Monthly Archive for: ‘June, 2021’

How a donation from Meredith helps us rescue wild horses and burros

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Just this year, AWHC’s Rescue Fund has helped save dozens of lives, from assisting foals on Nevada’s Virginia Range to saving the victims of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) failed Adoption Incentive Program from kill pens. 

Day in and day out we fight to protect wild horses and burros — whether that be through our rescue fund, in the courts, on the Hill, or in the field. None of this would be possible without supporters like you. Chip in to our Rescue Fund to help us continue saving the lives of wild horses and burros.

We couldn’t have helped these lucky horses and burros without your generosity, so we wanted to share with you some of the recent rescues we financially supported:

Hazel

From left to right: Hazel (she’s gotten so big!) and her roommate 

You might remember Hazel from when we shared her story with you on April Foals Day!

She was alone, separated from her family, and when Least Resistance Training Concepts team members were unable to locate Hazel’s mom, they got permission from Wild Horse Connection Range Management to take Hazel to LBL Equine Rescue

After clearing some medical hurdles, we are so excited to tell you that Hazel is thriving! She is healthy and is getting stronger every single day! She even goes on walks twice a day with LBL Equine Rescue team members, who all say she is quite the fighter and a true spitfire! 

Now, Hazel can be found cuddling with her two new roommates and playing in their enclosure, which we’ve equipped with rubber mats, thanks to your support through our Rescue Fund. 

It’s stories like these that make what we do all the more worth it, Meredith. Thanks to your donations, we were able to play a hand in saving Hazel’s life. Your generosity provides us with the means to support the wonderful local volunteers and groups who work night and day to protect the Virginia Range horses in Nevada. If you can, please help us save more lives like Hazel’s by donating to our rescue fund today!

DONATE

The Roan Filly and Her Friend

Back in April, we teamed up with wild horse sanctuary, Montgomery Creek Ranch (MCR) to rescue a roan BLM-branded filly from a Texas kill pen. This beautiful youngster was extremely skinny, in poor health, and was clinging to her friend, a domestic filly. 

We promptly rescued both of them, and are excited to share that they arrived safe and sound at MCR. While they are in need of a lot of TLC, the caring staff at MCR will nurse them back to health in no time! Please help ensure we have the funds to continue helping organizations like MCR rescue mustangs in need.

DONATE

The Victims of the Adoption Incentive Program

As part of our investigation into the Bureau of Land Management’s Adoption Incentive Program (AIP), we partnered up with Evanescent Mustang Rescue to save the lives of over 30 wild horses and burros who were dumped at kill pens across the country. 

Most recently, with your help, we funded the rescue of 12 burros from a kill pen in Oklahoma as well as 10 unhandled mustangs from a kill pen in Colorado. All of the burros and horses have found homes and even better — three horses and four burros are going to a place we like to call “horsey heaven” — an AWHC board member’s sanctuary, Freedom Reigns! 

These animals are symbols of the failure of the AIP. When AWHC staff investigated, it was discovered that all 12 burros were adopted by the same family and were dumped at the kill pen as soon as the family received their second payment of $500. But thanks to your generous support, they get a second chance at life. Donate today to help us continue saving the lives of wild horses and burros!

DONATE

Your generous support for our Rescue Fund saves lives. Please help us continue this work by making a donation to our Rescue Fund today.

DONATE

Thank you, 

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

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MULE CROSSING: The Ins and Outs of Leg Supports

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By Meredith Hodges

There are so many equine-related products on the market today that it is difficult to decide which ones you really need and which ones you don’t. For instance, the subject of splint boots and leg wraps can be very confusing. How do you know when to use them? What types of leg wraps or splint boots are best? Do they really help? In what ways do they help? What type of material should they be made from? And the list of questions goes on.

Splint boots and leg wraps vary as much as their uses. The easiest and most obvious use of a leg wrap comes when traveling with your equine. If you are taking your animal any real distance, it is always advisable to use full cover, padded shipping boots on all four legs. The shipping wraps help prevent your animal from injuring himself due to his own movements, on objects inside the trailer or because of other animals that are traveling with him.

If you have an animal that is fidgety and has difficulty standing still, applying leg wraps is the perfect opportunity to teach him to stand quietly while you handle his legs. You can begin training for leg wraps by putting them on your equine while he is outside the trailer in your grooming station, and then removing them in the trailer before unloading. Make sure he is standing quietly while you put the leg wraps on him. Also, get in the habit of always removing the leg wraps while he is still in the trailer. This makes him learn to “wait” for you before he departs the trailer. If he expects to have his wraps removed while he is still in the trailer, he is less likely to become excited and possibly bump or step on you while waiting to exit the trailer.

