Monthly Archive for: ‘July, 2019’

Head West for your next summer read

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We know how much our western-roaming mustangs mean to you and we thank you for your unwavering support in our mission to preserve wild horses on public lands.

That’s why we’re excited to share with you our news about the ebook, Tales From Big Country.

35% of proceeds directly fund AWHC for our work to preserve America’s wild horses.

Tales From Big Country features a 13-story collection by international bestselling and award-winning authors whose works have been published in USA Today and the Wall Street Journal. From the big skies of Montana to perilous rides with the Texas Rangers, you’ll read tales of civilization in the lawless frontier, stories of Native Americans, fables of romance, horror, and everything under the sun.

Pre-order your ebook* today for just .99 cents and on August 14th it will be delivered to your iPad of Kindle!

Thanks for your support!

The AWHC Team

Buy Now

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MULE CROSSING: Making History with Mules Part 1

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By Meredith Hodges

Many people ask me when the first mules appeared on this earth. Historically, mules have their roots in the Bible. Contrary to the popular belief that mules are so lowly and stubborn that they would have to be the mount of serfs, they were—in the beginning—the mount of kings!

“So Zadok the priest, and Nathan the prophet, and Benaiah the son of Jehoiada and the Cherethites, and the Pelethites, went down and caused Solomon to ride upon king David’s mule, and brought him to Gihon.” (I Kings 1:38)

Another Bible passage recounts how Absolom, the son of King David, had a rather unfortunate encounter in which he was clunked on the head by a tree branch while his mule, using common sense, ducked underneath. Those of us who know and love mules can certainly relate to their ability to instill humility in their human counterparts, and everyone can appreciate that, even back then, mules were noted for their completely natural and indubitable humor.

“And Absolom met the servants of David. And Absolom rode upon a mule, and the mule went under the thick boughs of a great oak, and his head caught hold of the oak, and he was taken up between the Heavens and the earth, and the mule that was under him went away.” (II Samuel 18:9)

Mules are not only psycho-therapists, but they are the true geniuses of slap-stick humor! When you get into an altercation with a mule, you will seldom get hurt, but you will surely be set straight in a most humiliating way.

“And when the ass saw the angel of the Lord, she fell down under Balaam and Balaam’s anger was kindled, and he smote the ass with a staff. And the Lord opened the mouth of the ass, and she said unto Balaam, ‘What have I done unto thee, that thou hast smitten me these three times?’ And Balaam said unto the ass, ‘Because thou hast mocked me, I would there were a sword in mine hand, for now would I kill thee.’ And the ass said unto Balaam, ‘Am not I thine ass, upon which thou hast ridden ever since I was thine unto this day? Was I ever wont to do so unto thee?’ And he said, ‘Nay.” (Numbers 22:23) Mules and donkeys will always be compelled to let us know when our actions are careless and thoughtless—it is in their nature. Whether or not we choose to listen and alter our approach is entirely up to us.

The highest intelligence residing in animals is that of the mule. He inherits athletic ability and “horse sense” from his mother, the horse, and incredible wisdom and strength from his father, the jack. Perhaps the kings of yore finally tired of being publicly humiliated by their superior mules, or perhaps they just couldn’t muster the patience or humor to deal with them anymore, but mules were eventually replaced by horses as the mount of choice, and were subsequently used primarily for packing and draft work.

Strong and durable animals, mules also played a significant part in Greek and Roman transportation. The mule can travel more than three mph and can easily cover 50 miles in a day. Their usefulness is unmatched, even by oxen, as they can cover more distance much more quickly.

The mule’s ability to survive is truly uncanny, given that he is the hybrid offspring of a jack and a mare and does not produce offspring. On rare occasions, mare mules (or mollies) have been known to reproduce by a jack or stallion, but for the most part, mules are sterile and cannot propagate themselves.

There is a volunteer organization in Israel called HAI-BAR, (an Israeli word meaning “wildlife”). This organization was established to protect animals that had thrived in the Holy Land during the Old Testament years, but that are now dangerously close to extinction, due to reckless use of land resources. HAI-BAR South, established in 1964, opened 3000 acres to the general public in 1977 for the express purpose of protecting herds of wild species from Biblical times. A second reserve, HAI-BAR Carmel, was established in the center of Israel near Haifa on Mount Carmel, where 2000 acres were fenced off to accommodate and protect even more Biblical animals. These reserves are still in operation today.

The closest ancestral link to the mule is the Somali Wild Ass, found in Northeast Africa. Only a few were still living in the Danakil Desert of Ethiopia when a number of them were captured and brought to HAI-BAR, where they began to once again propagate. The Somali Wild Ass has incredible strength for its size and subsists on desert shrubs as its only food. This explains why our modern-day mules and donkeys can stay healthy and strong on much less feed than today’s horse requires.

The unique personality traits of the mule come from the ass. Unlike horses, mules are naturally curious, but are also suspicious and require time to size up a situation before acting. For this reason, it usually takes time for people to warm up to mules and time for mules to warm up to people. Because their judgment of people is unmatched, it is wise when buying a mule to allow him to pick you! A lot of the mule’s so-called“stubbornness” is really a sense of self-preservation. If he has a negative experience, he is not likely to repeat it. His memory serves him well and he never makes the same mistake twice. For this reason, it is important that the personality of the mule and his handler are compatible and that they actually like each other.

