take a rest.

At coffee break time, Joker took his shorter rests in a sitting position. Considerate of Jack, as a best friend should be, Joker stretched, lowering his back so that Jack could reach the stirrup easily to mount. Joker knew that tires are for traveling, but his only use for one was to plant his front feet on it, traveling around it with his back feet; or to plant his back feet on it and travel around it with his front feet. At the “End of the Trail,’ Joker placed all four feet on the tire, exhibiting his excellent balance. Jack and Joker were patriotic Americans. Joker would fly the flag while walking on his hind legs. Then Jack would take the flag while Joker bowed to the audience in appreciation for the applause!

Not limited only to tricks, Jack removed the bridle and showed people how well trained Joker really was. Without the bridle, Joker performed pleasure, reining patterns, and trail obstacles with ease. No whips, no spurs, no bats–it’s all done with patience and love that you can feel as you watch them. They were quite remarkable! Jack believed that training a mule is like raising a child. If you slap them, bang on them, or worse, they will have no respect.

Mules will either be afraid of you or fight back. Of course, discipline is in order on occasion, but you don’t have to keep doing it. Once Jack began training Joker, Joker was not allowed to run with other animals. Jack was his only close companion. Others never distracted Joker from his best friend, Jack! Jack and Joker have performed at county fairs and shows throughout the U.S. and they were both loved and appreciated wherever they went. The fees for these shows were minimal–just enough to cover their traveling expenses. What a privilege it was to witness this incredible pair!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1986, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

RSVP NOW >> Keep WY Wyld Virtual Rally

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Please join us on Thursday, December 2 at 3PM EST/12PM PST for a Virtual Rally to #KeepWYWyld and to protect the wild horses of the Wyoming Checkerboard! Click here for more information and to RSVP for the rally.

RSVP NOW >>

During this event, we’ll be taking a look at livestock grazing in the Wyoming Checkerboard and the resulting removal of the wild horses living in the area. AWHC Communications Director, Grace Kuhn will be emceeing the event as we provide an update on our efforts in Wyoming and how we could use your help! 

The event will also feature wild horse photographer Carol Walker, who has been on the ground as an observer of the roundup for AWHC and has spent significant time with these cherished herds! You’ll have a chance to hear the inside scoop on how the day-to-day roundup operations have been executed and as well as a few stories from the range!

We will also be premiering a mini-documentary about the issues surrounding livestock grazing — the competition with our federally-protected mustangs — with a special focus on this area in Wyoming! Erik Molvar, the Executive Director of the Western Watersheds Project is featured in the film and will speak with attendees about the situation in Wyoming as well as answer any questions during our Q&A about what’s happening on the ground. 

Last but certainly not least, be prepared for some calls to action now that you are up to speed on this devastating roundup about how you can fight to preserve the freedom of Wyoming’s wild horses! 

So please RSVP now to join members of the AWHC team, advocates and photographers on December 2 for a Virtual Rally in our collective efforts to #KeepWYWyld!

RSVP NOW >>

Thank you,

AWHC Team

Announcing our biggest Giving Tuesday goal EVER!

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Giving Tuesday is just around the corner — and I’m excited to announce that this year, we’ve set our biggest fundraising goal everThis Giving Tuesday, we’re aiming to raise $75,000 so we have the resources necessary to fuel our work in the field, in courts, and on the Hill in 2022. 

You see, Giving Tuesday is our most critical fundraising day of the entire year. And, this year is even more significant because a generous donor and AWHC supporter, Lin Coonan, has offered to match all donations this Giving Tuesday up to $40,000!

But, there’s a catch → In order to unlock this very special double match, we need to kickstart our Giving Tuesday fundraising and raise $35,000 before this Sunday at midnight! Will you make a donation right now to help us unlock this critical match and DOUBLE your impact this Giving Tuesday?

UNLOCK THE MATCH →

So much is at stake in 2022. RIGHT NOW, the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Fiscal Year 2022 budget includes a proposed increase in funding that can be used toward wild horse and burro roundups and removals.

While this might seem disastrous, there’s still hope. The BLM just appointed their newest director, and we’re using every resource at our disposal to fight for meaningful change for wild horses and burros with this new transition in leadership. But timing is of the essence — we must act now.

Will you make a donation right now to help unlock our Giving Tuesday 2x Match so that we can DOUBLE our impact for wild horses in 2022?

UNLOCK THE MATCH →

Thanks for your help, 

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

AHC Latest News- November 2021

0

The following is from the American Horse Council:

November 2021

Former members

Copyright © 2021 American Horse Council
The AHC News is published monthly and we’d love to recruit you back as a member. Don’t miss out on the latest legislative and regulatory updates, along with news and industry efforts.

 