The best shipping boots are the ones that are full-leg, quilted on the inside and attached with Velcro straps. Some materials can collect bedding or debris and cause discomfort or pressure sores (the fleece-lined wraps are notorious for this). The best shipping boots are made from a quilted nylon material and most cover the entire leg and hoof.

You can also use quilted cotton pads and leg wraps, but they are primarily for use while your animal is stalled, in order to prevent cuts and abrasions at shows and events. Polo wraps (a soft pliable cotton wrap with no quilted pads) are also used for support during training. These types of wraps generally cover only the cannon bones and not the fetlocks and pasterns. If you do use Polo wraps or quilted cotton pads and wraps, learn to wrap them correctly to avoid pressure points that could cause problems. Consult with a professional to learn the proper wrapping technique.

There is a wide variety of splint boots available on the market and each of them is designed for a particular use. When doing light work in the arena or for trail riding, you might want to use a “front and back” set that are designed for minimal support, while providing the legs with greater protection from injury. In beginning training, you might use splint boots only on the front legs, since your animal will not likely be using his hindquarters efficiently enough to cause a problem. But once you have begun activities such as Reining or lateral work, the rear boots become important.

When making a decision about which type of protection to use, it is important to first assess your animal’s physical development and the types of activity he will be doing. Boots that are designed primarily for protection do not always lend much support to the muscles and tendons.

They do, however, protect the animal from cuts, bumps and bruises and are advisable for use during hard work, gymkhana events, trail rides in mountainous areas and other more stressful workouts. If you do use splint boots while trail riding and they get wet, do not leave them on the animal for very long or they will lose their ability to support and can cause sores from rubbing. In order to prevent this from happening, boots should be removed, cleaned and dried out immediately after use.

Since, in beginning training, the goal is to condition your animal’s muscles and tendons, “light support” splint boots are a good thing to have on-hand. At this early stage, if a boot gives too much support, the animal does not necessarily develop correctly and the areas under the boots can become weak. Muscles and tendons above and below the boot will gain too much strength and cause possible knotting of the muscles, compromising the function of that entire leg due to uneven conditioning.

After basic training, when your equine is participating in more stressful activities such as jumping, endurance and racing (or in the case of an injury), it may become necessary to use a more supportive boot to lightly support already-conditioned muscles and tendons. Support boots are designed to provide equal support over the entire area they cover. Be careful that they are neither too tight nor too loose. You don’t want the boots so tight that they cut off the blood supply to the area covered or are not flexible enough to allow the joints to move freely. However, you don’t want them so loose that they ride down on the legs.

Although the hooves look tough, they, too, can be adversely affected, particularly in gymkhana events and jumping. This is why “bell boots” may be needed for hoof and coronet band protection. The coronet is a very sensitive area and can cause severe lameness if damaged even by a small, seemingly insignificant, cut or bump. If a hoof is unusually dry, severe cracks can occur, and so it is also advisable to routinely use a hoof dressing in addition to the bell boots, in order to make sure a trauma to the hoof will not cause cracking.

When trying to decide which splint boots, leg wraps or other devices to use assess your plan for the day. Leg wraps and splint boots can change from time to time, depending on the conditions of the day. Most shows do not allow splint boots or leg wraps in certain classes. If an animal is in good physical condition, he should not need splint boots or leg wraps for the short time of the performance unless it is extended, as in gymkhana events. In this case, your animal should be conditioned well enough to forgo the actual support-type boots and would only need boots that would primarily offer protection from injury.

You may be asking yourself, “How can I tell a minimal support boot from a fully functional medical support boot?” This can be very confusing, considering all the different kinds of leg wraps and splint boots out there. Some even look identical, as in the case of the high quality Pro Choice splint boot versus an off-brand. Although the off-brand may look identical, it is often made from inferior-quality materials that do not afford the degree of flexibility needed for successful therapy. Although these off-brands are designed for support and do cover the joints, should be considered as more of a protective boot. Splint boots are strictly for protection of the cannon bones, because they do not cover the joints and offer very little support.