The old myths, “stubborn as a mule,” and, “a mule will wait for the opportunity for revenge” are just those…myths. I would suppose these opinions arose from those who were probably impatient when dealing with mules. When left to their own devices, mules will learn from their experienced peers and from those who truly care about them. And people who are confrontational with mules will meet with undeniable stubbornness and resistance.

It makes sense that mules and donkeys have become so economically important to Third World countries. They are generally sedate, humble and hard working animals with an intelligence that enables them to learn their job quickly. They can go anywhere man can go, and do the work of many at far less expense—which is more than can be said of any motorized vehicle. Mules and donkeys are still an important part of third world economies. There are educators from The Donkey Sanctuary in Great Britain and other sanctuaries who visit these emerging countries, with the expressed purpose of teaching people how to work more efficiently with their longeared counterparts, since the very existence of many third world nations depends upon this partnership.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2010, 2011, 2015, 2016, 2020 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.

Our next deadline

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Here’s your latest wild horse status report.

With the dust barely settled after the Triple B roundup last week, we’re headed to the Pine Nut wild horse roundup in Nevada on Monday.

As I write this, tens of thousands of wild horses stand in government holding facilities, and we wait with bated breath for the BLM’s decision on whether or not it will proceed with gruesome sterilization experiments on wild mares.

With tactical lawsuits, advocacy on the Hill, implementation of humane fertility control, and documentation in the wild, we continue with crucial actions to make roundups a thing of the past. That’s why, last week, we extended our fundraising goal to $100,000 to fight these cruel stampedes.

Your donation today will help us gear up for the next fights to protect wild horses on Monday – and save more of these beautiful creatures from suffering the same cruel fate we’re witnessing now.

Here are some of the actions we take to end roundups:

  • With field representation and filmmakers on the ground at each roundup, we’re gathering footage for educational videos to share with the public and lawmakers.
  • On Capitol Hill, our legal team is educating key members of Congress to combat a dangerous plan to round up and remove up to 130,000 wild horses over the next 10 years. (That’s more than exist on the range today.)
  • With litigation funding, we’re building specific cases for roundup-related lawsuits — like our case to save wild horses near Caliente, Nevada where BLM is planning to remove 100% of the herds.

Donate today to take action with us. Your support is key as we continue asserting to stand as the last line of defense between our wild horses and burros and the corporate livestock industry that seeks their destruction.

Thank you for standing with us,

Suzanne

2nd Chance Auction is Live!!!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

Thank you for helping horses!
It’s been incredibly busy the last few months.
We wrapped up our Boots and Bling event, and we’re so grateful to everyone that volunteered, donated, purchased tickets, attended, bid on auction items, and supported the event in every way.  Thanks to  your support, we sold out (over 400 tickets), and with immense gratitude for the folks at the Western States Horse Expo, we had a fun-filled event at the fabulous Murieta Equestrian Center.  With your support, we raised approximately $55,000 to support AAE operations and assure ongoing rescue activities!
Though our Boots event is a big boost to our budget, the calls for help with horses never ends, and sadly, neither does the need for fundraising.
For those of you that were unable to attend Boots (and those that attended, too), we had some auction items that were not bid on, and we thought it would be fun to have a second chance auction, online….a second chance for items to be won, a second chance for you to win, and another chance for you to keep helping horses!  We’ve added some cool new items, too.
We have a series of auctions lined up, so visit often and share broadly!
All About Equine’s Second Chance Auction is live on our Facebook page.  Like our horses, these items are in need of a new home and a second chance!
We hope to will find something you can’t live without, so help the horses by bidding!  All the proceeds from the online auction go directly to care for horses and ongoing operations at AAE!
We are so grateful to all of our donors for providing AAE with these items to feature!
THANK YOU for your continued support!
Our current 2nd Chance Online Auction is open!  
 
Bidding closes at 1pm PST on July 31, 2019
 
Featured Items
 
Pink Tourmaline and Pink Turquoise Earrings set in sterling silver.
These are a rare find!!
Value: $250 
Starting Bid:  $100
Thank you, Talisman Collection Fine Jewelers, for donating these beautiful earrings!
New San Francisco 49ers Hall of Fame football. This football has never been inflated. Football comes with Certificate of Authenticity issued by the San Francisco 49ers.
Numbered 108 of 1000.
Value: Priceless
Starting Bid: $25
Thank you, San Francisco 49ers, for such a cool gift!
Lightweight and easy to maneuver this 8 foot boat features heavy duty pontoons, aluminum oars, oar locks, temperature resistant bladders, and a powder coated steel tube frame. Special features include an under-seat stripping apron, zippered armrest pockets, a rear storage platform, molded plastic fold-down seat, and adjustable foot rests. Designed to hold up to 350 lbs of weight, this boat has a Class 1 river rating. Roanoke assembled size: 96″L x 55″W x 29″H, Weight: 43 lbs Used only once. Looks New!
Value: $250
Current Bid:  $140
Thank you, Gaylon & Alayne B!
Enjoy a steaming hot cup of hot cocoa in these two (2) cute oversized mugs and matching serving plate. Includes four (4) hot cocoa mixes, a box of caramel stroopwafels, scone mix, cocoa flavored cookies and raspberry panna cotta signature chocolates.
A chocolate lover’s dream!
Value: $50
Starting Bid:  $25
Thank you, Lori R, for donating this yummy basket!
New in box candy dispenser from Lefonte.
Features a glass globe and a 2lb. bag of M&M Chocolates.
Value: $35
Current Bid:  $25
Thank you, Judy G, for such a sweet gift!
New in box!  6 foot Grandfather Clock. Oak color finish.
Features Key wind function, special moon phase accents, and
classic European traditional strike chime.
Value: $200
Starting Bid:  $50
Thank you, John G for this gift of time!

