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All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘equines’

What percentage of Americans want slaughter?

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We just completed a national poll about wild horses, asking Americans whether they want continuing protection of wild horses or slaughter. The result:

  • 80% of Americans “prefer continuing protection of America’s wild horses from slaughter”
  • 15% of Americans “think we should end protections and allow slaughter of America’s wild horses
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ALL 49 MUSTANGS SAVED FROM SLAUGHTER – WE DID IT !

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

NO HORSE LEFT BEHIND!49 Mustangs Saved from Slaughter!

Yes 49…. WE DID IT!!! Thanks to everyone who stepped up we were able to save the lives of ALL 49 mustangs we were called to help. After these mustangs are rounded up, we get a courtesy phone call and we are the only chance they have to avoid being shipped directly to slaughter.

Initially we were not supposed to bring any horses back to Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang. But how do you look deep into the eyes of the stallions and simply walk away. CPMM is one of the few places who can take on wild stallions, and no one else was going to step up. As they stood there patiently staring at me, the decision was made.

How can you walk away from horses you CAN save, and look in the mirror? Yes, it makes things extremely difficult at times, and is much more expensive as we incur the gelding costs before we can place them, not to mention stallions can be a lot of work. However, the only alternative was to look at them and say “nope – you are too much trouble – die a horrible death”, and it was not an option as we did have the capability of saving them.

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WATCH: The choice on wild horses

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Right now, Washington is ablaze in controversy and partisan bickering. But behind it, too many are missing a critical story: if Congress signs off on the Bureau of Land Management’s budget request, as many as 100,000 wild horses and burros will be slaughtered.

This isn’t fear-mongering. It’s what’s at stake if we overturn the ban on horse slaughter. And if we’re going to stop it, we need to get this story out there and make sure Congress and Americans at-large understand what could happen in just a matter of weeks.

Watch our latest web video and then share it on Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #NoHorseSlaughter.

We need to turn up the volume. And fast. So please watch our video now and share it.

Thank you for being with us and America’s wild horses,

-Suzanne Roy

P.S. Please also consider a donation as we intensify our campaigning in Washington and across the country.

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Time’s a Flyin’, Reminder, It’s time for Quarterly All Volunteer Meeting, Tomorrow 7/8

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

AAE’s Quarterly All Volunteer Meeting is an opportunity for all volunteers to come together for an update on current happenings, upcoming events, and updated volunteer needs. It’s also a good time for anyone interested in getting involved to learn more about AAE. Bring family or bring anyone interested in volunteering or otherwise supporting our cause.

 

Our agenda will include the following:

  • Presentation by 5th grader, Maya B.
  • Horse Updates
  • Volunteer Updates and Needs
  • Board of Director Updates and Activities
  • Community Outreach Updates and Activities
  • Fundraising Upcoming Events and Needs
  • Grants – Updates
  • Programs – Updates and Activities

Please bring either an appetizer or dessert to share at 6:00pm, meeting will begin at 6:30pm and end by 8:00pm.

Thank YOU all for making AAE possible.

Read on AAE Website

Slaughter 100,000 wild horses?

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Here’s what we know:

1) The Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) 2018 budget asks Congress to lift a ban on destroying healthy mustangs and burros.

2) If the ban is lifted, wild horses and burros in holding facilities will be killed or sold to slaughter. The remaining “excess” population will be slaughtered, possibly gunned-down in the wild. Up to 92,000 healthy horses will die.

3) The Congressional markup to decide if this slaughter provision is included will happen in the next two weeks.

We have two weeks to stop the mass slaughter of America’s wild horses. Will you contact your member of Congress right now and tell them #NoHorseSlaughter?

If this sounds like the worst-case-scenario for our cause, it is. If Congress accepts the BLM’s budget provision, we would see an unprecedented mass slaughter of healthy horses and burros. It would lead to horses being slaughtered for human consumption. It would destroy our nation’s icons of freedom. It would be a tragedy.

We’re kicking off the first of two weeks of action to stop this nightmare from becoming reality. Today, we need you to contact your member of Congress.

In the next two weeks, our leaders must hear us loud and clear: #NoHorseSlaughter. No way.

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Senate Appropriations Committee Hearing

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

WHAT’S HAPPENING: Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is scheduled to testify before the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee this Wednesday, June 21. He will defend his Fiscal Year 2018 budget, which asks Congress to lift the ban on destroying healthy wild horses and burros and selling these cherished animals for slaughter.

