Monthly Archive for: ‘January, 2022’

LAST CHANCE!! Renew Your 2022 AWHC Support TODAY >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We have big plans for 2022!

We’re continuing our fight in the courts, in the field, and on the Hill to protect America’s wild horses and burros in 2022 and for years to come. 

We’re so grateful to have you alongside us in the fight to protect our wild herds. If you haven’t already, will you renew your support as an AWHC member to help fuel our fight for wild horses and burros in 2022? Tomorrow marks the end of the month, so renew your support now, before it’s too late!

RENEW YOUR 2022 SUPPORT

Thanks for standing with us,

— AWHC Team

You voted, so here it is (!!) 

Introducing our OFFICIAL 2022 American Wild Horse Campaign Member Card:

We have so much in store for 2022. Not only are we continuing our fight on the Hill, in the courts, and in the field — we’re also working on a number of groundbreaking new initiatives — all in the name of keeping wild horses and burros in the wild where they belong.

Will you renew your support as an AWHC member to help fuel our fight for wild horses and burros in 2022?

We’re laser-focused on the fight to preserve the freedom of our wild mustangs and burros. That means in 2022, we are … proving through our PZP program on Nevada’s Virginia Range that humane in the wild management works … expanding our investigative team to uncover abuse and hold the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) accountable … continuing our lawsuit against the BLM’s Adoption Incentive Program that’s sending horses and burros to slaughter … working with a prestigious university to make roundup violations enforceable by law … and so much more!!

But to have the means necessary to protect our cherished wild horses and burros for generations to come, we need your help. Will you renew your support as an AWHC member today to help fuel our fight in 2022?

RENEW YOUR 2022 SUPPORT

Thank you for your support of our wild herds.

— American Wild Horse Campaign

IMG 5203

Wrangler’s Donkey Diary: First Farrier/Veterinarian Check-up

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7-7-17

Oats will definitely make this better!

 

You know it’s not polite to stare!

 

Nice to meet you Dr. Farrand!

 

…but nothing that Neosporin can’t handle.

 

So you want me to stand up straight?

 

Checking respiration? Ooh, that tickles!

 

Do you see anything in there?

 

Does it look okay, Doc?

 

Yup, small feet and big ankles… fetlocks!

Nice to meet you Farrier Dean!

 

So all you want me to do is walk around?

 

Yes, the chafing from the trailer is a bit sore …

 

It looks worse than it really is.

 

Checking my heart rate?

 

Can you see anything through the hair?

 

That is a bit bright on the eye!

 

I know I have very small feet!

 

The other front is small, but good, too!

Checking my pulse and I passed my health check!

 

LMVTurnout

Longears Music Videos: All Turnouts Must End

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This fight won’t end until the cash incentive payments stop

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Last year, we uncovered that hundreds of wild horses and burros were sent into the slaughter pipeline as a result of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Adoption Incentive Program (AIP).

After our work led to a New York Times front-page report exposing the program for its devastating failure to protect America’s wild herds, members of the public, wild horse advocates, and Congress stepped up to call for the suspension of the AIP and for large-scale, meaningful changes to the program.

Earlier this week, the BLM announced a new set of reforms to the AIP, let me be clear: These reforms do not go far enough.

Despite the recommendation from its own advisory board, the BLM failed to eliminate the cash incentive feature of the program — a critical reason why so many wild horses and burros are ending up in kill pens across the country.

Our fight against the AIP continues on until the cash incentive payments stop. We’re fighting back in court, in the field, and on the Hill to put an end to this failed program as we know it. Can you chip in now to fuel our fight against the Adoption Incentive Program?

DONATE

Meredith: In the last 15 months, our team has identified over 500 wild horses and burros in kill pens — many of these innocent animals we’ve confirmed to be victims of the AIP.

The cash incentive payments are a critical flaw of the AIP — with the new changes the BLM announced, adopters are now receiving lump-sum payments of $1,000 per animal at the end of 12-months, and are still able to adopt up to 4 animals per year. This means that once adopters collect their money, they still have the ability to dump these innocent animals in kill pens like trash.

We’re fighting back every way that we can. We intend to move forward with our lawsuit and we are expanding our investigative work. Can you make a donation of whatever you can afford to fuel our fight against the AIP?

DONATE

Thank you for your support,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

CHILLY PEPPER – It’s “GO TIME”. 1st 911 of the year. Emaciated, starving Great Grandma n 2 others 1

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Chilly Pepper needs help now to save the old gals. We got the call and we need to go get these horses right away. Luckily these horses have been loved and well cared for. They are mostly unhandled brood mares, and I was told today by the gentleman who has been caring for them he thinks they are in their 20’s???