ADOPTABLE HORSES

 
We have several new horses we’ll be sharing soon.  In the meantime, if you have room in your heart and home, please check out our horses looking for homes.
Visit our website to see who’s available.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED NOW!!

 
Do you have four hours a week to give to support horses in need?
Daily Horse Care, especially pm shifts needed now
(Daily 8a-12p or 3p-6p)
Used Tack Store Support, all areas 
(Fri – Mon, 12-4p)
Barn/Facility Maintenance
Foster Homes, Long-Term Foster/Sanctuary Homes
Capital Campaign Support
Board Members
Fundraising/Events
Grants – Writing and Research
Volunteer, Project, and Activity Coordinators
Outreach Activities
Youth Programs
Therapy Programs
Veteran Programs
Special Projects
Admin Support
Marketing
Graphics
Social Media
Bloggers
Photographers
Media and/or Photo Librarian
More, more, more
Interested in volunteering or volunteering in other areas?

Employers Match Donations, Does Yours?

Hey volunteers!
Did you know YOU could earn grant money for AAE from your employer just by volunteering?
Many Employers offer money when their employees volunteer.  Here are a few examples:
  • Intel

    provides a $10 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $5,000 per employee or retiree.

  • Microsoft provides a $17 grant to a nonprofit per every hour volunteered by an employee.
  • Apple provides a $25 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $10,000 per employee.
  • Verizon provides a $750 grant to a nonprofit when an employee volunteers for 50+ hours.
  • State Farm provides a $500 grant nonprofit when an employee volunteers for+ 40 hours.
  • Others top 20 matching gift and/or volunteer grant companies include
    • Starbucks 
    • CarMax
    • Home Depot 
    • JP Morgan
    • Chevron
    • Soros Fund Management 
    • BP (British Petroleum)
    • Gap Corporation
    • State Street Corporation 
    • ExxonMobil
    • Johnson & Johnson
    • Boeing
    • Disney
    • Google
    • Merck
    • Aetna
    • Dell
    • Outerwall (CoinStar and RedBox) 
    • ConocoPhillips
    • RealNetworks
    • Time Warner and subsidiaries
    • AllState
    • and more
Check with your employer.  You could help purchase our next load of hay!

ANOTHER URGENT CALL – SUFFERING ENDED, AND 4 MORE BABIES AT THE SHIPPER’S

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Another call for 4 more babies, and maybe more. At least this one is not a 24 hour deadline. Pickup could be in a day, or a week, or even longer. Luckily the Shipper does not have a full load right now. So every day is a gift for these poor babies. Sadly, we have no option to save the moms. But we need to raise funds to secure the safety and rescue of these little babies.

We deal with so much heartbreak it is beyond comprehension. It drains you to the point of almost not being able to function. I know this is God’s rescue and He puts this all in front of us. So I am supposed to be able to handle it :( We run on so much faith, and He does always provide, even when we are down to pennies, but it takes every last thing.

THANK YOU so very much for making the last rescue possible. The mare’s leg was horribly broken. When she stepped out of the trailer she fell down, so she was humanely euthanized within hours. It of course was extra spendy, but it had to be done. THANK YOU for giving her the respect she deserved, and the gift of an end to her pain. The other gelding is now in his forever home. He may or may not have a long life, but his teeth were fixed so his horrible pain has also ended. The vet said the cancer is not painful, so he will live out his days in peace, surrounded by love. The orphans were also picked up and are home safe.

We were called on a beautiful little filly from Nevada, named Tyla. She had been caught in the middle of a stallion fight and had been laying there for hours. Everyone came together and we picked her up.

She was in horrible shape, and we took her to the vet on our way home. I also consulted our vet in CA. She is a foal specialist and is one of the best vets out there. Both of my “excellent” vets had exactly the same treatment plan. However, even with proper meds, the damage to her spine was too much and she let us know she was done. Her pain was getting worse and worse and her spinal injury was not improving.

Sadly, we had to set her free from her pain and this world. The only good thing was that for once, EVERY person in her life DID THE RIGHT THING FOR HER. If caring folks had not taken the time to make sure she was rescued, she would have literally been eaten alive on the range, as she was paralyzed when she was lying down. (She could literally only move her head and neck.) Another heartbreak for us, but a beautiful gift for an amazingly beautiful little baby. She couldn’t stay lying down, even when we helped her down. Her pain was too much.

She would stand beside my bed for literally hours, with her nose mushed into my tummy and sleep. We spent nearly 24/7 with her, but even with the best care, she never had a chance. When a baby wants to fight, and there is even the slightest chance of getting better, we will always fight with them. But that moment they tell you they are done, we have to honor and respect that, no matter how painful it is for us. That is true rescue. Always doing what is best for the critter in front of you.

So we have lots of vet bills again, and our milk and rescue funds have been depleted. We are getting ready for the new kids, and praying there will only be 4. However we all know that can change in a minute. So once again, we need your help now!

Y’all are amazing, and YOU HAVE SAVED SO MANY LIVES! Thank you for always being there for the horses.