WHY YOU SHOULD ACT: The Senators on this subcommittee play a key role in determining whether as many as 92,000 wild horses and burros will be slaughtered and their wild populations reduced to near-extinction levels.

WHAT TO SAY:  Call your Senator, or subcommittee leadership, if your Senator is not included on the list below. Suggested message: “My name is _____ calling from _____.  Please ask Senator  _____  to strongly oppose the BLM’s budget request to lift the ban on killing healthy horses and burros and selling these animals ‘without restriction,’ which would lead to the brutal slaughter of thousands. Please require the BLM to use humane birth control, as recommended by the National Academy of Sciences, not killing to manage our wild horses and burros.” 

WHO YOU SHOULD CALL:

ALASKA RESIDENTS: Call Senator Lisa Murkowski, 202-224-6665. Follow up with a personal message: CLICK HERE

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS: Call Senator Dianne Feinstein, 202-224-3841. If this is busy call her office in San Francisco (415-393-0707) or Los Angeles (310-914-7300). Follow up by sending a personal message: CLICK HERE.

MARYLAND RESIDENTS: Call Senator Chris Van Hollen, 202-224-4654. Follow up by sending a personal message: CLICK HERE.

MONTANA RESIDENTS: Call Senator Jon Tester, 202-224-2644. Follow up by sending a personal message: CLICK HERE.

NEW MEXICO RESIDENTS: Call Senator Tom Udall, 202-224-6621. Follow up by sending a personal message: CLICK HERE.

OREGON RESIDENTS: Call Senator Jeff Merkley, 202-224-3753. Follow up by sending a personal message: CLICK HERE (Choose “share your opinion on bills or other issues”)

RHODE ISLAND RESIDENTS: Call Senator Jack Reed, 202-224-4642. Follow up by sending a personal message: CLICK HERE.

VERMONT RESIDENTS: Call Senator Patrick Leahy, 202-224-4242. Follow up by sending a personal message: CLICK HERE.

RESIDENTS OF ALL OTHER STATES: Call Subcommittee Chair Lisa Murkowski, 202-224-6665 and Ranking Member Tom Udall: 202-224-6621. Even though you are not a constituent, let them know that you are calling because our public lands and our wild horses and burros belong to all Americans, and all Americans should have a say in how they are managed

Remember: Please be polite and respectful in order to be the most effective voice possible for our wild horses and burros! Thank you!!

– The AWHC Team

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9 Beautiful Souls safe & in the Trailer!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Quick update. – As usual, the information we received when we get a call usually changes by the time we actually pick up. This time was no different. We were able to save Double-J n Trailer, thanks to the awesome folks at the actual DOUBLE-J TRAILERS in Woodland WA.

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To Honor a Life Lost, – Let’s Save these now! Immediate help needed!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

It is with extreme sorrow I share the news that June 1, Colt slipped quietly away with his head in my lap. The vet had been to see him just that afternoon, and was extremely pleased with the way his wounds were healing and his progress in general. We knew he was weak, but was eating, drinking, pooping and peeing. Unfortunately, the trauma was too much and about an hour before he passed he let me know he was done. So we sat quietly together until he slipped away. As the tears streamed down I reminded him of how many folks loved him and had prayed for him.

So I am hoping that we can honor his memory by saving the mare and foal that are waiting for us to pick them up, as well as the ones who are being rounded up this weekend.

We received the call this morning while we were on the way to get the Rolling Foal Hospital repaired. The -40 degree weather really caused a lot of damage, in spite of our efforts to weatherproof it.

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Time is Running Out! Don’t Wait…Donate!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue

WE ARE IN THE HOME STRETCH!

Big Day of Giving ends at midnight! We are about half way to our goal, but there is still time to donate.  Help us meet our goal in the last 4 hours!

This year, our goal is to engage 200 donors and raise $10,000 to help us FILL THE BARN to help support our feed and care costs! 

Do you know what your donation could do?  

Last year it cost over $50,000 for feed, supplements and care for the horses at AAE! Your donation of any amount will help feed a horse, assist with the cost of veterinary care, or provide for other needs such as hoof or dental care.

Help us care for these majestic animals and donate today!