In the case of leg wraps, there are those that stretch and are used for support (as in the Polo wraps used for Dressage schooling), and those that do not stretch and are used over padded quilt squares for traveling and while in the stable. When researching which product will best suit your needs and the needs of your animal, equine professionals, your local tack shop or feed store, shows and expos, and the internet can all be valuable sources of information.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2003, 2014, 2016, 2019, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ACTION NEEDED: Tell your U.S. Rep to vote YES on the Carter-Fitzpatrick Amendment to the INVEST Act!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

In the last week, there has been some important wild horse news that we wanted to make sure you didn’t miss! 


Urgent: Contact Your Rep to Stop Horse Slaughter

Right now, in the House of Representatives, we have an opportunity to stop horse slaughter through the INVEST Act. This Act is a large government infrastructure bill that may also give us an opportunity to stop the transport of horses and burros across the border to slaughter. It goes up for a vote next week! 

We need you to contact your Representative right now and tell them to vote YES on the Carter-Fitzpatrick Amendment!

TAKE ACTION

 

We’re Challenging the BLM’s Wild Burro Eradication Plan

Last week, AWHC attorneys filed a legal challenge to the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) burro eradication plan, which calls for the roundup and removal of all of the burros in three California Herd Areas (HAs).

In it, we charge that the agency violated federal law by not considering the newly-published science that documented the key benefits of these very burros to their ecosystems, which includes well digging in the arid desert. The new science even went so far as to call wild burros “ecosystem engineers!”

LEARN MORE

 

Sierra Club Adopts Friendly Wild Horse Policy

The Sierra Club, the nation’s leading environmental organization, recently updated its wild horse and burro policy. This policy had not been changed in 40 years and it called for the elimination of wild horses and burros from key habitats.

Now, the new policy calls for scientific and humane in-the-wild management, including removal of livestock before horses, predator protection, and the use of fertility control! We are so excited to work with the organization to protect wild horses and burros on public lands in the future.

LEARN MORE

 

Lawmakers, Advocates Push to End BLM Wild Horse Adoption Incentives

Recently, AWHC’s Executive Director, Suzanne Roy, and wild horse champion, U.S. Representative Dina Titus were interviewed on a Las Vegas NPR affiliate, KNPR, about the BLM’s failed Adoption Incentive Program (AIP).

In this 25 minute segment, they cover what the AIP is, it’s disatorious effects, how lawmakers are calling for its end, and what a better solution is for our wild horses and burros! The riveting interview is not one you want to miss!

LISTEN NOW

Thank you for your support,

—The AWHC Team

ANOTHER URGENT CALL – 5, MAYBE MORE BABIES IN THE TRAP! CAN WE SAVE THEM? THE HEAT IS BRUTAL

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

THE CALLS KEEP COMING!

ANOTHER 5 BABIES (OR MORE) TOMORROW! It was easily 100 degrees today, and the weather is supposed to be brutal. It is so hard on these babies, especially after sitting in a trap for who knows how long.

Got a call from the vet today. Our current balance at the Goldendale Veterinary Hospital is $1130. I HAVE to get that paid off asap. They are amazing and will squeeze me in at a moment’s notice to help these babies, but I have to stay current on the bill.

Tia, shown above, has horrific injuries to her legs. Her back leg is brutal, definitely to the bone and I need y’all to pray hard for her. She is on antibiotics and her wounds are being cleaned and packed with clay. Her condition is extremely critical and depending on how badly her bone has been damaged, it could be a life and death issue. Thankfully her fever was not off the charts.

So once again these precious souls need more help. I am still going through milk like crazy, and I need to say YES to the babies tomorrow.

Apparently I do not need to go back to NV for awhile, but it is obvious that these babies need a safe place to land. I will do my part, but I can’t do it without you!.

If you would like to help with our ongoing vet bills,

HARRAH VETERINARY 509 848-2943
GOLDENDALE VET CLINIC 509 773-0369

If you would like to order FOAL LAC & send milk, (Or baby wipes, vaseline, gloves, Foal Response, Foal Lac Pellets, syringes, Probios etc.)

Send to CHILLY PEPPER,

C/O MELODY LEBEAU

1630 Pumphouse Rd

Toppenish, WA 98948

509-985-8214
CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

The Colorado Equine Community Mourns the loss of Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

Norm Brown Lifetime Achievement Recipient

Passed Away – June 14th, 2021

“Norm Brown made great contributions to the equine community in our state. His enthusiasm, dedication and support of the work of the Colorado Horse Council is well documented and appreciated. His leadership moved our organization into a leadership role throughout the country!”

CEO/Executive Director, Bill Scebbi.