Thank you as always, for your amazing love and support. We treasure all our Chilly Pepper Family and appreciate the fact that YOU MAKE THIS ALL POSSIBLE! We will keep on fighting as long as we have the funds to make it happen, even though on days like today it is simply too much. :(

Below – Honey Bandit and Lucky. 2 of the amazing lives that y’all have saved!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

https://www.gofundme.com/f/save-orphan-foals-amp-horses-from-slaughter?

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Just fyi – young mule

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The following is from Stroud Oklahoma Kill Pen Horses:

Thank you for reading our flyer. Please share if you can.

hank you – shannon Ross

Shannon M. Ross
Certified Shorthand Reporter, No. 8916

In photos: Why we fight for 🐴🐴🐴

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

It’s hard to fathom the shocking reality of roundups unless you’ve witnessed one. Helicopters stampeding terrified herds across public lands in the brutal summer heat. Foals separated from their mothers, often dropping to the ground due to exhaustion. Crowded pens pulsing with masses of wild horses, trapped within.

When the Triple B wild horse roundup concluded last week, 802 horses were captured. Fourteen wild horses died.

That’s why we work hard to keep representatives in the field — present for every roundup — so we can document the stampede and keep you informed, as gut-wrenching as it truly is.

Below are images and videos we captured of the recent Triple B roundup.

We are in court, in Congress, and on the range fighting to keep wild horses in the wild. Will you make a contribution to AWHC right now so we have the resources to keep up the fight?

This documentation demonstrates greed and cruelty, a reality in which private ranchers and commercial interests dictate what happens to your wild horses roaming your public land.

Donate today to fund our field representation so we can keep you informed and strengthen our case against the Bureau of Land Management.

Until roundups cease, these wild horses and thousands more across the West await an uncertain fate. Until then, our work continues.

– The AWHC Team

Donate

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MULE CROSSING: Getting Down with Minis, Part 5

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By Meredith Hodges

In Part 1 of Getting Down with Minis, you learned how to begin the relationship with your miniature equine in a positive and natural way that fosters good behavior and a solid relationship between you. You also learned the importance of getting down to your mini’s eye level so that he can make eye contact with you, which discourages striking, jumping on you and other bad behaviors that are common when working with miniature equines. In Part 2, I discussed how important it is to successfully complete the tasks in Part 1 before moving on to Part 2 and explained why it is advisable to work minis in groups, as they perform better when they are with their friends. You also learned how to train minis to go over and around various obstacles. Remember that all of this is to be done with no expectations that may overwhelm your mini—it is better if you maintain an attitude of fun and games. In Part 3, we got down to some serious groundwork training so your mini can be used for the purpose of driving and showing in hand. He learned to lunge and to be ground driven in the round pen and in the open arena through the hourglass pattern and if part of a team, how to do these things as a team. In Part 4, you worked on obstacle exercises on the drive lines to increase strength and coordination.

The fifth and final part of this series will illustrate how you can keep things controlled and will help you to consistently set up an environment for success. NOTE: If you are training two minis, it is really just a matter of teaching each of them the same thing, but at each stage of the ground-driving and hitched lessons, you need to teach each mini separately first and then as a team.

These exercises will require an assistant, so ask someone you trust to help you. Make sure, each step of the way, that you tell your assistant clearly and specifically exactly what you need him or her to do. To begin, take your mini back to the round pen and review your previous ground-driving lessons (“walk,” “trot,” “whoa” and “back”) with an “S” turn through the middle in order to change directions. NOTE: Do not use the “reverse” command during these lessons. Do use the “back” command, but only to loosen the traces when detaching your mini from the tire. Attach a tire to the harness traces as a drag so your mini can get used to pulling weight behind him. To do this, first thread some baling twine through the slits at the ends of your traces to create “loops.” The slits in the traces are usually too narrow to allow a line to slide freely back and forth through them, but the baling twine will work well to accommodate this.

Next, take a piece of flat nylon stripping such as a strip of lunge line and tie it to a tire with about six to eight feet of extra line. This extra line will be threaded through the baling twine loops and then be handed back into the hands of your assistant. Now ask your assistant to walk alongside and slightly behind you, holding on to the piece of nylon stripping as you ground drive your mini. Always make sure your assistant is walking on the side away from the fence so as not to trap him or her if things go wrong. If, for any reason, your mini bolts, tell your assistant to simply let go of the nylon stripping. Your mini will quickly be released from the tire. NOTE: If training a team, do the “drag” exercise with each single mini first before exercising them as a team. Working one mini at a time first will help to avoid any major wrecks that can cause your mini(s) any anxiety or distrust.

Spend as many tire drag lessons as it takes in the round pen to be sure your mini is driving easily and smoothly before graduating him to the open arena with the tire. Just as you did with simple ground driving, once he is ready, let your mini drag the tire while ground driving him through two rotations of the hourglass pattern, and then cross the long diagonal and do two more rotations in the opposite direction. Make halts often so rewards can be dispensed for a job well done. Do not make any abrupt turns or try to add speed before you are completely competent with the lines and your mini is responding obediently. Ground driving is as much for you to learn good Reinsmanship as it is for your mini to learn to drive correctly. If training more than one mini, just tie whichever mini you’re not working with at the moment off to the side and have him wait his turn before ground driving the two as a team. The frequent halts with rewards will teach him to stay clam and remain still when asked.