We need funds to save these horses. ie funds for transport, (have you seen the price of diesel? – It is making transport costs go through the roof.), funds for vetting, feed and any incidental vet needs they have. I imagine many will also need their teeth done. The most wonderful thing about this is that they have been WELL LOVED, which we rarely see. We were called because they didn’t want them to end up with a kill buyer, in a pen shipping to slaughter or anywhere else they wouldn’t be safe. Time was of the essence, so we are happily stepping up IF we can afford to responsibly take them on.

Vetting is scheduled for Monday, but I still have a bill I need to pay off at Goldendale Veterinary Clinic from last year before I start incurring new bills for this year.

We picked up the 3 starved Arabians, and sadly the oldest had to be euthanized. We spent 6 hours at the vet with Doc trying everything to give her a chance. She simply did not want to leave. By the end of the 6 hours, she looked at me and let me know she was done. That was another $2800 bill for her care and to x-ray the other injured ones. Both of them are doing well and gaining weight and safe at home in NV. Once I have the vet bills caught up, they will need their teeth done as well. They are both gaining weight and loving their soft hay and grain.

Apparently this new year is well on it’s way and once again I am counting on my Chilly Pepper Family to keep helping us save lives.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
12965 Green Saddle Drive, #233
Golconda, NV 89414

checks to PO Box 233,

Golconda NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Announcing our newest initiative to protect wild horses and burros from slaughter >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Today, we are so excited to share with you our next initiative in our fight to protect horses and burros — both wild and domestic — from slaughter!

Despite their federal protection, wild horses and burros continue to face the ever-present threat of brutal helicopter roundups — a tragic result of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) mismanaged Wild Horse and Burro Program. Once captured, these innocent animals are stripped of their freedom and forced into holding, many entering the slaughter pipeline. 

In an effort to permanently put an end to horse slaughter, we have partnered with the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI) as a sponsoring organization of the Homes for Horses Coalition! 

The Homes for Horses Coalition (HHC) is a national initiative made up of more than 520 member organizations with the ultimate goal of ending horse slaughter and all other forms of equine abuse for good.

Each year, tens of thousands of American horses and burros are exported for slaughter to Mexico and Canada for human consumption in foreign markets. And as we exposed last year through our investigative work, the BLM’s Adoption Incentive Program is placing “truckloads” of our iconic wild horses and burros in imminent danger of becoming victims of the brutal industry.

The BLM’s proposed roundups are only accelerating, and as a result, an increasing number of federally protected wild mustangs and burros are expected to enter the pipeline in the coming years. 

Through our new role with HHC, we’ll be joining AWI in supporting the boots-on-the-ground rescues by providing advocacy leadership and resources to strengthen the nonprofits doing heroic jobs to help horses in need.

HHC is the only network of its kind in the nation, and we couldn’t be more proud to be a part of this important effort. It’s time to end horse slaughter once and for all. Are you with us?

Stay tuned for more updates and announcements from the coalition!

— American Wild Horse Campaign

8a22303a CCCC 1

MULE CROSSING: From Mules to Riches

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By Meredith Hodges

Long before the Founding Fathers drafted our constitution, America began as a religious nation under God, and the mule has his roots in religion just as does the country he has helped to build. The mule of today’s ancestor is the donkey, mentioned in the Bible numerous times as an animal respected by God and blessed by Jesus Christ. The donkey was even chosen to bring Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem and, later, acted as the mount Jesus himself used for his ride into the city of Jerusalem.

Here is an ancient story, quoted directly from the Bible, illustrating the mule’s wonderful sense of humor: “So Zadok the priest, and Nathan the prophet, and Benaiah the son of Jehoiada and the Cherethites, and the Pelethites, went down and caused Solomon to ride upon king David’s mule, and brought him to Gihon.” I Kings 1:38

“And Absolom met the servants of David. And Absolom rode upon a mule, and the mule went under the thick boughs of a great oak, and his head caught hold of the oak, and he was taken up between the Heavens and the earth, and the mule that was under him went away.” II Samuel 18:9.

Mules are the true professionals of slapstick humor and professional psychotherapy! When you get into an altercation with a mule, you will seldom get hurt, but you will surely be set straight in a most humiliating way.

In the early days of what was to become the United States of America, mules and horses perpetuated the expansion of the colonists into the Western territories of America. Since these early times, the American mule has acted not only as a pack animal for miners and fur traders penetrating the West, but it has also played an important part in our country’s defense, being able to cross terrain not accessible by any other means, and carrying and pulling heavier loads of weaponry than horses could even begin to carry.

When the fight for freedom from England’s rule was launched with the American Revolution, donkeys and horses were used in varying capacities to help win the battle for our country’s liberty.

Freedom was won as a result of the combined efforts of humans, animals and faith. One need only examine the humble traits and character of mules and donkeys to see that they indeed possessed the faith and the strong constitution to make some very important contributions to this country’s independence.

Drivers and mules, Gary, W. Va., Mine, where much of the mining and carrying is done by machinery. Location: Gary, West Virginia.