North Forty News, Wellington: Norman (Norm) Edward Brown passed away on June 14, 2021, at the age of 89. He was born to Charles E. and Ethel Mae Brown in Conklin, New York on February 8, 1932. Two years later, his family moved to Brown family farm along the banks of Williams Pond in Montrose, PA. The farm has been owned by the Brown family since 1860.Norm and his dad farmed with horses and milked cows by hand. Norm attended a one-room 8 grade country school across the pond from his house. During winters, he would skate to school after ice covered the pond, and at lunchtime, the kids would climb the hill outside the school and sled back to school.

Norm attended high school in Montrose. PA. After high school graduation, Norm received a Senatorial Scholarship to Penn State. He enrolled in Air Force ROTC program, and while at Penn State, Norm received a varsity letter as First Assistant Basketball Manager.

After receiving his BS in Dairy Husbandry in 1954, Norm was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the Air Force. He was stationed in Florida. After 2 years, he was offered relief from active duty as there was “no conflict”. He continued in the Air Force Reserves until 1976 receiving an honorable discharge as a major.

Upon completion of his active duty, Norm became an Extension Agent in Clearfield County, PA. After 6 years, Norm went to Colorado where he received his M. Ed. in Extension Education and got married. Norm and Donna moved back to Clearfield County where they had 2 children, Russell and Trisha. Later, Norm was offered a position in Jefferson County.

In addition to his work as a county agent, Norm was the horse show announcer at the Keystone International from 1969- 1973. He announced the horse pulling contest at PA State Farm Show 73-74.

Later, Norm and his family moved to Wellington, Colorado where they helped Donna’s mother (Marie) run her farm. They took over all farm operations after Marie’s death in 1999.

Norm continued to work as a county agent, this time in Adams and Larimer counties. Eventually, he became County Extension Director in Adams County, a post that he held for 6 years before his retirement in 1987. His career in extension was distinguished with numerous awards including the Distinguished Service from the National County Agents Association.

After his retirement, Norm worked as an agricultural consultant. His biggest client was Rabobank. He also took the lead role in running the farm in Wellington which he continued to do up until his death.

While in Pennsylvania, Norm and Donna bred their two Arabian mares and they continued to breed Arabians in Colorado. Norm and Donna were the first husband and wife team to be presidents of The Colorado Arabian Club (Norm in 1977 and Donna 1981-83). Norm primarily showed Arabians at halter, and in 1975, he showed Marie’s Arabian mare to a Top Five at the Arabian Region 8 Championships. In 2011, Norm completed a Century Club Ride on Trisha’s Arabian gelding Amie Phoenix+. This enabled him to be the 88th horse and rider team to join this prestigious list (where the age of horse and rider total at least 100 years).

Norm was also active in the Colorado Horse Council (CHC), a founding member of the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo, an original board member of the Colorado Horse Development Authority, and on the management team of the Western National 4H Horse Classic. While Norma was a leader in CHC, the state legislature passed the Equine Liability law and Hold Your Next Horse Show in Colorado (the first guide of horse show facilities in the state) was published. These and other achievements led to Norm being named the Colorado Horse Person of the Year (1995) and Lifetime Achievement award in 2013.

After Norm’s parents passed away, he inherited the family farm in Montrose, PA. Russ now owns the farm, continuing the 160-year-old family ownership.

Norm was well-known as an avid Penn State sports fan, and he perfected his trademark technique of yelling at the TV ensuring his part to ensure a Penn State victory. His love of sports permeated his life, from swimming and diving in Williams Pond as a child and teen, trying out for the New York Yankees as a young adult, surfing the Atlantic while in the Air Force, to running 5K races with his daughter in his mid-50’s. Later in life, he enjoyed attending collegiate wrestling matches with Russ, basketball and volleyball games with Donna, and bluegrass concerts with Trish. He was also well-known for his skills of irrigating, tractor driving, and being a beer aficionado.

Norm is survived by his loving wife Donna; his two children Russ (Jackie Meier) and Trisha who were the apples of his eyes; his sister-in-law Jeannette (Nico Bink) as well as countless people to whom he was a mentor and second father. He was proceeded in death by his parents Charlie and Ethel; his brother Kenneth; and his daughter-in-law Aadria.

In lieu of flowers or donations, the family would appreciate your support of the Norman and Donna Brown Mountain View Arabians Scholarship in the College of Agricultural Sciences at Penn State. Gifts may be written out to “Penn State University” with “Norm Brown scholarship” in the memo and mailed to: College of Agricultural Sciences, 240 Ag Administration Bldg., University Park, PA 16802.