AHC Annual Congressional Fly-In October 28th  – Highlights & Recap

  • Helping American’s veterans with Equine Assisted Services.  Rep. Andy Barr (R-KY) spoke to how evidence-based research has proven the effectiveness of EAS in helping youth, veterans, and the disabled community, Adaptive Sports Program through VA initially helped with funding for EAS with $1.5 million which was increased in 2020 to $5 million in grant appropriations.  Barr urged the attendees to contact Senators about keeping this 5 million dedicated to EAS and to improve upon that.  Barr also spoke regarding the Suicide Prevention Bill, John Scott Hannon Mental Health Care and Improvement Act.  Data shows that 21 Veterans take their lives every day in USA.  Only 14 of those had any sort of interaction with the VA in the previous 2 years – thus we need other entry points and access points for Veterans who are not utilizing the VA.  Barr offered an amendment for non-VA organizations, which passed and made it into the final bill.   Barr again asked attendees to talk to Senators to keep the house amendment on a dedicated budget.
    Kathy Alm of PATH Intl. and Ruth Dismuke-Blakely of AHA mentioned that EAS for veterans should all fall under the umbrella of mental health and keeping the boundaries clear regarding treatment for Veterans when it comes to EAS.  When it’s under Adaptive Sports, it undermines EAS as a treatment strategy when asking for reimbursement and confuses the public. Barr agreed to have further discussion and investigate strategies.
  • Guest Workers – We need them, but can we get them?  Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD) who is the lead on H2B Visas, shared how we need temporary workers to help fill the vast need for farm workers and the returning worker exemption is one option or exempt/remove some from H2B.  Rep. Harris asked attendees to help his colleagues on the hill learn and understand the difference between immigration vs guest workers, as the penalties are strict for temporary work visas.
  • House Ag Committee Update Rep. GT Thompson (R-PA) shared his goal of being a strong voice for American Agriculture.  The House Ag Committee is blessed with opportunities to help Agriculture rebound from these crisis (COVID, natural disasters, etc.).
  • What’s happening with Tax policy? Jordan Harris and Mason Foley of Sen. Mitch McConnell’s (R-KY) office spoke about the new framework for reconciliation package which was recently released.  AHC staff asked about the Build Back Better – looking to get this reevaluated and would like suggestions on raising the awareness.
  • Can another state’s legislative issues affect me? Case Studies… 11:30 AM Julie Beeman spoke regarding CAFO (Concentrated Animal Feed Operations) Challenges in CA and shared San Jan Capistrano Case Study.  Scott Dorenkamp of PRCA spoke of potential rodeo ban in Los Angeles CA. Concern that this movement will move up and down the state of CA and into CO.  With potential impact on future equestrian events that involve fixed spurs.  If Rodeo is banned, others will not be far behind, so it is in everyone’s interest to pay attention to this.
  • Senate Ag Committee Update  Kyle Varner of Sen. Deb Stabenow’s Office (D-MI) shared that thus far this year the committee has been working on confirming any administration nominees, turnover of secretary positions at USDA.  28 Nominees.  COVID relief package passed, monitoring the USDAs release of those assistance programs.  Kinks in the supply chain.  Varner also spoke about climate change and Introduced Growing Climate Solutions Act, 94-6 vote passed out of the Senate.  Intended to help USDA put more structure around carbon markets that producers are taking advantage of.  Helps provide more certainty for farmers/ranchers in getting involved with that, certification process for USDA.  Certification process for verifiers on the ground, so farmers know who to trust.  One stop shop website for producers who are interested in participating in the carbon markets.  Varner stated that the committee will start turning to more formal review of 2018 Farm Bill. Current bill doesn’t expire until 2023, so there is time for industry input. AHC staff mentioned the Equine Industry is consistently underrepresented in the USDA census data.  Making that large gap in numbers critical to address for future changes to the Farm Bill.
  • What is the status of the PAST Act?  Rep Steve Cohen (D- TN) shared that the PAST Act was introduced in June, with 209 co-sponsors initially, 234 now, which is majority of the house.  Cohen also noted that in 2017, USDA submitted a role to the OMB (Office of Management and Budget) that would take the language from the Past Act and codify it in a way that the USDA could take action on it now.  This rule change gives USDA the teeth they need to enforce the Horse Protection Act.  If this rule was to be introduced, it would likely be adopted.
  • What is the Congressional Horse Caucus and what are its priorities?  Rep. Paul Tonko (D-NY) noted that the Equine Industry contributes over $50 billion to the US economy annually and plays a key role in conserving agricultural land.  The Caucus Is made up of bi-partisan members who are aware of and support the Equine Industry as well as the health and safety of horses in the racing industry.   Tonko urged the attendees to use storytelling as a tool to help get PAST Act over the finish line.  And AHC offered its services to help grow the Horse Caucus and its mission – outreach, build by consensus.
  • Updates from the US Dept. of Agriculture
    Oscar Gonzales, Asst. Secretary USDA spoke about his 3rd generation connection to the horse industry and efforts underway by National Security Council, to bring in workers from Ecuador, El Salvador & Guatemala to help with season work and address labor shortage.  Gonzales also spoke about keeping eyes out for legislation to unleash a substantial amount of funding in rural areas.  Making sure that children are fed and that the needs of rural America are being met.  Reaching out to small business owners, most families in agriculture have some form of supplemental small business.  Providing workshops to find out what the needs of small business owners are. AHC staff asked if there is any discussion about reintroducing the rule change in the Horse Protection Act – Specifically realigning the language around testing procedures and protocols related to the PAST Act. Gonzales said he was not up to speed on this and would make inquiries.  AHC staff also noted that the Farm Bill is an important part of the USDA’s program funding, and the equine industry is looking to include more provisions for better horse census numbers.  AHC would like to see the USDA to find a better solution to this problem, and better realize the equine population in the United States.  Lynn Coakley of Equus Foundation asked if Gonzales had any idea why the number of horses being exported for slaughter appear to have decreased significantly in the past year?  Discussion about possibilities followed including potentially more awareness about the issue, less demand, and COVID possibly reducing the number of horses crossing the border.
  • How to get the biggest bang from Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA)?  Sherry Reaves & Brenda Yankoviak of USFS spoke to the GAOA.  The GAOA provides funding through Legacy Restoration Fund (LRF).  Forest Service is the largest agency under the Department of Agriculture. National Parks and Public Legacy Restoration Fund, authorized up to $285 Million annually.  Used to address deferred maintenance (maintenance that was not performed when it was scheduled or should have been accomplished and which, therefore, was put off or delayed for a future period.  Yankoviak suggested what makes a successful GAOA project includes Priorities:  deferred maintenance reduction, visitor access and experience, supporting undeserved communities, mitigating climate change, leveraging partnerships.
    Creating story maps and connecting people to these projects.  Promoting these improvements across the country.  The more people see the impacts, the more they are willing to support and contribute.  Share your stories!
    How to get involved:  Leverage funding, collaborate on project development, provide feedback on projects, assist with data collection, and volunteer!

Thank you to all our participants and speakers.

Barr Leads the Charge on Legislation to Spur Investment in Equine Industry

Washington, D.C.— U.S. Congressman Andy Barr (KY-06) reintroduced legislation to incentivize investment in Kentucky’s signature equine industry.  The Equine Tax Fairness Act would make the three-year depreciation schedule permanent for racehorses, regardless of their age when put into service.  Currently, Congress must reauthorize this provision in the tax law on an annual basis. 