As they say, an army “marches on its stomach,” so it was a natural for Americans to progress further and delve into agriculture. Because of the extraordinary ability of mules to work for longer periods of time in sometimes harsh and unrelenting climates, their surefootedness and resistance to parasites and disease and with their ability to work long hours, the mule became the gem of agriculture. He learned his job quickly and put his heart and soul into every task.

When American coal mining was booming, the mule was such a valuable member of the mining process, that a good mining mule was considered to actually be more valuable than a human miner. Mining has always been a dangerous business, and the mining mule’s innate sense of self-preservation was well known. “Mules are very smart…They know what they can do and would never do anything they couldn’t or would not want to do. Mules were known to pull at least three full mine cars full of coal. If you hooked up a fourth car they would balk at any commands and just stand there. No way would they pull the fourth car!” 1

“Mules are the living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West. Mules were the pack animals of Spanish padres and grizzled prospectors. These animals have a dominant place in frontier history. From 1883 to 1889, the 20-mule teams moved 20 million pounds of borax out of Death Valley, California, to Mojave—165 miles away—traveling 15 to 18 miles a day. The 20-mule teams, the dramatic solution of a transportation problem, soon became a world-famous symbol, the trademark first of the Pacific Borax Company and, today, of the many products made by U.S. Borax.” 2 So began the mule’s vital contributions to industry and the economy.

Man and donkey out on Tanner Ledge, Grand Canyon, Arizona

In 1976, under the direction of the North American Trail Ride Conference, the Bicentennial Wagon train became a notable event in American history. Commemorating the trek West that was made so long ago by brave and adventurous pioneers, the Bicentennial journey went from California east to Valley Forge, retracing the steps of these first U.S. settlers. The outriders brought back scrolls of signatures signed by enthusiastic citizens to reaffirm their belief in the principles upon which America was founded. State by state, wagons met up with the main train and joined the trek. No doubt, many of these Bicentennial wagons were pulled by our beloved mules. “Going through my deceased folks’ stuff, I found an ‘Official Souvenir Program’ of the Bicentennial Wagon Train Pilgrimage. It’s interesting reading about the program in 1995–‘96, to have a Conestoga wagon or Prairie Schooner from each of the 50 states across the country on historic trails, ending up at Valley Forge on July third.” 3

Although some Americans have become concerned about the impact donkeys may have on the environment and, in particular, on our state parks, there is no evidence that the burro will reproduce at a rate that will threaten the ecosystem, especially that of the Grand Canyon. In fact, it is possible that the burros have already been in the Grand Canyon for centuries. There is evidence that the erosion attributed to the burros is more often due primarily to other invasive forces, such as humans and the natural erosion that occurs from geological forces and the canyon’s climate. There is also some concern that the donkeys pollute water holes, but the defecation of burros (and mules) has never actually been proven to pollute anything in their environment. Currently, there is an effort to prevent mules from being used in the Grand Canyon, but they are clearly the safest way to traverse and enjoy the beauty of this American natural wonder. Mules and donkeys learn their jobs well and cannot be dissuaded from their purpose of carrying inexperienced tourists to the bottom of the canyon and back up again—with a remarkable safety record. Their smaller hooves do little damage to the trails, and their handlers have the integrity to maintain the trails just as they maintain their precious mules. Cyclists, hikers and motorized vehicles in the parks have the potential to do much more irreparable damage to the environment than any mule or donkey. In truth, it is the human element, rather than mules and donkeys, which does most of the damage to our delicate ecosystem.

America’s journey has been one of courage, determination and great faith. It has been defined by its sequential growth phases of religion, defense, freedom, agriculture, economics, industry and ecology. We have worked alongside mules and donkeys for centuries and have often taken their generous contributions for granted in the course of our fast-paced growth. But the mule and donkey are likely to remain with us as long as they can find a way to make their contributions to society.

Those of us who attend Bishop Mule Days every year and many Longears lovers across this country are very well-acquainted with the incredible assets of the mule, and look forward to singing his praises every year on October 26th, when Mule Appreciation Day rolls around. Let us never forget to thank our trusted equine companions for all they have done to make possible this great country of ours!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2012, 2016, 2019, 2022 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

——-

1Mine Stories, The No. 9 Mine & Museum,Lansford, PA

2Mr. Longears, Volume 6, Number 21, Summer 1979

3ruralheritage.com email thread

It’s the wild horse way

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The wild horses of the Onaqui Herd Management Area (HMA) just outside of Dugway, Utah are some of the most well-known and well-loved mustangs in the country. Photographers and tourists from all over the world flock to this 200,000-acre public land area to spend time with the animals they have come to know and love, including revered wild horses like Old Man, Red Lion, or, Diamond and DeeDee — a stunning mother-daughter duo.