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Update: Lil’ Orphan Filly

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

Our sweet little one is still moving in the right direction. She has made substantial improvement in her whole 10 days of life. Her first lab results for a muscle enzyme showed her values were off the charts. Normal is 800, and upon intake she was at 120,000, the highest level the equipment could read.  As of yesterday, her muscle enzyme levels and other blood levels were within normal range. She is still weak and unable to get up on her own, which is not uncommon, but once she’s helped to stand, her mobility is MUCH improved !!  Thanks to her docs at Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center, her hospitalization is winding down, and she will be home soon, but she has a long rehab/recovery to come and she’s not out of the woods by far.  To say her journey has been a rollercoaster ride is an understatement, but we thank you all so much for your support and assistance with this little gal.

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Little Filly Fund

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

Donate today!

In the hustle and bustle of our busiest time of year, we have a critical case, an orphan filly that was not only rejected by mom, but reeling from the effects of mom’s rejection, malnourishment and selenium deficiency, topped of by stress of transport and dehydration.  She needs your help!

We go the call yesterday (4/5), a plea for assistance with an orphaned foal who was just a few hours old. She had been rejected by mom and needed help.

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The UHC Welcomes Two New Members

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The following is from the Unwanted Horse Coalition:

The UHC welcomes two new members, the Retired Racehorse Project and Palmetto Carriage Works. Each will be featured in future editions of the UHC Roundup. Member organizations help make programmatic decisions in the areas of education, programs, funding, and visibility.

For a full list of members, visit www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org/member-organizations/ or to inquire about UHC membership and programs, contact the UHC office at uhc@horsecouncil.org.

Click Here To Read on UHC

The Veterinarian’s Role in Equine Abuse Investigations

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The following is an article from The Horse.

The Veterinarian's Role in Equine Abuse Investigations

Photo: Courtesy of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

Veterinarians must know how to properly document findings and avoid destroying evidence while still putting the horse’s welfare first.

How a veterinarian goes about examining and treating allegedly abused horses can mean the difference between a successful or unsuccessful case against the owner. He or she must know how to properly document all findings and avoid destroying evidence while still putting the horse’s welfare first.

Nicole Eller, DVM, a Minnesota-based field shelter veterinarian with the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ Field Investigations and Response team, described the veterinarian’s unique role in animal crime scene investigations during her presentation at the 2016 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 3-7 in Orlando, Florida.

First, she reviewed the basics of evidence identification, collection, and preservation. “Evidence is generally defined as anything that can demonstrate or disprove a fact in contention,” said Eller. In equine abuse investigations, this can include anything from photos of a horse’s injuries or body condition to the moldy hay in his feeder.

Veterinarians must view these cases through the lens of someone looking for and collecting evidence. As the equine expert, the veterinarian will recognize key pieces of evidence that other investigators might overlook.

Eller then described the four phases of processing an animal crime scene.

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Horse Welfare Report Clears European Parliament Hurdle

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The following is an article from The Herald.

The report from Julie Girling MEP sets out to stop the abuse of horses across Europe and ensure their welfare is catered for

The report from Julie Girling MEP sets out to stop the abuse of horses across Europe and ensure their welfare is catered for.

Major steps to halt the abuse and cruel exploitation of horses and donkeys, set out in a report from British MEP Julie Girling, were approved this week by a key committee of the European Parliament.

The package of measures for equine welfare received the approval of the European Parliament’s Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee on Wednesday (January 25).

“We are on our way to a better deal for donkeys and horses. Cruelty and neglect is a problem across the continent and we must tackle it,” Mrs Girling declared.

Julie Girling, Conservative MEP for the South West and Gibraltar

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Donation Brings Companion To Kona’s Most Famous, Loneliest Donkey

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The following is an article from West Hawaii Today.

KEALAKEKUA — Loneliness isn’t just a human phenomenon. Its existence has been well documented throughout the animal kingdom, from elephants to primates to canines.

It’s even prevalent with donkeys, the beasts of burden that served a fundamental function in the development of the coffee industry on Hawaii Island.

Just this week, perhaps the island’s most famous donkey — Charlie, the 30-year-old pack animal who has spent the better part of the last 15 years as a staple of the Kona Coffee Living History Farm — finally found himself a friend to share the load.

The Kona Historical Society, which operates the farm, announced Tuesday that its crowd funding campaign, “Charlie Needs a Bestie,” had resulted in the donation of a 6-month old donkey.