Additionally, this legislation would reduce the holding period for equine assets to be considered long term capital gains, putting them on a level playing field with other similar assets.  Congressman Barr’s bill is endorsed by the National Thoroughbred Racing Association (NTRA), the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association, the Jockey Club, the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association, Keeneland, and the American Horse Council.

AHC welcomes new Government Affairs Liaison – Mark Riso

AHC President, Julie Broadway, is pleased to announce the addition of Mark Riso to the AHC Team effective November 15th.
Mark is a public policy professional and national lobbyist, with over three decades of public policy – advocacy experience on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. – with an expertise in the legislative, regulatory, and political processes. Mark served as Legislative Director to two senior Members of Congress and as a professional staff member on the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations (U.S. House of Representatives, House Banking Committee). Following his work on Capitol Hill, Mark has served as a senior lobbyist for past twenty-five years for industry associations, and passionate about advocacy.

Horse Week Re-Releases Available

“Just like your passion for horses never fades, neither does Horse Week’s brilliant video content. That’s why The Equine Network is re-releasing your favorite Horse Week classics each week from now until Christmas!

The Horse Week re-releases will be streamed each Tuesday night, at 7pm ET. Head on over to horseweek.tv for a full video lineup. Tune in from the barn, office or comfort of your couch—Horse Week videos can be watched on any smart device by visiting horseweek.tv or the Equine Network YouTube channel. Once a video has been released, you will have until the week of Christmas to watch it as many times as you like for FREE!

Climate Change & the Equine Industry
Cliff Williamson, Director Health & Regulatory Affairs

Weather has always been an important variable to the operations of the horse industry, regardless of breed or activity.  But the horse industry is facing new and unique challenges in the form of unpredictable climate. Whether it is “climate change” in the fundamental sense caused by an increase in greenhouse gasses or simply a temporary shifting of weather patterns can be left to the scientists and politicians to debate.  But it is hard to disagree with the idea that “something is happening” with weather wherever you live. Most climate scientists believe that fundamental changes in weather may be the new norm.  Like all industries, the horse industry should be alert to potential changes and their harmful ramifications.  It may be that these changes are beyond our control, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be considered and prepared for.

Climate change is generally associated with drought, higher temperatures, swings in heat and cold, changes in rainfall, increases in extreme weather events, like hurricanes, tornadoes, and flooding, and stronger and more frequent storms. These changes have the potential to influence how the horse industry operates day-to-day.  Such changes can also have broader effects, such as a rise in invasive species, the movement of ticks and mosquitoes, the costs of feed and hay, and increasingly intense wildfires.

Persistent drought conditions in California have created annual wildfire situations that have not only posed a real threat to local citizens and their horses, but have also impacted air quality, event space availability and forage production resulting in cascading negative impacts for the region. The hurricanes that were once considered once in a lifetime events now occur with such consistancy that traditional naming practices had to be revisited. Particularly in the last decade, the number of significant climate events that have affected the equine industry has increased to such a degree that scores of organizations have felt the need to publish materials concerning the avoidance of, preparation for, and response to wildfires, blizzards, flooding, drought, extreme heat and extreme cold.

The equine industry serves as a critical player in the preservation and protection of green space in urban, suburban and rural areas. More than 80 million acres of open space is preserved for equestrian use according to the 2017 AHC Foundation Economic Impact Study. These spaces are capable of facilitating positive environmental efforts in their respective communities, as long as they are allowed to remain in place. Because of the unique methods in which horses are cared for in comparison to other livestock species, our impacts on water, air and soil quality are generally minimal, if not mitigated completely.

The equine industry not only needs to continue to be good stewards, it also needs to be proactive and prepare. The AHC recently offered a webinar on eco-friendly equestrian facility designs (see our website for that recording). We also are working to seek avenues for climate smart solutions to help our 80 million acres of equestrian lands in the US. As part of that effort, the AHC is encouraging the USDA to include the equine industry in their discussions with farmers, ranchers and rural communities so that together we can develop innovative climate-smart practices.

Tax Consideration for Charitable Contributions in Equine Industry

If a horse or other property is given as a charitable contribution, the donor may generally deduct the fair market value of the property. However, when property given to a charity would result in ordinary income to the donor if the property had been sold instead, the amount of the gift must be reduced by the amount of the ordinary income that would have been reported by the donor had the property been sold instead of donated. Also, if a horse that is eligible for capital gain treatment has been depreciated and is then donated to the charity, the amount of the gift is the value of the horse reduced by the amount of depreciation recapture. The deduction amount must also be reduced if gifted tangible personal property does not in some way relate to the purposes that give rise to the charity’s tax exemption

To read more go to : Tax Bulletins For Members – American Horse Council

United Horse Coalition (UHC), A Home For Every Horse (AHFEH) &

Purina mail out Fall 2021 Feed Coupons

We are delighted to announce that the fall mailing of feed coupons were shipped Tuesday, October 26th  to hundreds of deserving rescues across the US, reported Carly Barrick, AHFEH Program Coordinator.  “Thank you for the hard work you do for these deserving animals! ”

The United Horse Coalition is a proud partner with AHFEH and Purina to make this happen!

P.S. We love when you tag us in your posts so we can stay up to date on your hard work and successes. Remember to follow and tag @ahomeforeveryhorse on Instagram and Facebook!

CARLY BARRICK
Tier Program Coordinator |  Equine Network
A Home For Every Horse Manager | AHFEH
New Email: cbarrick@equinenetwork.com

 

IMG 0519 CC

MULE CROSSING: Joining Up With Equines

0

By Meredith Hodges

The first time I ever saw a horse, I was mesmerized by its beauty and the fluidity of its motion. Watching herds of horses on television as they galloped across the plains was like watching uniquely colored rainbows in motion. Their silky manes and tails floated behind them as they ran, and my heart soared with the promise of acquiring a sense of freedom like theirs. Their long, inviting backs beckoned me to ride!