 

THANK YOU FOR HELPING SAVE THESE LIVES! ENJOY SOME HAPPY PICTURES!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

HI,

I wanted to take a few minutes and send out a huge thank you. Your love and support are what makes this happen. Each and every one of these lives were SAVED BY YOUR DONATIONS, prayers and support.

These are the kids I have gotten in the last 2 weeks? Time is a blur lol.

THANK YOU SO MUCH!

It has been a brutal year, and I have lots of critters to take care of, and it never stops. It’s just me, so I am behind as usual. However I needed to let y’all know how much every penny, needle, bag of milk, box of gloves, syringes etc. mean to not only me, but to each and every life you are saving. ALL the kids love being taken care of and having good feed. The energy here is wonderful, and I am blessed beyond belief to have y’all making sure this life saving work continues.

So thank you, I hope we can keep saving lives together. I will keep doing this work as long as I can, as long as the funding is there. Y’all rock!!

Actually how could I forget? I have a great helper. He is shown below, hard at work! He was born to the wild, pregnant Mama cat I trapped this year.

If you would like to help with our ongoing vet bills,

HARRAH VETERINARY 509 848-2943
GOLDENDALE VET CLINIC 509 773-0369

If you would like to order FOAL LAC & send milk, (Or baby wipes, vaseline, gloves, Foal Response, Foal Lac Pellets, syringes, Probios etc.)

Send to CHILLY PEPPER,

C/O MELODY LEBEAU

1630 Pumphouse Rd

Toppenish, WA 98948

509-985-8214
CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

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LTR Training Tip #39: Showmanship Patterns

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If you are going to attend a show, it is advisable to get a copy of the rulebook that is designated by the show committee, so you know what to expect for each class you enter.

Download Detailed Description

See more Training Tips

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MULE CROSSING: Hauling Long Distances

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By Meredith Hodges

Hauling long distances needn’t be a problem with your Longears, if you use a little common sense and consideration. Their natural durability and good sense make them basically easier to haul than horses. When hauling for more than four or five hours, there are a few things to consider.

First, you should be sure that the trailer in which they are to ride affords safety and comfort. Before you leave, you should check over your trailer thoroughly. Make sure the hitch is secure and in good repair, and that there are no weakened welds anywhere. Check your trailer’s tires, bearings, axels and brakes for maximum performance, and make sure all the lights are in working order. Take the trailer mats out and check the floor boards for rot and other weaknesses, and replace any boards that are even questionable.

Using bedding such as shavings or straw in the trailer may afford a little extra comfort, and can encourage urination on the trip, but it isn’t always the best thing to do. The wind can cause the bedding to fly around inside the trailer, causing irritation to your animal’s eyes, ears and respiratory tract, particularly if you use shavings. If you wish to use bedding, straw is the better choice. In addition to the straw bedding, choose thicker trailer mats (rather than those that are thin) for your trailer. Thicker mats allow for more absorption of trailer vibration, as well as dispersing the moisture from urination. The trailer you use should give each animal ample space in which to stand. If your mules and donkeys are crowded in too tightly, they will be tense and anxious throughout the trip and will tire easily. This can result in battles between animals, increasing the potential for injury.


Mules and donkeys, like horses, should be “dressed” for their trip. For their overall comfort during long trips, halters should be fleeced, at least over the noseband, to protect from excessive rubbing that can result from being tied. Shipping wraps for their legs are also advisable to prevent injuries from a loss of balance, misstep or kick from another animal in the trailer. Depending on the weather and the kind of trailer you have (either a stock trailer or enclosed trailer) you can use sheets or blankets to protect the rest of your animal’s body.

Donkeys tend to sit back on whatever is behind them while they ride, so they should always wear an oversized sheet or blanket that drops down behind the rump to prevent chafing. If they are not protected in this way, they can develop terrible raw spots on their tails and hindquarters. Using a tail wrap on mules and donkeys is rarely successful, as these tend to slide off (even if they are taped). If they are put on too tightly, they can cut off the circulation in the tail and cause problems.

When loading your mules and donkeys, pay special attention to each individual’s needs. Animals that lean one way or the other generally do better in a slant load trailer rather than in an in-line trailer, but if you must use an in-line trailer, make sure that the animal that leans has a solid wall or partition on the side to which he leans. You always want to put animals next to each other that get along well, so if you must load a leaner on the wrong side, be sure to put him next to an animal that is able to tolerate his leaning without retaliating if there are no partitions. If you have an open stock trailer, another alternative is to load your animals into the trailer and tie them facing backwards. Many equines actually prefer to ride facing backwards because they find it easier to balance. Note: This alternative is not advisable in a partitioned in-line or slant-load trailer.