Before actually hitching your mini to the vehicle, be sure to check all harness straps and make sure they are correctly adjusted. While you do this, you will also be teaching your mini (or minis if a team) to stand still in the cross ties, which will make hitching much easier. Checking all harness straps can be done anywhere that your fences or hitch rails are close enough together to accommodate the cross ties and still allow enough room for a single mini (or team) and the vehicle. During this lesson, all you need to do is put on and adjust the harness, hitch to your vehicle, have your mini (or team) stand quietly while being rewarded and then take everything back off. Before leading your mini(s) away from the vehicle, spend some time rewarding again for standing still and staying in position.

To begin the next lesson, first review the steps in the previous lesson and make sure your mini (or minis in the case of a team) is standing quietly in the crossties before harnessing to the vehicle. When ground driving a single animal, ask your assistant to stand in front and to the side of your mini with a lead rope attached to a ring on the noseband (not the bit) of your mini’s harness bridle. When ground driving a team, you will need to use two assistants. Ask each assistant to stand on either side of the team. Once your mini is harnessed, and when you are seated in the vehicle and ready to go forward, ask your assistant to unsnap the cross ties and release your mini while your assistant stands at his head. Now ask your mini to “walk on.” Let him go just a few steps and then ask him to “Whoa.” If your mini does not stop promptly, your assistant can help by pulling back on the lead rope with a pull/release motion while, at the same time, you pull back on the drive lines with a pull/release motion. When he does stop, have your assistant give him his oats reward. Let your mini settle before asking him to back a couple of steps and halt again. Reward him for halting and end the lesson there. The object is to allow your mini enough time to understand what you are trying to teach him and respond accordingly so he can be rewarded without spending so much time that he gets bored and sucks you into a confrontation.

Now your mini is ready to go to the open arena to be driven for the very first time. For the sake of safety, use your assistant (or, in the case of a team, assistants) during lessons until your mini (or team) is driving easily and responding to all of your cues and verbal commands promptly and calmly. Using an assistant helps to guide your mini through his lessons when he can no longer see you out in front. Your assistant will also help your mini to drive forward with confidence, as well as being on-hand to aid you if your mini has problems with turns and backing. Using an assistant also allows you more time to perfect your Reinsmanship and your ability to plan your movements in an organized and logical way.

When your mini is hitched to a vehicle, make a very large hourglass pattern to accommodate your vehicle. His familiarity with this pattern will help him to feel calm and gain confidence while being driven. Every time you end a lesson, keep your assistant at your mini’s head until your mini is fully unhitched from the vehicle. NOTE: Always remove the harness bridle last. Once he is unhitched, make your mini stand where he is while you come to him, then reward him and lead him away. This is how he will learn to wait for you and will not become antsy and uncontrollable. Routinely practicing good manners, setting up an environment for success and approaching your mini with a calm and deliberate attitude will all help him to become a quiet, safe and reliable driving animal.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2019 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

We are the last line of defense for America’s wild horses

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Earlier this month, we set an ambitious fundraising goal of $50,000 to document the BLM’s roundup season, which began in Nevada’s Triple B Complex. That was before this week’s Senate hearing on the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program – a one-sided affair for cattle industry lobbyists, and not a single advocate for preserving America’s wild horses in the wild.

Thanks to you, we hit our $50,000 goal this week. The response from supporters like you has been an incredible boost during the hardest time of the year for wild horses. But to fight back against the stacked proceedings in the Senate – at the same time as the BLM’s terrifying and cruel roundups continue in the West – we’re now raising our goal to make sure everyone, from the American people to their elected leaders on Capitol Hill, sees how inhumane and unnecessary the BLM roundups really are.

We’re doubling down to fight the threats to wild horses and burros. Will you make a donation to help reach our new $100,000 fundraising goal, so we can continue fighting for wild horses in Washington, DC and on our Western public lands?

Thanks to your support, we’ve been out at the Triple B roundup in Nevada these past few weeks — with heartbreaking photo and video evidence that will long outlast this roundup. Just over 800 horses lost their freedom at Triple B this month; 16 of them lost their lives. These include five tiny foals, one of whom was too weak to stand after withstanding a miles-long helicopter stampede and another who died of water toxicity, likely a result of the BLM’s failure to give the vulnerable baby electrolytes after an arduous run in summer heat left him stressed and dehydrated.

We’ll use this evidence for the battles ahead. This week’s Senate hearing wasn’t just about laying the groundwork for more roundups. The cattle industry lobbyists and BLM want money to surgically sterilize wild horses who remain in the wild, by castrating stallions and ripping out the ovaries of wild mares in dangerous and painful surgeries.

The cattle industry’s path forward leads to one place — mass destruction… of wild, free-roaming horses in the wild, and of those in captivity whose days will be numbered when the government funding to care for them runs out.

We’ve increased our fundraising goal because this week’s Senate hearing proved, once again, that we are the last line of defense for keeping wild horses wild on the public lands where they belong. Please make a donation to support our work today.

Thank you for everything you’re doing during this critical time for wild horses and burros. We could not do this work without you.

Thank you,

Suzanne

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Feel Good Friday (to start your weekend right!)

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Six horses were in a kill pen in Oklahoma, one day away from shipping to slaughter, when AWHC supporters stepped in to save them. Yesterday, these lucky horses arrived in California, where they will spend the rest of their lives in a safe place.