No doubt, many have experienced the same sensation while watching horses. But how many of us ever believed that we could be trainers of such a wild and unconstrained beast? I thought that only the most macho of men could tame these animals, and their secrets would never be revealed to the common person. After all, these were special people with a special talent that I could never possess…they were the “Horse Whisperers.” So, I began my equine career riding horses that were already broke by someone else. It wasn’t until I was nineteen years old that I attempted to train my first horse. This two-year-old buckskin Arabian/Quarter Horse mare bucked me off before every ride, but she eventually became the dam of five of my very best mules.

I suspect that she bucked me off because I didn’t know what she needed from me to better perform. I avidly watched the horse trainers in action, read everything I could get my hands on, took clinics from trainers and drooled at the thought of ever riding as well as the horsemen of the Spanish Riding School of Vienna. I was crushed to discover that the school didn’t accept female riders.

Over the years, I was able to ride my horses in many equine activities, but my real equine education took place when I began to interact with mules and donkeys. They were the teachers that clarified my part in the equine experience. With every “Longears” interaction, I began to realize that I really could become a trainer—it was not some great mystery or talent that I would never possess. Even activities as simple as grooming or leading revealed the more intimate connections I could have with these amazing animals.

Mules have incredible strength due to the donkey influence that often leaves our most popular equine training techniques virtually ineffective when the approach is not to their liking. Their remarkable athletic ability and agility renders us helpless when we are unfairly insistent with them. It didn’t take long after my introduction to Longears before I realized that my approach to training needed to change drastically, but I was really surprised when they taught me that the way to cooperation between us was simply mutual respect, good manners, with a routinely consistent program that addressed their physical development. When this is done properly, it makes them feel good to be with you and they will actually choose to go with you over their stablemates…no herdbound problems anymore! It is a much easier approach in the long run.

Granted, we can get a mule, donkey or horse to “Join Up” in a round pen fairly quickly, but this does not always adequately address their correct physical development in good equine posture and it will still be a long road to finessed performance in any specific events. When we think of conditioning an equine’s muscles, we generally think more about bulk muscle development and not about core muscle development that supports good equine posture, allows more freedom of movement and promotes optimum functionality of internal organs. Equines that are properly physically conditioned, feel better all over and are much better able to perform the things that we ask of them. They do realize that you are the one responsible for their comfort.

True bonding is a lot more than just having them like you. True bonding is a real show of gratitude from your equine for being kind, considerate and thoughtful of his needs. Food rewards are not withheld, corrections for aggressive behaviors are handled quickly and fairly, and the equine should never be separated from his “friends”as a punishment. Isolation is not good for anyone and will only promote hostility. When you are thoughtful and kind in your approach, trust and cooperation are built and true bonding emerges.

Today, as an older and wiser equestrienne, it is my mission to share with others what Longears have taught me so they too can have a safe and satisfying relationship with the equines they love. What amazes me most? That having this kind of relationship with equines is really so simple. It just requires having the right attitude toward training and knowing what to do in an order that makes sense to the equine, an order that always has his best interests at heart. When you do, he will learn to trust and take good care of you in return.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2016, 2017, 2019, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

This Week’s eNews: TAKE ACTION to protect global burro populations!

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We wanted to share some recent updates about roundups, happy endings for rescued burros, and two actions you can take to help protect both wild horses and burros and global burro populations!

Help Ensure Congress’ Final Spending Bill Includes Funding for Fertility Control!

Recently, the Senate Appropriations Committee joined the House in allocating $11 million of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM)’s Wild Horse and Burro Program budget towards a comprehensive fertility control vaccine program for wild horses.

This was a huge victory, but our work is not over! Congress must now negotiate a final Fiscal Year 2022 spending bill, and we need your help to ensure that it includes this $11 million of dedicated funding for fertility control vaccines. This is a critical step toward curtailing the brutal helicopter roundups that are so costly to American taxpayers and the wild horses and burros we love.

TAKE ACTION

Help Stop the Donkey Skin Trade!

Each year, millions of donkeys are brutally slaughtered for the production of ejiao (eh-gee-yow), medicinal gelatin that is made from boiling the skins of these animals. The U.S. is the third largest importer of ejiao in the world. The donkey skin trade is now decimating global populations as well as harming the impoverished global communities that rely on them for survival.

Luckily, the Ejiao Act was recently introduced in Congress to ban the knowing sale or transportation of ejiao in all interstate or foreign trade. We need to speak up for all donkeys — including our federally protected wild burros! Please take a moment to ask your Representative to co-sponsor the Ejiao Act!

TAKE ACTION

Devil’s Garden Roundup Wrap-Up

The U.S. Forest Service ended its controversial roundup of wild horses from the Devil’s Garden Wild Horse Territory in California’s Modoc National Forest in October, resulting in the permanent removal of 506 horses. During the month-long operation, five horses died — a tragic fact that was unknown to the public until AWHC persisted in getting the information from the Forest Service.

In our most recent blog, AWHC looks at this disturbing situation and the Forest Service’s continued lack of transparency and intransigence in refusing to implement humane fertility control. Read the in-depth piece below.

READ MORE

 

Two Burros and Their Forever Home


Photo by Carol Lollis for the Daily Hampshire Gazette

Recently, AWHC’s Program Specialist Mary Koncel welcomed two adorable rescued burros, Huck and Puck, to her home in Massachusetts! Huck and Puck had a long journey, from the deserts of Nevada, to being adopted through the BLM’s Adoption Incentive Program, to a kill pen in Oklahoma, to finally getting the happy ending they deserve in Massachusetts! Read their story below.

READ MORE

Thanks for taking action!

— AWHC Team

 

CHILLY PEPPER – QUICK UPDATE – CORRECTED donation link and more horses need our help! Meet Starfire!

0

The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Quick Update – I apologize for the broken paypal link. They have “updated” their system.

Meet Starfire, one of the newest rescues. There are also two more who need us today.

I still need help with the vet bills in WA so I can get Coggins tests, health certs etc. on the latest group so they can travel. I need to head to NV at the end of the week to get Ricardo, (the new Donkey) and Rocket (the new Horse) with the horrible feet taken care of. The 22nd was the soonest we could get into the vet.