“We used to joke his only friends were chickens,” said Gavin Miculka, assistant program director at the Kona Historical Society.

“And those chickens were kind of selfish friends, because they’d just come around when he was eating and steal all of his food,” added Carolyn Lucas-Zenk, volunteer coordinator and development associate with the society. “He’s getting old in age. We wanted him to have a friend. Wouldn’t everybody want a friend instead of being here lonely, by yourself, with some selfish chickens?”

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CHARITY FEARS DONKEYS ARE BEING ‘BLUDGEONED TO DEATH’ FOR SKIN TRADE

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The following is an article from Horse & Hound.

An animal charity has called for a halt to the global donkey skin trade after finding shocking welfare concerns and suffering on a mass scale.

The Donkey Sanctuary has conducted an investigative report into the trade, titled Under The Skin, and has found that as many as 10 million donkeys are at risk.

It is lobbying for an immediate end to the trade until it can be “proven to be sustainable and humane.”

“We have seen reports of donkeys being skinned alive, being bludgeoned to death, being transported for long distances with no opportunity to rest, feed or drink,” said Alex Mayers, the charity’s international program manager.

“The welfare of any donkey, both during and at the end of its life, is paramount and should be the primary concern, as for any food-producing animal.

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There Are 100 Million Working Horses, Donkeys & Mules in the World– We Want to Help Them All

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The following is an article from The London Economic.

There are 100 million working horses, donkeys and mules in the world. They are the tractors, taxis and engines that power developing economies, working in the construction industry, carrying food and water, and transporting goods to market. It’s estimated that each animal can support a family of six, so around 600 million people’s lives are supported by a working equine – 8% of the world’s population. Without healthy working horses, donkeys and mules, they wouldn’t be able to put food on their tables, send their children to school or build better futures for themselves and their families. However, it’s estimated that more than half of these animals suffer from exhaustion, dehydration and malnutrition as a result of excessive workloads and limited animal health services

Brooke is an international charity that protects and improves the lives of working equines. The UK based charity works to deliver significant and lasting change, even in some of the world’s most challenging areas. Their teams concentrate on training and support for owners of owners and handlers, as well as local vets, farriers, harness makers and animal traders to improve standards of care. They operate in 11 different countries, and fund small projects in others. Brooke also conducts research, and works with policy makers to make overarching changes to the way governments tackle working equine welfare.

One of the countries that Brooke works in is Kenya, a country with almost 2 million donkeys. Around 50% of people live below the poverty line, so these animals support many people’s lives in both urban and rural areas, transporting food and fuels. Brooke has been working through local partners in the country since 2011, and opened an office in Nairobi in 2013, with programmes stretching from Turkana County in the North to Kajiado in the South. The work focusses on bringing communities together to make donkey welfare a group priority, with a financial focus.

©Brooke/Freya Dowson.

 

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How You Can Help Stop Horses, Camels and Other Animals Suffering On Your Holidays

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The following is an article from Wander Lust.

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“You don’t have to be very bright to see if an animal looks like it’s on Death Row,” says Jeremy Hulme, Chief Executive of animal welfare charity SPANA. “If you’re looking at a horse or mule, and it’s head is down, it’s looking thin and its bones are sticking out, it’s obviously not right. If it’s limping, you know it’s got problems.”

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Most savvy travelers are now clued up on how animal experiences, from elephant rides to tiger temples, might be harmful to animals. Less attention is paid, though, to horses, donkeys, mules and camels put to work in the tourism industry, which is why SPANA has launched a Holiday Hooves campaign.

Thousands of animals are used in travel experiences, from camel rides and horse-drawn carriages to mules carrying gear on expeditions. The animals are often essential to their owners’ livelihoods, but in some cases are cruelly treated, neglected or kept in poor conditions.

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Prey or Predators?

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Are equines prey or predators? Although some trainers base their methods on the idea that equines should be approached as “prey,” this blog post by Sara Annon explains that the answer may not be that simple.

An excerpt:

The real lesson in this is that the predator/prey model of horsemanship is inaccurate. Rodents are prey animals. Horses are herd animals.  Their enemy is the weather (click here  and here). Horses die from hypothermia in winter, drought in summer, and starvation when grazing is scarce. Weakened animals are picked off by the occasional courageous wolf pack or lion. I say courageous because it only takes one quick smack with a hoof to break bones, and for a predator that is a death sentence.

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