The “Oklahoma Six” are four BLM mustangs and a quarter horse mare and foal – just three weeks old! Earlier this week, you helped us raise enough money to bail them out from the kill pen and transport them from Oklahoma to two of our great sanctuary partners in California.

Three of the mustangs are young and unhandled. One is a 2-year old filly who was in the BLM’s holding facility in Pauls Valley, OK less than three months ago. Their quick turnaround from wild and free on the range, to BLM holding pens, to the slaughter pipeline tells a cautionary tale about the ultimate fate of the thousands of federally protected mustangs that are rounded up and removed from our public lands each year.

Thank you to everyone who stepped up to save these horses and to Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang for transporting them safely from Oklahoma to California. Special big thanks as well to our board members Alicia Goetz and Ellie Price and their sanctuaries – Freedom Reigns and Montgomery Creek Ranch – for giving these six lucky horses a safe place to live out the rest of their lives.

We’ll be telling the stories of these horses in the coming days and weeks. Meanwhile, head over to our Facebook page for more info, photos and to share this Feel Good Friday story with your friends and family.

Thanks!

– AWHC Team

PS – Help us help more horses like the Oklahoma 6 by contributing to our rescue fund today

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URGENT: Dangerous hearing on wild horses tomorrow

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

If you are receiving this email, you are uniquely positioned to push back against a dangerous plan on Capitol Hill that threatens the future of wild horses.

Tomorrow, the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee’s Public Lands, Forests, and Mining Subcommittee will hold an “oversight” hearing on the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Wild Horse and Burro Program. Unfortunately, this hearing is completely stacked against wild horses and in favor of a plan that includes unprecedented mass roundups, surgical sterilization and stockpiling of mustangs in holding facilities.

Your Senator is on this Subcommittee. We need you to call today to ask him/her to communicate opposition to the destructive plan for America’s wild horses and burros.

It’s critically important that your Senator hears from you today!

Thank you,

Brieanah Schwartz, AWHC Government Relations

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Wrangler Summer Bath 001

Wranglers Donkey Diary: Wrangler’s Summer Bath

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7-11-19

It was a perfect hot day for Wrangler’s yearly summer bath! We tried taking a “selfie” with a Canon camera and telephoto lens…not too bad for our first try!

He’s a real ham! He loves to smile for the camera and eat oats from the fanny pack.

Just tell him to and he perks his ears for the pictures! Wrangler is now an 11 year old gelding and softens my loss of Little Jack Horner in 2014!

Wrangler is so much like L.J.H. it’s crazy!

Feds make major announcement

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

When we fight back to protect wild horses, it makes a real difference. In a huge win for our grassroots movement, the Trump Administration just announced that it will not pursue lethal measures – such as euthanasia or selling wild horses for slaughter – to manage America’s wild horse populations.

We’ve battled for three years to stop Congress from authorizing the mass killing of wild horses and burros. As always, we are the last line of defense for these national icons. The Administration’s policy shift shows that when we stand firm, we win!

It’s time to savor this news, but we cannot rest, because the Administration continues to pursue inhumane sterilization methods – such as surgically removing the ovaries of mares – that not only place the health and safety of wild horses and burros at risk, but also will take the wild out of these wild animals by destroying their natural behaviors.

We still have much work to do before America’s wild horses are truly protected. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation to AWHC right now, so that we can continue to fight for humane and sustainable federal wild horse and burro management policies.

This victory gives us hope for the battles ahead – it proves that actions we take to stand up for wild horses and burros make a real difference in the lives of these cherished animals.

Can you make a donation right now so that we are prepared to continue defending wild horses in the months to come?

Thank you for being part of our herd…. Onward!

– Suzanne

PS – Read more about the BLM’s decision not to pursue lethal measures for wild horses here.

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VSV – 21 Cases – Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Confirmed in Colorado

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

July 12, 2019
Colorado State
Veterinarian’s Office
Vesicular Stomatitis
21 Cases Confirmed  Weld, La Plata and Larimer Counties, Colorado
Stay informed!
Stay informed and help us protect your rights as Horse Owners
Join or Renew your Colorado Horse Council membership online today!
Did you know you can renew membership or become a new member online at the Equine City Hall?  Just  Click Here!
Save the postage and the time, and renew today!
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 12, 2019
Veterinarians and Livestock Owners Contact:  Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office, 303-869-9130
Media Contact:  Mary Peck, 303-869-9005, mary.peck@state.co.us

Broomfield, Colo. – The Colorado Department of Agriculture has additional confirmed cases of vesicular stomatitis (VSV) in La Plata, Larimer, and Weld counties. The total count of premises under quarantine for VSV by county is outlined in the table below.  CDA’s Animal Health division is updating this table with the latest data on its CDA VSV website.

Learn more

Support the Colorado Horse Council

[WATCH] Roundups underway

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

As I write this, our field representative is out on Nevada public lands documenting the roundup of the wild horses living in the Triple B Complex. Roundup documentation is crucial work to hold the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) accountable for the devastating impacts of its inhumane management program to wild horses on our public lands.

Watch and share our video from day 1 of the operation below:

These wild herds are at risk of being destroyed forever. The BLM’s 10-year plan for the Triple B and Antelope Complexes includes removing thousands of wild horses from public lands and castrating 50 percent of the stallions who remain in the wild, destroying their natural behaviors – the very essence of their wildness.