Photo by PJ Kaszas

It’s no matter that DeeDee was born to Diamond over 7 years ago. She has remained by her mother’s side ever since, napping, grazing, and raising her own young. It’s the wild horse way and why we love them: their relationships with one another are strong, intricate, and dynamic. 

So it was devastating to local advocates when the helicopters descended on the HMA in July of 2021, and threatened to rip this pair — and their unique bond — apart. They ended up being captured in the operation along with over 400 other cherished mustangs, and have been stuck in a mud-ridden holding facility since. Visitors to the corrals noted that the pair still clung together, amidst the trauma they endured. 

Local advocates worked tirelessly to find a home for Diamond and DeeDee together and lucked out when AWHC Board Member and owner of Freedom Reigns Equine Sanctuary, Alicia Goetz stepped up and agreed to welcome the mares to her herd of nearly 500 rescued horses on her almost 4,000-acre sanctuary. 


Photo by Kimerlee Curyl

And on Wednesday, we were onsite to welcome the special mother-daughter pair to their new life. After they cautiously came off the trailer, they took to the ground and began to roll. Photographer Kimerlee Curyl, spoke of the moment best: 

“I began to get teary as I watched the caked mud and manure fall off of them as they rolled around in the new green grass of their temporary enclosure. To me, it represented the shedding of their life in holding and that terrible roundup. It was a beautiful and emotional day.”

It really was a beautiful day.


Photo by Kimerlee Curyl

After their quarantine period is up, Diamond and DeeDee will be released out to the main sanctuary to roam over thousands of acres of rolling hills. 

We are grateful to the local advocates who worked so hard to keep this family together, and to Alicia for her commitment to ensuring that Diamond and DeeDee live the remainder of their lives at Freedom Reigns, the next best thing to being wild and free.

For the wild ones,

The AWHC Team

ChasitysFirstWorkout4 1 20 17

Chasity’s Challenges: Chasity’s First Workouts: 4-1, 3-20

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4-1-20:

I led Chasity from the stall and introduced her to her new work station. It was clear that there would be a lot of work ahead. Her neck crest was fallen to one side, but was not yet permanently broken, as far as I could tell. She had fat pockets across her body and her hooves were overgrown with shoes on the front feet. At least her feet could be balanced after removing her shoes and having her trimmed. For now, I would introduce Chasity to her new routine of grooming and exercise.

Since I wanted a clean place to set the crownpiece of the bridle without it getting tangled in her hair, I went ahead and clipped her bridle path. She was very good about having the clippers behind her ears.

I wasn’t thrilled to have to do the workout with her feet so unbalanced, but I knew the farrier would be here the very next day, so I opted to get started. I had my Ranch manager, Chad, clean her feet.

Then I proceeded to groom her with the multi-bristled human hairbrush and scrape with the shedding blade what I thought was dried milk from the insides of her hind legs.

I tacked her up in a light weight surcingle, Eggbutt snaffle bridle and a neck sweat to help keep the crested neck stabilized and encourage shrinkage during the workout. Then I added and adjusted my “Elbow Pull” self-correcting, postural restraint to support good equine posture during her workout.

Then it was time to go to the indoor arena where I had the Hourglass Pattern with ground rails set up for her therapy sessions. She hollowed her neck and back, and “trailered” her hindquarters behind when she walked. It was the same when she stood still with an inverted neck and back and camped out behind.

I began her postural therapy…leading her through the Hourglass Pattern in the “Elbow Pull” restraint to encourage her good posture. The neck sweat would begin to shrink the crest on her neck. She didn’t know exactly what was expected at first, but soon “got with the program” of walk and halt in designated places. She was asked to square up with equal weight over all four feet and then be rewarded for her effort. I waited each time for her to finish chewing her crimped oats before proceeding again along the track of the Hourglass Pattern.

As she walked, she submitted to the pressure from the “Elbow Pull” restraint which meant she was holding her own good posture when it was loose. She would lean against it when she could not hold that posture, but I encouraged her to relax and “give” to it each time we halted.

Chasity tracked once around one way and then once around the other way. She walked over the ground rails in the center of the pattern and stopped at strategic places between the cones to do square halts and stand still. I also stood still after dispensing her rewards so she would never feel rushed. She learned to stretch her back and engage her abs, and slowly began to improve even after only one session!

One of my ranch hands, Steve, said that he noticed her back and overall posture looked ever so slightly better when she was done, even after only one session! I think I see some very subtle improvement from the beginning to the end of the workout as well. It will take a long time to get her REALLY correct in her posture, but it is truly exciting when it begins to happen!