They will need x-rays and major farrier care. I am praying they can both survive this.

I need to add 2 more littles to the gang today.

The vet bills are still overwhelming. It seems like every time we pay them down, there is another emergency. (Sadly, this seems to be the normal for everyone in horse rescue).

Chilly Pepper needs help with vet bills, (current and impending), bail funds, fuel to get home to NV and funds to get the rest of the gang home before winter really sets in. I have to get everyone safely to NV prior to my surgery in December.

It’s that time of year when folks start thinking about taxes. What a beautiful way to save on your taxes by helping save lives.

Please think about donating to WIN dba Chilly Pepper if you need a tax donation credit.

Please check out the New Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
12965 Green Saddle Drive, #233
Golconda, NV 89414

checks to PO Box 233,

Golconda NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

CHILLY PEPPER – Current Rescue – UPDATED PHOTOS of these precious beings.

0

The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

There are no words. HOW can you do this to a living, breathing, oh so beautiful soul?

I wanted to share the updated photos I have. This beautiful little donkey has been abused for such a long time. I am literally crying as I write this. It made me physically ill when I saw the photos.

The beautiful geldgin(?) also has hooves that could be deadly if the coffin bone has rotated.

I just wanted you to see who we are trying to save in this current rescue. It literally is beyond heartbreaking.

I was hoping for a few days of quiet, but the calls keep coming. I know everyone, including ME, is so tired of all the emergencies. However, when God keeps putting these precious lives in front of me, I know I have to step up and do as much as we can. I NEVER go looking for horses, and sadly I have to say no to many.

Thank you as always. You have saved so many lives and ended the cruel suffering for so many others. YOU make the difference!

On a good note, the Catcher called and said they are pretty much shutting down until next spring. PTL for that one. Sadly there will still be constant domestics being dumped, but hopefully I will have time to heal from my surgery before being buried.

The truck is still broken, but being repaired. I have no idea how much that will cost. God has always blessed this rescue, and I know HE has this! Thank you for all you do!

Please check out the New Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
12965 Green Saddle Drive, #233
Golconda, NV 89414

checks to PO Box 233,

Golconda NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

Wormy Mama and her baby. THANK YOU for saving them!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

TWR2 3CC

MULE CROSSING: The Responsible Use of Restraints in Training

0

By Meredith Hodges

There is  a lot of discussion about training mules versus training horses. There are some who say that mules are harder to train than horses and others who say just the opposite. It has been my experience that it isn’t really that one animal is more “difficult” than the other. They each have their own redeeming qualities and individual limiting factors. The people who are dealing with them also have their own redeeming and limiting factors. For instance, if you are leading a horse and he does not wish to follow you, because he hasn’t the strength in his head and neck as a donkey or mule and can be more easily bullied into complying with a quick jerk on the lead rope.

On the other hand, if you are leading a mule or donkey, they can easily jerk the rope right out of your hands because of the incredible strength they have in their head and neck. When you teach a mule or donkey something one day, he will ponder what he has been taught during the days in between lessons.  He will comply more easily during the next lesson.  Regardless of how many days or weeks have passed between lessons, the horse will tend to forget and will need to be reminded where the mule or donkey will not.

It makes sense that the handler needs to adjust his training program such that the horse has more frequent and consistent lessons to refresh his memory. The mule will only need lessons as frequently as it takes to maintain good physical condition. When applying lessons more frequently, the handler has the ability to make subtle adjustments to get the best from the horse. If he wants the mule or donkey to react properly, it is critical that he teaches the mule or donkey correctly the first time as they will learn EXACTLY what the handler teaches and will continue to repeat it. The option of changing your approach during the training sequence is limited. What this all amounts to is that one is really not more easily trained than the other. Rather, it is the experience and knowledge of the handler or trainer that really makes the difference.

Mules and donkeys, sensitive and intelligent creatures that they are, seem to be more concerned about the overall attitude of the trainer than are horses. With the intelligent use of negative reinforcement, a positive attitude and informed use of restraints, modifying the behavior of any equine becomes a lot easier.

When mules do not comply with our wishes, you need to get first his attention and do something to temper his defensive attitude. When we are intelligent about a situation, it minimizes the animal’s negative reactive responses. Our politeness and consideration promote an overall positive attitude on both parts, and opens the lines of communication. Since these animals outweigh us by several hundred pounds, careful and informed use of restraints must sometimes be used to perpetuate the close relationship between you and your mule or donkey (and sometimes horses) in the training environment. Restraints should be used to help “explain” what you wish your mule to do, but should not be used as a perpetual training “crutch.” Intelligence, attitude and restraints should always be used in conjunction with a “path of least resistance” to promote successful training sessions.

If we realize that correct development of mind and muscle takes time, we can relax, let the animal learn at his own pace, utilize these helpful restraints to minimize resistance in difficult situations and actually enjoy the training process with our animals. For example, in the case of Draw Reins, they should only be used lightly in conjunction with your regular reins and only when necessary. In the beginning, this might mean at every stride. It is rather obvious how the Draw Reins can be phased out over time, but what about a restraint such as the Scotch Hobble, which is a seemingly inflexible restraint?

The first time you use the Scotch Hobble, you will probably have to secure the hind foot so that it cannot touch the ground. As your mule becomes quieter and more accepting of what you are doing, you can loosen the Scotch Hobble a little at each session. If your mule’s behavior is good, adjust the Scotch Hobble so that his toe rests on the ground. Next session, you might let him stand on all fours with the rope tied loosely into position, until he has complied to the point where the rope is actually around only the hind foot and is lying loosely on the ground. Naturally, if he becomes fidgety, just back up one step and tighten your connections on the rope.

There are many restraints available for use in the equine industry today: martingales, tie-downs, side reins, draw reins, hobbles and the list goes on. In my estimation, these restraints are being used much too freely as “crutches” and are responsible for terrible body posture and limited responsiveness among today’s equines. A restraint should be used only as a helpful tool to allow you to attain a certain positive response from the animal. Once you get the proper response, it is your responsibility to phase out the restraint in order to instill in your animal the correct behavior itself.