Here’s how we’re working to stop this cruelty: Last year we filed suit in the U.S. District Court in Nevada challenging the plan. Our case is currently with the Nevada Court of Appeals.

We’re also in the field to photograph, report, and monitor the situation on the ground. Our photos, videos, and reports hold the BLM accountable by informing the public and our elected leaders about the cruelty that is happening to America’s treasured horses on our public lands.

Watch and share our latest video today:

If we don’t keep watch, who will? Thank you for supporting our teams on the range, in the courts and in the halls of Congress.

Thank you,

Suzanne

 

SYALER eNewsletter

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The following is from Save Your Ass Long Ear Rescue:

July, 2019

Ears the news…

 

I apologize for the lapse in newsletters. For those of you who do not visit us via FaceBook, you don’t know what has been going on here so I will begin with an update.

In April we took in six donkeys from a sale barn who came to us very, very ill. Our vet prepared us for the fact that they might not all make it. The donkeys  were diagnosed with  influenza and another virus. One of them, only a baby herself, aborted her foal. Two weeks after that the mules who were not even near the donkeys, came down with strangles. (The donkeys did NOT have strangles) The whole farm was put in quarantine. We beefed up our bio security big time; hazmat suits for all, foot covers, gloves, bleach to clean EVERYTHING anyone touched. Foot baths outside every entrance to every barn, and a change of suits; clothing EVERY time we changed locations.

I am happy to report that the donkeys have all recovered. After being brought up to date with vaccinations and having their hooves, which were in horrid condition trimmed they will soon be ready to be adopted.  We have negative test results on three of the mules, and two more will be tested next week. Hopefully they too will have negative results and be ready to go to new homes.

This ordeal has been incredibly stressful emotionally. It has seriously impacted our financial footing as well and it’s not over yet. We have incurred close to 9,000 in vet bills. We have been blown away by the amazing generosity of our loyal supporters.  If not for this wonderful group of people I don’t know how we would have made it through this. I don’t have the words to adequately express our gratitude.

I would be remiss if I did not thank our amazing vet Kristen Clapp and uber technician Remington Morancy; they have been phenomenal. Thanks to State Veterinarian Steve Crawford for working with us as well.  Of course super star Hannah Exel stepped right up to the plate and did whatever needed to be done. The help of our part time worker Kim Nelson and our Farm Fam pal Pomme took a bit of the load off as well. Wonderful SYA  volunteer Pam Kissel willingly dressed in hazmat gear to make sure all the animals got groomed and some cuddle time.  Those suits are like a wearable sauna. NOT FUN.  In the thirteen years of running the rescue I have never had to deal with anything like this and hope to never have to again!

I hope to get back on track with regular newsletters.

 

ChEARS,

Ann

President & Shelter Manager

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VSV -Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Confirmed in Colorado

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

Colorado State
Veterinarian’s Office
Vesicular Stomatitis Case Confirmed in Weld County, Colorado
Stay informed!
Stay informed and help us protect your rights as Horse Owners
Join or Renew your Colorado Horse Council membership online today!
Did you know you can renew membership or become a new member online at the Equine City Hall?  Just  Click Here!
Save the postage and the time, and renew today!
Horses in Weld County, Colorado test positive for vesicular stomatitis
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 5, 2019
Veterinarians and Livestock Owners Contact:  Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office, 303-869-9130
Media Contact:  Mary Peck, 303-869-9005, mary.peck@state.co.us

Broomfield, Colo. – Colorado has become the third state in the U.S. to have confirmed cases of vesicular stomatitis (VSV). Previous positive cases of vesicular stomatitis in 2019 have been diagnosed in Kinney and Tom Green counties in Texas and in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

On July 3rd, the National Veterinary Services Laboratory reported positive test results on samples submitted from two horses in Weld County. The two horses reside on separate locations in Weld County and have been placed under quarantine. The initial Colorado disease investigation was completed by a field veterinarian from the State Veterinarian’s Office at the Colorado Department of Agriculture.

“Vesicular stomatitis can be painful for animals and costly to their owners,” said Colorado State Veterinarian, Dr. Keith Roehr. “The virus typically causes oral blisters and sores that can be painful causing difficulty in eating and drinking.”

The Weld County epidemiological investigation indicates an incursion of VSV-infected insect vectors is the likely source of infection. Biosecurity measures and vector mitigation have been instituted on both locations to reduce the potential spread of the virus. The animals are being monitored daily and the index premises will remain under state quarantine until at least 14 days from the onset of lesions in the last affected animal on the premises. There are no USDA approved vaccines for VSV.

Vesicular Stomatitis Background

Vesicular stomatitis is a viral disease that primarily affects horses and cattle, and occasionally swine, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas. The transmission process of VSV is not completely understood, but includes insect vectors such as black flies, sand flies, and biting midges.

The incubation period ranges from 2-8 days. Clinical signs include vesicles, erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, teats, and coronary bands. Often excessive salivation is the first sign of disease, along with a reluctance to eat or drink. Lameness and weight loss may follow.

Humans may become infected when handling affected animals, but this is a rare event.  To avoid human exposure, individuals should use personal protective measures when handling affected animals.