4-3-20:

I went ahead and did Chasity’s therapy session in the Hourglass Pattern again. She did well in her workout and I noticed that her hair coat is already considerably softer. She had some difficulty squaring up, but it could be soreness from the previous workout. Standing squarely is unnatural for her and it will just take some time before it becomes comfortable. After having her hooves trimmed, she is moving a bit more balanced…not quite as awkwardly. Going forward, I will be doing her workouts at least once a week, but no more than every other day. Muscles need to be appropriately stressed during the workout, but not fatigued, a day of rest is needed in between to fully recover. I expect it will probably take six months before we have redistributed the fatty tissue and solidified her balance in good equine posture. I am fortunate to have such a nice indoor arena in which to work during inclement weather.

NuggettLunging0001CC

LTR Training Tip #54: Setting Up for Successful Lunging

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Know when your equine is ready to start working on lunging, and how to best set them up for success.

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Your 2022 Advocacy Action Kit Enclosed >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

2022 is shaping up to be a busy year for our team at the American Wild Horse Campaign! We’ll be continuing our fight in the court, in the field, and on the Hill to preserve the freedom of America’s wild horses and burros.

We are on the frontlines of the fight to protect these iconic animals, but one thing is for sure: we couldn’t do it without our large herd of wild horse advocates who help to fuel our work. Grassroots supporters like you make up this incredible network and help to make our important efforts possible.

While our Government Relations team is busy setting their legislative agenda for the new year, we wanted to reach out with some advocacy resources so that you have everything you need to be the voice of our wild herds this year!

ADVOCACY ACTION KIT

Visit our Action Center to find contact information for your legislators or track wild horse legislation!

Want to set up a meeting with your elected officials but aren’t sure where to start? Use our step-by-step guide to setting up a meeting.

Check out our Roundup Fact Sheet to learn more about wild horse policy and protections before speaking with your members of Congress.

Donate to fuel our Government Affairs efforts!

The American Wild Horse Campaign is so much more than just our staff — it’s a community of activists who put in the work, time and time again, to defend our treasured wild horses and burros.

In 2021, supporters like you helped us to:

 Collect over 460,000 petition signatures to protect wild horses and burros;
Send over 338,000 messages to legislators on behalf of our wild herds;
And grow our grassroots network by more than 246,000!

So, will you stand with us again in 2022 to protect the lives of America’s wild horses and burros? We’ll be in touch over the next few weeks with actions you can take to protect these cherished animals.

Thanks for your support,

AWHC Action Center

CHILLY PEPPER – Info regarding Tax Donation Receipts for 2021

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Good morning,

I am working on tax donation receipts for 2021. IF YOU DONATED VIA CREDIT CARD, please contact me asap if you need your receipt.

Due to the bank upping their security to protect your personal information, the end of the year report is lacking contact information. Please contact me so I can make sure you have the necessary information for your taxes this year.

We have been informed how we can do things differently this coming year. It is more work but it is always a good thing when the banks are protecting your identity. I am sorry for any inconvenience this may cause, but again am glad the safety of your identity is being put first.

My phone number is 530 339-1458 or you can reach me via email.

Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
12965 Green Saddle Drive, #233
Golconda, NV 89414

checks to PO Box 233,

Golconda NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

CHILLY PEPPER – Inviting you to join us in honoring Betty White, by participating in the #BettyWhiteChallenge

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Today would have been Betty White’s 100th birthday!

BettyWhiteChallenge

In honor of her memory and her true passion, we have joined in the #BettyWhiteChallenge. We are hoping folks will help us continue our work saving these precious lives by donating in her honor.

We so appreciate all her hard work and dedication, and the beautiful example of a person that she was. She inspired many and we are hoping to keep on rescuing animals in her memory, and continue to end needless suffering.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS BEEN HELPING SAVE THESE PRECIOUS LIVES!

Please check out our Adoption page!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
Chilly Pepper
12965 Green Saddle Drive, #233
Golconda, NV 89414

checks to PO Box 233,

Golconda NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Introducing our OFFICIAL 2022 American Wild Horse Campaign Member Card (!!)

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

You voted, so here it is (!!) 

Introducing our OFFICIAL 2022 American Wild Horse Campaign Member Card:

We have so much in store for 2022. Not only are we continuing our fight on the Hill, in courts, and in the field — we’re also working on a number of groundbreaking new initiatives — all in the name of keeping wild horses and burros in the wild where they belong.

Will you renew your support as an AWHC member to help fuel our fight for wild horses and burros in 2022?

We’re laser-focused on the fight to preserve the freedom of our wild mustangs and burros. That means in 2022, we are … proving through our PZP program on Nevada’s Virginia Range that humane in the wild management works … expanding our investigative team to uncover abuse and hold the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) accountable … continuing our lawsuit against the BLM’s Adoption Incentive Program that’s sending horses and burros to slaughter … working with a prestigious university to make roundup violations enforceable by law … and so much more!!

But to have the means necessary to protect our cherished wild horses and burros for generations to come, we need your help. Will you renew your support as an AWHC member today to help fuel our fight in 2022?