Early in a mule’s life, he should be taught to be calm in restraints, which makes daily tasks much easier. Your veterinarian and farrier will thank you and it may save your mule’s life if he should get caught in a fence, fall into a hole or encounter any other such potential for disaster. The goal is to teach him to think before he struggles or bolts and tries to run. Many Longears do this naturally, but it is always better to reinforce this pause for thought with lessons.

CAUTION: NEVER USE THE FACE TIE ON A HORSE.

The following technique is useful when working around very young mules, although it works on adults as well. You must remember to step back if your mule begins to struggle—give him space to learn the situation.

To use the Face Tie:

  1. Wrap your lead around the hitch rail once until your mule’s face is over the rail and held tight against it.
  2. Slip the rope through the noseband of the halter and around the hitch rail again and secure it. For a more secure tie (or to keep your mule sideways to the rail for vaccinations), you can run the rope through the throatlatch and around the hitch rail again.

Use the Face Tie to aid in clipping your mule’s bridle path and other light weekly trimming to prepare him for show clipping later on. It can also be used to teach a difficult mule or donkey to be bridled.

If your mule is difficult to lead, you can use a Quick Twist in your lead rope to give you more leverage. Twist a loop in the lead rope and bring it behind the noseband of the halter. Slip the loop around your mule’s nose and pull it snug. Pull on the lead until it is tight around his nose, and then just stand still, holding the tension in the lead rope until your mule steps forward. Do not keep pulling or jerking on the rope or he will become resistant and go backwards instead. By using the Quick Twist, when you ask him to come forward, you are not just pulling the halter—you have more leverage. Repeat as necessary.

NOTE: Do not tie your animal up while using a Quick Twist. Remove the quick twist and use the face tie if needed when tying.

To further perfect your equine’s Showmanship technique, you can also use a Lead Shank with a chain under the jaw, but always tie him with the lead rope only—never with the Lead Shank.

A soft, three-foot (one-meter) rope can be used to make a set of front leg hobbles. Leather hobbles are generally considered an “appointment” (equipment accessory), and are sometimes attached to the saddle when showing in Western classes. They are dangerous and not very effective because they can easily break. So if you have a need for hobbles, be sure to purchase those that are meant to be used on the equine’s legs and not those made of thin leather that are meant only as an equipment accessory for your saddle. Be careful with nylon hobbles as they can chafe the equine’s pasterns if they are not lined with a softer material.

Probably the most helpful restraint there is when it comes to mules and donkeys is the scotch hobble. This restraint helps to facilitate good ground manners and prevent kicking by restraining one hind foot, causing the mule to stand still while you work on him, whether it’s clipping or shoeing him, or saddling him for the first time. But, as with any restraint, you should keep in mind that it must be phased out sooner or later. The first time a restraint is used, it will usually have to be used in its full capacity to get the desired response.

To make the 15-foot (5-meter) scotch hobble:

  1. Tie a nonslip knot around your mule’s neck.
  2. Take the excess rope down to the hind foot and around the pastern, then back up through the neck loop and back around the pastern a second time.
  3. Pull the rope just tight enough so that your mule must stand on his other three feet for balance.
  4. Wrap the excess around the ropes going to the foot and back up to the loop around the neck.
  5. Tie with a quick-release knot. By wrapping the ropes going to the foot, you prevent the foot from slipping loose.

The first time you use the scotch hobble, you will probably have to secure the hind leg so it cannot touch the ground. As your mule becomes quiet and accepting, you should loosen the hobble a little each time until you are not really using it at all. This is called “phasing (or fading) out the restraint.”

When he has learned to stand calmly in a scotch hobble, you can use a twisted lead rope (with no snap) in a figure eight to hobble his front legs with a safety knot. The same lead rope can be used to tie up one front leg by wrapping the rope around the bent leg, forcing the mule to keep all his weight on the other three legs. This type of hobbling is particularly useful when clipping the hair on the front legs of a mule. As you work on the leg that is not hobbled, your mule will quickly learn that with the other leg ties up, it is to his advantage not to try not to move the leg you are clipping.

On a difficult mule, you may have to use the twisted lead rope in conjunction with the scotch hobble. Adjust the scotch hobble so only your mule’s toe touches the ground for balance, but not enough to bear weight. Once he is accustomed to this restraint, you can safely put him in sheepskin-lined chain hobbles.

Do not use nylon hobbles—they can cause severe rope burns if they are not lined with a soft material! Leather hobbles are fine as long as they are intended for restraint use and not just as a saddle accessory. Now you can think about taking your mule into the high country, hobbling him and turning him loose to graze while you set up camp. You should be able to find and catch him the next morning, because mules generally do not wander far from their “families.” But keep in mind that mules are very smart and can quickly learn to hop along while hobbled. Also, if you have a horse with you that likes to wander, be sure to tie him up because mules will follow horses.

Choosing the right restraint for a given situation takes thought and consideration. You must ask yourself, which restraints are available to me? Which restraint will most likely bring about the response I desire from my mule? Will the response with this restraint come with little or no resistance and is it humane? Will it cause other more serious problems in the animal? And finally, can the restraint be phased out relatively easily?

Keeping these things in mind when using restraints will help to keep the relationship with your mule from becoming a battleground. Bear in mind that whichever restraint you use might vary from situation to situation and from animal to animal, so carefully consider your options. Remember, using intelligence, a good attitude and an informed use of restraints can greatly enhance your training experience together.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1989, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tell the BLM’s new Director to prioritize wild horse protections

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) recently confirmed its newest Director, Tracy Stone-Manning. We welcome Director Stone-Manning, as she comes in at a pivotal moment for the BLM.

With the New York Times report earlier this year, fueled by research conducted by AWHC, we revealed the wild horse-to-slaughter pipeline that has come to exist as a result of the BLM’s failed Adoption Incentive Program (AIP). Since the report, members of the public and Congress have called for reforms and an end to the program.