Tips for Livestock Owners

  • Strict fly control is an important factor to inhibit the transmission of the disease.
  • Avoid transferring feeding equipment, cleaning tools or health care equipment from other herds.
  • Colorado veterinarians and livestock owners should contact the state of destination when moving livestock interstate to ensure that all import requirements are met. Contact information for all state veterinarian offices is listed here.
  • Colorado fairs, livestock exhibitions, and rodeos may institute new entry requirements based on the extent and severity of the current VS outbreak. Certificates of veterinary inspection (CVIs or health certificates) issued within 2-5 days prior to an event can be beneficial in reducing risks. Be sure to stay informed of any new livestock event requirements. See the Vesicular Stomatitis Guidelines for Shows and Fairs.
Important Points for Veterinarians
Any vesicular disease of livestock is reportable to the State Veterinarian’s Office in Colorado – to report call 303-869-9130. If after hours, the voice message will indicate which staff veterinarian on call.
Additional resources

CDA Vesicular Stomatitis Information

Support the Colorado Horse Council

911 FOR HORRIBLY INJURY – MORE BABIES COMING, AND WE NEED HELP RIGHT NOW! WE CAN’T LET THEM SHIP :(

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

I am literally sick to my stomach and crying as I write this. The beautiful bay has a so called, “blown out knee”. We need to commit to save her right now. She is heading to the slaughter truck, if we don’t step up. Look at that leg, it has to be excruciating! That is how she stands (see middle pix).

I have to say I am saying YES, praying and believing that y’all would not let her down. Watching her move is beyond excruciating, and I cannot believe any human could leave a horse like that.

So she was headed to the slaughter truck, her knee basically broken, and in absolute agony. I am so angry and so sick. I just cried and cried when I saw her trying to walk. We need to call the emergency vet out asap, and I also told my person to GO AHEAD!. I am running on absolute faith, but the person who left this horse like this should be punished beyond belief.

On top of that we have her buddy, a 30 year old gelding who is slowly starving as his teeth are in beyond deplorable shape. He has horrible open sores in his mouth from his teeth poking into his gums, and is blind to boot. These horses have been through more pain than any horse should ever suffer. We were told the gelding has cancer, and you can see the tumors all over his head and neck.

We need to commit to both of these horses. AND, while I was writing this, I RECEIVED ANOTHER CALL about more orphans at the shipping yard.

SO WE NEED HELP, AND WE NEED IT NOW. PLEASE HELP US SAVE THESE 2 and provide what they need. I am sure the emergency vet will not be cheap, but we need to help this mare RIGHT NOW! Her pain ends tonight.

We also need to save the orphaned foals, bail them, vet them and get them home.

What a horrible way to live the “golden years”. Sometimes this is just way too much to even begin to deal with.

I told our person to call the vet, and again, I am absolutely running on faith. Faith that no one out there will let that mare suffer another minute more than she has to. Can you imagine walking on a broken leg with all that weight???? She can’t even bend over to get to water.

I know there are at least 2 more orphans, and we all know how those numbers can climb quickly.

_We had to put down “Our Beautiful Boy”, the one who was saved after Lucky Man got another home, prior to Matt picking him up. He too was in absolute agony and could barely even stand. He would have also been on the slaughter truck floor. _

There is way too much heartbreak. We had a $1000 vet bill from the last kids in WA, and they same day we had a huge bill in NV, and that is the day we had to euthanize Our Beautiful Boy; So between our last 2 vet bills, the ones we are incurring with these 2 kids, and the one for the new orphans, we will be hurting tremendously, and that is not even beginning to add up all the new expenses that will come with these kids.

I can only say THANK YOU, on behalf of all the horses you have saved. Especially from the ones who would have died during transport. The gift you have given these horses is amazing, and yes, once again I am asking you to help more horses.

It is definitely “GO TIME”!

WE NEED YOU TO SAVE THEM! PLEASE HELP IF YOU CAN!

Y’all are amazing, and YOU HAVE SAVED SO MANY LIVES! Thank you for always being there for the horses.

Thank you as always, for your amazing love and support. We treasure all our Chilly Pepper Family and appreciate the fact that YOU MAKE THIS ALL POSSIBLE! We will keep on fighting as long as we have the funds to make it happen, even though on days like today it is simply too much. :(

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

https://www.gofundme.com/f/save-orphan-foals-amp-horses-from-slaughter?

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Vanished

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Hundreds of Nevada wild horses are living their last moments of peace and freedom this weekend. Early next week, the roundups begin.

Please, make a donation now to help AWHC fight back on behalf of these innocent mustangs. Your support will help us document these cruel operations, challenge federal wild horse policies in Congress and the courts, and demonstrate through our field programs that there is a better way to manage wild horses and burros.

In just days, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will send helicopters into the Triple B Complex in eastern Nevada to capture and remove 800 wild horses from the public lands they call home. Over the next 10 years, the BLM plans to reduce the wild horses in this area to one mustang per every 4,800 acres while allowing intensive commercial livestock grazing to continue on the public lands designated as wild horse habitat.

Please help keep us in the field at the roundups to hold BLM accountable for the ongoing cruelty that is paid for by our tax dollars. 

Thank you,

– AWHC Team

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Celebrating freedom

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Since our earliest days of exploration, immigration, and refuge, the American Wild Horse has embodied the values of our nation.

Freedom. Independence. Honor. 

These values are worth fighting for.

Thank you for supporting the fight for their future. You’re a crucial team member in our work to ensure the mustangs we all love and cherish stay wild and free.

From all of us at the  American Wild Horse Campaign have a safe and happy Independence Day!

– The AWHC Team

 

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