RENEW YOUR 2022 SUPPORT

Thank you for your support of our wild herds.

— American Wild Horse Campaign

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Wrangler’s Donkey Diary: Arrival At Lucky Three Ranch

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Nation wide horse transportation

 

Checking things out

 

Leading – not exactly in sync

 

Entering barn alleyway

 

Handsome head shot

 

Meeting Meredith

 

Giving Meredith a donkey kiss

 

Good–bye present from prior owners

Unloading at Lucky Three Ranch

 

Steve leads the way – donkey trailer butt sores

 

Approaching the barn – in sync

 

Enter stall ahead of handler and turn around

 

Checking out his run

 

Posing for a picture

 

Giving Meredith a donkey hug

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MULE CROSSING: Donkeys As Livestock Guardians

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By Meredith Hodges

There has been a lot of discussion since the early nineties around using donkeys for small livestock protection and predator control. Donkeys can certainly be a formidable opponent for cats and dogs and other smaller animals. One needs to be careful about who the donkey is pastured with since it is in their nature to pursue and sometimes kill animals that are smaller and weaker than them. This is true in all donkeys, although some individual females tend to be more maternal and are not apt to go after smaller livestock. The males will always be more aggressive than the females and do not make good guardians for smaller livestock.

The other thing to consider is whether or not they have been raised with the livestock they are expected to guard. When raised with the other livestock, they will feel more a part of that “family” and are less likely to do them harm. A donkey that is going to be expected to guard livestock, but was not raised with them, should be carefully introduced to them “over the fence” for several weeks. Then if all seems to go well, you can introduce them in the same pen and watch for any signs of aggression. If there are signs of aggression after a few weeks of being separated, then they probably will never really get along. You must remember that a donkey is NOT a predator, nor a prey animal that will necessarily get along with other livestock. Donkeys prefer to be in a herd with other donkeys. They do not like being alone either. Donkeys have a strong sense of “family” and prefer to be with their own kind. When forced to be with other species, they will blend, but grudgingly.

There are three basic sizes of donkeys: Miniatures, Standard Donkeys and Mammoths. Our American donkeys are further identified by their height when being described rather than specific breeds. This is because they are so interbred from being turned loose during the time of the Spanish explorers. There are no real purebred donkeys in America other than the descendants of the original Andalusian donkeys that were bred from George Washington’s stock at Mt. Vernon. One must go to Europe to see the original BREEDS of donkeys. American donkeys are identified as: Miniature Donkeys (36” & under), Small Standard Donkeys (36.01” to 42”), Standard Donkeys (42.01” to 48”), Large Standard Donkeys (48.01” to 56”) and Mammoth Donkeys (Males 56” & over; Females 54” & over).

Miniature donkeys are not suitable guardians for livestock at all. They are too small and can fall victim to predators themselves. They simply cannot defend themselves. Standard donkey jennets are the most sought after for predator control, however, keep in mind that they are PREY animals and can fall victim to predators that are fairly large, or predators that run in packs. Mammoth donkeys are simply too slow to react. They lack the quickness and athleticism that it takes to combat a predator. Donkeys will never be able to guard against such predators as bears and mountain lions.

Good ranch dogs that are bred for guarding sheep and other livestock are a much better choice for guardianship. They are quick, clever and always on the alert. Their barking can alert the farmer as well. They can even move the livestock to a safer location on their own and will often chase off a predator pretty easily with their confusing way of attacking.

As with all livestock, donkeys need to be provided with adequate shelter from the elements, whether heat or cold, must be provided trace mineral salt blocks and clean, fresh water. Their time on pasture will need to be monitored for optimum health which will often clash with the grazing needs of sheep, goats and other smaller livestock. Donkeys are desert animals and really easy keepers. It is not uncommon when they colic or founder on too much, or too rich, grass. They cannot be on pasture 24/7.

Donkeys will need regular trims and must therefore, be reasonably trained. They will require vaccinations twice a year and regular worming. If they are not trained to accept these things, most veterinarians and farriers will be averse to handling them until they are. It takes time and patience to gain the trust of your donkey before you can actually consider him trained.

I have found it better to be smart about livestock control and not make it so easy for the predators. As I said, guard dogs bred for herd management are a much better choice. One should NEVER use mules as a guardian as they WILL be dangerous to smaller livestock and other smaller or weaker animals, even older mules! However, I have discovered that when my mules are pastured next to the smaller animals, predators give them a wide berth and thus, skirt the pens where the smaller animals are kept.

Since miniature donkeys and mules are always at risk, I add another element of safety for them by lining their pens with metal grating over the stock panels. Then, everyone is also brought in every night and turned out for a limited amount of time during the day. This gives me the opportunity to monitor their diet, check for injuries twice a day and keep them safe overnight. All my equines are taught to come in from turnout upon request. They know there is always a crimped oats reward awaiting them.