Today, we’re taking things a step further. With new leadership, the BLM has the opportunity to reform the programs that have failed America’s wild horses and burros for the last fifty years.

We welcome Director Stone-Manning, but we also call for necessary reforms to the BLM’s mismanaged Wild Horse & Burro Program. Join us in calling for these important reforms to protect wild horses and burros. >>

TAKE ACTION

Right now, thousands of wild horses are being rounded up across 3.4 million acres of land in Wyoming. And for Fiscal Year 2022, the House and Senate appropriations committees gave the BLM a budget increase towards their helicopter roundup programs. Change for America’s wild horses and burros is dire and needed now.

We’re calling on Director Stone-Manning to:

  • Put an end to the cash-incentive Adoption Incentive Program that’s sending truckloads of wild horses and burros into the slaughter pipeline.
  • Redirect resources away from inhumane and costly roundups toward scientific, on-range management with fertility control vaccines that allow horses to stay in the wild where they belong.
  • Address the bias in resource allocation for commercial livestock grazing within wild horse and burro habitats.
  • Bring accountability and compliance to roundups by requiring cameras on helicopters, traps, and holding pens during roundups.
  • Provide meaningful public observation of roundup operations.
  • Strengthen the agency’s Comprehensive Animal Welfare Program guidelines and make them enforceable.

Will you join us in calling on Director Stone-Manning to enact these necessary reforms for America’s wild horses and burros today?

TAKE ACTION

Thank you for your continued support of wild horses and burros.

American Wild Horse Campaign

IT NEVER STOPS! Today’s 911 – An emergency call for a Donkey and a Horse with Horrific Feet! Can we save them?

0

The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

There are no words. These poor souls need help now.

Will you help me save them? Sadly the Donkey’s hoofers are beyond bad. I will need the usual to help save them, and you can be sure Donk will need to go to the vet as soon as I can get him/her in.

Please help once again. The black legs belong to a horse, but I have no photos of him yet. I am told neither of them can move much. Let’s end this suffering.

Below are the mare and baby you just saved! Her hoofers are really bad, but nothing compared to the new ones we need to pull.

Please help now so I can get these guys whatever they need. I still owe over $1000 to Harrah Vet, (the new mare needs her Coggins), and the bill at Goldendale is probably close to $2,000 or more from the last group.

I need to try & pay those before I get Donkey in and there is zero time to waste.

Thank you as always. You have saved so many lives and ended the cruel suffering for so many others. YOU make the difference!

On a good note, the Catcher called and said they are pretty much shutting down until next spring. PTL for that one. Sadly there will still be constant domestics being dumped, but hopefully I will have time to heal from my surgery before being buried.

The truck is still broken, but being repaired. I have no idea how much that will cost. God has always blessed this rescue, and I know HE has this! Thank you for all you do!

Please check out the New Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
12965 Green Saddle Drive, #233
Golconda, NV 89414

checks to PO Box 233,

Golconda NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

Wormy Mama and her baby. THANK YOU for saving them!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

IMG 4440CC 1

MULE CROSSING: The Road to Success with your Mule!

1

By Meredith Hodges

When equines are trained in a logical, consistent and respectful way beginning with detailed lead line training, even “cycling females” is not a problem. Appropriate lessons need to have a logical beginning and be taught in a sequential fashion. The logical beginning in any athletic conditioning program should be to strengthen the core muscles that support bony columns. The length of the lesson and order in which lessons are presented facilitate strength and balance at the core. Adequate length of each stage of training and the way the lessons are delivered instill a sense of security, confidence and trust in the handler that cements the relationship and become part of the equine’s automatic behavior.

Think of it in terms of teaching children. Children have difficulty learning and paying attention when they have not been eating in a healthy way or exercising properly, when the teacher is unclear in their delivery and the material does not flow together easily, when the teacher moves along too quickly, when there is too much repetition and when they have to stay in one position too long. When the teacher is more aware of the elements of learning, delivers the information in a logical and sequential manner with attention to mental and physical health, and provides solutions, the students will thrive!

We are often in too big of a hurry to ride and do not spend enough time at the lower-level stages of training. We don’t understand the implications of moving along too fast because these animals are so much larger than we are that we can’t imagine that they would have strength, balance and coordination issues that would be counter-productive to our expectations.

How could we even know? There are multiple trainers out there who believe that an equine can be ready to ride in 60-90 days. This is highly publicized and does not afford the average person to think any further than just being able to ride. However, if you ask yourself if you could be ready for a 25-mile marathon in 60-90 days, then the picture starts to become clear…there is much more to think about and it takes much longer to be ready for such activities. You cannot strengthen muscles, balance the body and instill body awareness adequately in this short period of time, and core muscle strength might not be addressed at all!

Leading training is not just teaching to follow and many people spend too little time on leading training. In leading training, the equine gets the benefit of isometric-type exercises that strengthen the muscles closest to the bone while you work on forward and backward straight lines, smooth arcs through the turns and square halts, all facilitating good balance and proprioception (body awareness). This promotes good core muscle strength that will enable your equine to move to the round pen stage of training and do remarkably well because he won’t be fighting his own awkwardness and lack of balance while trying to balance on the circle at all three gaits.

This kind of training requires that you really pay attention to your own good posture and execution of the tasks in leading training. You must be consciously aware of your own posture. Stand straight and tall, holding the lead in your left hand while using the right to keep the animal at your shoulder, not too far forward, not crowding you and not too far back. Wear your fanny pack full of crimped oats (the reward) to keep your equine interested in staying at your shoulder and not lagging behind.

When you walk, make sure your legs are following the movement of their front legs, stepping forward with your corresponding feet and not stepping any further forward than they do. When you stop, stop with your own feet  together (in a balanced fashion), turn and face the equine’s shoulder and square up his feet every single time you stop. This causes the equine to be conscious about balancing weight over all four feet evenly that will result in the balance becoming steadier as the task demands and speed increases.