Wooden barns and wire fences can be easily torn down by larger predators. So over the years, I slowly replaced all of my wood barns and wire fences with metal barns, steel panels and vinyl fencing with hot wires on the top. I also run hotwires on the bottom of the vinyl fencing in areas where animals are likely to come through by climbing underneath. The way my barns and pens are laid out, the mule and large donkey pens surround the miniatures’ housing accommodations. It is not uncommon to see large “cats,” bears, coyotes and other predators in the foothills of Colorado where I live. It is even getting worse as more developments are built in the mountains and drive these predators off the mountains in the wintertime.

In summary, I do not recommend using donkeys as guardian animals. We need to remember that they are PREY animals themselves and can be grossly injured in any altercations with a predator. I think there are better choices for livestock guard animals and setting up the environment in which your livestock (donkeys included) is kept. These two considerations will promote the health and welfare of your livestock, and cost you a whole lot less in the long run!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2022 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

How we’re protecting wild horses and burros in 2022 >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

The new year is upon us, and so is the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) proposed roundup plan for the 2022 calendar year. Over the next 12 months, the BLM intends to round up 22,000 wild horses and burros — permanently removing 19,000 of these animals from their homes on our public lands.

This is Year 2 of the BLM’s plan remove 20,000 horses per year for the next five years, and it presents a real threat to the survival of America’s wild herds. But it’s not the end of their story. Far from it. Because the worse the BLM treats our cherished wild mustangs, the more support we get from Congress and the American public to change the current costly and cruel wild horse and burro management program.

Our team enters 2022 prepared for the many battles ahead — in court, on the Hill, and in the field — to protect wild horses and burros and keep them in the wild where they belong. Today, I wanted to share with you some of our biggest plans for 2022. This year, we intend to: 

  • Spearhead a national awareness campaign and grow our Ambassador Program to educate the American public about the plight of wild horses and empower them to get involved.
  • Continue to demonstrate through boots-on-the-ground work that humane management of wild horses is possible. We’ll continue to deliver unprecedented results from our PZP program on Nevada’s Virginia Range and broker programs for other herds across the West.
  • Put science at the forefront of wild horse management — We’ll be launching a number of new and exciting science initiatives, including an academic analysis of our Virginia Range PZP program data AND we’ll be creating an economic report to highlight the missteps of the BLM’s current approach and the cost-savings of a more humane one.
  • Amplify our work and your voice on Capitol Hill to pass legislation that diverts funds away from roundups and toward fertility control programs and ensure that the BLM uses these funds appropriately.
  • Expand our Investigative Team to continue to uncover waste, fraud, and abuse in the BLM’s on-range and off-range programs.
  • Continue our lawsuit against the BLM over its Adoption Incentive Program that’s sending wild horses and burros into the slaughter pipeline, while gearing up for new legal battles ahead…

Meredith: We have big plans for 2022! We’re using every resource at our disposal to continue our fight on behalf of America’s wild horses and burros. Our first step? Growing our grassroots army to build the scale of the wild horse protection movement so that it is inclusive, diverse, empowered, and well-equipped to achieve our mission of protecting wild horses and burros for generations to come.

Here’s how you can help:
1. Spread the word! Tell five friends to sign up for our email list so they can learn more about the plight of our wild horses and join our fight to protect them!
2. Donate to help fuel our fight in 2022 and beyond!

Thank you for your support,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

Facebook Snowplay Scaled

Another Augie and Spuds Adventure: SnowPlay

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12-4-19

Time is running out! Cast your vote for our 2022 Member Card now >>

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

There are only a few short days left to cast your vote for our 2022 AWHC Member Card! Will you let us know which option is your favorite?

VOTE FOR DESIGN #1

VOTE FOR DESIGN #2

VOTE FOR DESIGN #3

So, will you let us know which option is your favorite for our Official 2022 AWHC Member Card? Cast your vote now, before time runs out. We’ll be announcing the winner this Friday!

Thanks for your input! 
— AWHC Team

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MULE CROSSING: Do Mules Need to Be Shod?

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By Meredith Hodges

Do mules need to be shod? Those who are familiar with mules might be tempted to say, “No,” but the answer is a little more complicated than you might think. Although the mule generally has a tougher and more durable foot than the horse, all mules do not have the same feet, nor do all mules apply the same kind of stress to those feet. Therefore, each individual animal has to be considered when answering the question, “To shoe or not to shoe?”

It is commonly known that, when it comes to horses and mules, light-colored hooves are softer and more likely to break down under stress than are the darker, black hooves. Even though the
black hoof is naturally harder than the light-colored hoof, if it does not contain sufficient moisture, it can become brittle and can chip away as destructively as can the lighter hoof. Whichever breed of equine you own and whatever the color of their feet, remember that good hoof care is essential for all domesticated equines.

For better or worse, an equine inherits his hooves through his genes. If your mule has inherited good feet—black, oily-looking, and with good shape—then you are fortunate and hoof care and maintenance should be relatively simple. If he has inherited a softer or misshapen foot, you will need to discuss more specialized care with your farrier.

Climate and weather greatly affect the condition of your mule’s feet. Damp weather and muddy footing will tend to soften the walls of any hoof, and perpetual exposure to mud and dampness can cause deterioration of his feet. With the light-colored hoof, which tends to soften more easily, this could spell disaster. It is wise, therefore, during damp weather or if you live in a damp climate, to provide a clean, dry place for your mule to stand. Conversely, extremely hot and dry weather can cause your mule’s feet to become dry and brittle, and they may start to crack due to contraction and expansion of the hoof. For this type of dry weather or climate, you may want to overflow your water tanks regularly so your mule has a place to “cool his feet.” If it is excessively dry, you may even need to manually lubricate your mule’s hooves as needed with one of the commercial products available. But before you use an artificial hoof lubricant, first check with your farrier to make sure that it is actually needed. Many people use hoof products too frequently, which can cause hooves to become too soft. When this begins to happen, you will see horizontal rings appear around the hoof wall, and sometimes, vertical lines. Try not to let the hoof get to this point by using lubricants sparingly, but if you see that these rings are beginning to appear, immediately discontinue use of the lubricant and allow the hoof to harden. Then check with your vet to make sure it is not a founder condition. It does not take much to adequately soften the hooves of an animal with rock-hard feet. During the really dry seasons, lubricant application once a week is usually sufficient.

Assuming that your mule has a normal set of dark, healthy hooves, he will probably not need to be shod, as long as he is used strictly for pleasure or only sporadically. However, if you are going to use your mule on excessively rocky or hard ground, you might want to look into getting shoes for him. Mules that repetitively participate in more stressful and demanding activities (such as parades, showing and endurance events) should be shod to protect their feet and to keep them healthy. Prevention of bruising or cracking and maintenance of good foot and leg posture is critical to the equine athlete.

The pack and pleasure mule that is not used much or is used on softer terrain and in places where he does not require shoes must still be trimmed for balance regularly to assure that his feet are evenly worn and that he is not putting undue stress on any joints, muscles or tendons. Failure to have your mule’s hooves regularly trimmed in order to maintain their balance and shape can result in an imbalance in your mule’s feet, which will then cause an imbalance throughout his entire body, inhibiting his performance. However, if trimming is done consistently, the risk of imbalance, accident or injury will be greatly reduced.

I believe that horses and mules, doing what they would naturally do alone—on terrain that is neither hard nor rocky—do not need to be shod. But mules that are asked to repetitively perform with a human on-board in varying surface situations should be fitted with the proper kind of shoes to help protect them from the additional weight and other demands that will be put upon their bodies. For example, my trail mules wear regular shoes on all four feet when they are being regularly used for trail riding and a variety of other activities, lessening the potential for injury. Then, when there is an occasional misstep on hard ground or rocks or when we trail-ride in the more challenging mountains, the shoes help to absorb some of the shock that would otherwise be absorbed by the hoof itself. It is my experience that young mules (and horses from two to four years of age) bear most of their weight on their front legs until their bodies are carefully and properly conditioned, and this is when you will see the most wear and tear on their feet. Because of this, my young mules that are just beginning saddle training wear regular shoes on the fronts only until their bodies are balanced and their activities clearly defined. Our broodstock, youngsters (under three years of age) and equines that are not used under
demanding conditions can go barefooted year-round, but they all still get regular trims every six to eight weeks.

All my other stock is shod for the specific purpose for which they are used: The Reining mules wear slider plates during the competition season, and the jumpers are fitted with either regular shoes, a tap and die shoe with studs or a borium shoe for non-skid, depending upon the terrain they will be negotiating.  If I were to ask one of my mules to race, I would fit him with the lighter-weight racing plates. Each equine athlete is given a set of shoes particularly designed for the best performance in his event, just as is the case with the human athlete. In the winter, if my mules have the need to wear shoes, I add rim pads to their shoes to help prevent “snowballing.”

Granted, there are a lot of mules that may not need to be shod, but there are also many that do need shoes, so each individual mule’s feet must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Because of this fact, the generalizations that “mules don’t need to be shod” and “all equines should go barefoot” are not always correct. You must take into consideration how your particular mule’s genetics affect his hooves, what he will be used for and how harsh the demands put on him will be on his feet. These important factors will determine whether or not he needs shoes, and if he does need shoes, what kind of shoes will best suit him. And don’t forget to check your mule’s shoes on a regular basis to make sure that all is well and that his shoes are staying on tight, but most of all, that he is comfortable and happy.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2014, 2016, 2019, 2021, 2022 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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