You can tell your equine is ready to move from the flatwork leading training to the obstacle leading training when you can throw the lead over his neck and you receive his compliance though all he has learned without you touching him. Next, we add the element of coordination during lead line training over obstacles. The first task of lead line obstacle training would be to introduce the obstacles and ask for reasonable negotiation of the obstacle to instill confidence in the equine and trust in you. The second stage would be to break the obstacles down into smaller steps to manipulate coordination and balance and to instill adequate self carriage through the obstacles.

Taking time to do these exercises correctly at the walk and trot on the lead line will help immensely before the equine goes to round pen training where the exercises become more active and demanding. The core base from which the animal must work will be much stronger and he will be better able to stay erect and bend through his rib cage on the circle in the round pen instead of leaning like a motorcycle.

When we finally do graduate to the round pen, it will become important to maintain good equine posture and balance. When equines are allowed to run freely in the round pen, they naturally get excited and want to hollow their neck and back. This is why we employ the self-correcting device I call the “Elbow Pull.” There are separate ways to adjust this, one is for horses and one is for mules and donkeys. More details about this and leading training can be found in my manual and DVD combo, “Equus Revisited.

By the time you finally do ride, your equine will not only be strong, balanced and coordinated enough to do more complicated activities, but if you are unbalanced at all, he will be better able to cope with that as well. This is particularly important with cycling females as they already have a marginal, but normal amount of aches and pains while they cycle. If they are to maintain a good attitude and good balance with a rider, they need good core muscle strength, so they can overcome the normal menstrual aches and pains and deal with the rider in a reasonable way. They will also be more mentally and emotionally tuned into you and less likely to become disengaged. It is my observation that most disobedience is due to a lack of balance whether it is mental, emotional or physical.

With good core muscle strength, even cycling females will be better able to perform to their full potential at the time when you lower your expectations. The level of their mediocre performance will still be higher than most of their competitors. Equine mares are difficult enough, but jennets and mollies that are not trained in this logical way will be distracted, tune you out when they are cycling and revert to their instinctual behaviors like squatting, peeing, clacking their teeth and they will remain “on alert!” This can cause a lot of problems for the handler.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2010, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.

What a night!!

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

To everyone who attended our annual Stay Wild virtual fundraiser last night, I wanted to say thank you so much for your generosity and compassion. The support we received will surely help us continue to save the lives of America’s wild horses and burros.

We set a goal to raise $180,000 through last night’s event, and I’m excited to share that so far, we have raised a total of $150,016. While this is a major achievement, we still have a few areas where your support is greatly needed! Can you help us hit our $180,000 goal before midnight tonight?

We set a goal last night to raise $11,000 towards our Field Programs. $11,000 helps us administer 367 doses of the PZP fertility control vaccine to wild mares in Nevada and keeps our field team supplied for two months on the Virginia Range! 

Help us humanely manage wild horse populations and keep wild horses in the wild where they belong by contributing toward our $11,000 goal today!

DONATE TO OUR FIELD PROGRAMS

We also set a goal to raise $10,000 for our Legal Fund. $10,000 provides us the necessary resources to fuel our next lawsuit — and we have a few in the pipeline! 

Just this year, we’ve filed suit against the disastrous Adoption Incentive Program (AIP), stopped the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) from performing dangerous surgical sterilization procedures on wild mares, and we’re working on a rulemaking petition with a prestigious university to strengthen and make the BLM’s Comprehensive Animal Welfare Program enforceable!

Right now, we are $2,860 of the way to our $10,000 goal — can you chip in now to fuel our Legal Fund?

DONATE TO OUR LEGAL FUND

We also set a very important goal to raise $25,000 towards our Rescue Fund, and while we have successfully secured $11,910 towards our rescue efforts, we still have a ways to go if we want to hit our goal! 

This may seem like a big goal, but every $8,000 helps us bail approximately 10 wild horses and burros from kill pens and every $500 helps us provide the necessary medical supplies to care for and treat orphaned and injured foals on Nevada’s Virginia Range. Will you help us hit our $25,000 goal so we can fuel our rescue efforts?

DONATE TO OUR RESCUE FUND

Last night’s journey through the history of America’s wild horse and burro protection movement was truly something to remember. From Wild Horse Annie’s fight to protect these cherished icons in the ‘70s to the work we’re doing today — we’re so grateful to have you along for the ride with us.

From musical guest performances to sobering behind-the-scenes footage of the atrocities of the AIP and our fight to terminate it, I won’t be forgetting last night anytime soon.

To our sponsors and silent auction participants, to our staff and board, to the amazing talent and our wonderful host committee: thank you … we couldn’t have done it without you! THANK YOU also to everyone who attended and donated — you made this year’s Stay Wild one for the books!

Now let’s keep the good work going!!

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director 
American Wild Horse Campaign

P.S. Our Silent Auction is still live until MIDNIGHT TONIGHT. If you haven’t yet had a chance to bid on one of these very special items, you can do so at the link here! 

TT49 FreeLunging Slideshow

LTR Training Tip #49: Free Lunging in the Round Pen

0

Introduce your equine to lunging training with “free lunging” without tack or equipment in the round pen.

Download Detailed Description

See more Training Tips

Please help! QUICK 911 FOR TODAY – Skinny, wormy mare with horrible feet and a 3 month old baby. She LEAVES today ONE WAY OR THE OTHER? 1

0

The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

I received an URGENT 911 this morning. This is mare is leaving the property today, and if I don’t got get her, well, we all know the other option.

Once again Chilly Pepper has to clean up another mess.

She looks pregnant, but is slowly starving due to her worm load and neglect. She has a 3-4 month old baby who needs saved as well.

Please help make this happen. Her feet are horrible and causing pain in her legs and spine. With some TLC she should have a wonderful life, but she has to be saved today.

She is still basically wild.

Below is one of our littles. Abby Sue had a horrific shoulder injury and Doc said it appears to be broken (healing). She is one of the lucky ones because hopefully, she will have a chance at a bright future.

The truck is still broken, but God has always blessed this rescue, and I know HE has this! Thank you for all you do!

Please check out the New Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
12965 Green Saddle Drive, #233
Golconda, NV 89414

checks to PO Box 233,

Golconda NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Page 1 of 212»