Once on the road, try to keep your equines’ routine as close to their “at home” routine as possible. Keeping grass hay in front of them will help to alleviate some of the stress of the trip, and will encourage them to relax and accept the situation. Feeds such as grain and alfalfa hay should be avoided, since these highly mobilize the intestines and can cause contractions that can lead to colic, particularly if your animals are not drinking enough water along the way. They should at least be offered some water (whether they drink it or not) at every stop you make along the way and ideally, once every two to three hours. Note: Water that your mules and donkeys are not used to may smell or taste strange to them and can be flavored with something they like. For instance, my donkey jack, Little Jack Horner, has a preference for iced tea to flavor unappetizing water on the road. Lightly flavoring your equines’ water may encourage them to continue to eat and drink throughout the trip, and will help keep them happy and healthy.

If your trailer is large and has good suspension, your mules and donkeys can ride for as long as twelve to fourteen hours without too much discomfort, provided that you make frequent fifteen-to-twenty-minute stops every two to three hours along the journey. This should not interrupt your travel schedule, as you will already be stopping for gas along the way. If your animals are riding in a smaller trailer with more vibration, it is advisable to stop, unload and walk your animals every four to six hours, in order to give them time to stretch, relax and rest their legs. If you have a difficult animal, loading him last is often easiest, since he won’t want to be left behind and will be more likely to follow the other animals into the trailer. This can be inconvenient if you have any animals that are difficult to load because of the extra time involved, but it is always a good opportunity to train them to get in and out of the trailer simply by repetition. By the end of a long trip, they will be loading and unloading much more easily. Just make sure that, if you have equines that are difficult to load, you have allotted yourself enough travel time to include this kind of training.

Long before you actually go anywhere, get your animals used to being handled inside the trailer. When unloading, always make them stand and wait. I usually remove my animals’ shipping wraps before I let them come out of the trailer, but if they are packed in pretty tightly, I just remove the leg wraps I can reach. The removal of leg wraps before unloading adds purpose to your Longears’ waiting time (which they quickly come to understand). Frequently offering water at stops gets your animals used to you moving about the trailer while they are loaded. Most equines realize that all of this is for their benefit and you should find them mostly cooperative and appreciative.

There are times when weather can change drastically and depending on what the weather and temperatures are doing, your animals may need sheets or blankets either put on or removed. When you teach your animals to stand quietly while you climb around inside the trailer ahead of time, putting on leg wraps or taking them off should help them feel more relaxed and accepting of the whole situation.

When loading or unloading your animals, you must always be very careful not to move too quickly or abruptly, which could possibly startle them and even get you trapped. But if you do have an emergency to attend to en route and your animals have been trained in the manner described above, you should be able to get to the animal in trouble with minimal problems. It sometimes takes a little more patience to get horses to stand quietly in the trailer. Once they realize that you are truly concerned with their best interests, mules and donkeys (intelligent creatures that they are), will usually be very cooperative and your long hauls can become relaxing and enjoyable road trips.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

© 2000, 2003, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2019, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Mark your 📅 for June 24! It’s our All About Burros Webinar!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Please join us on Thursday, 6/24 at 2pm EST/11am PST for another webinar in our Keeping Wild Horses Wild 101 Series — all about burros! Click here for more information and to RSVP for the event!

We’ll be the first to admit that it can be difficult to stay up to speed with the complex issues affecting our nation’s wild horses and burros! With so many federal agencies, acronyms, and applicable laws, it’s easy to get confused.

That’s why we created our Keeping Wild Horses Wild 101 Series. In this series we’ll break the issues down for you with presentations covering topics from the history of our beloved equines to the present-day fight for their protection and preservation!

In this specific webinar, we’ll be focusing on the lesser-known of our federally-protected animals: wild burros! Wild burros have the same rich history and are as culturally significant as wild horses, but unfortunately, Meredith, they receive far less attention.

In this session we’ll cover: 

  • Burro Awareness Month
  • Interesting Burro Facts
  • The History
  • The Act
  • Roundups
  • What Science Says
  • Calls to Action

So please RSVP now to join members of the AWHC team for this important webinar on June 24th to learn all about wild burros and how you can help protect these cherished animals!

RSVP NOW >>

Thank you,
American Wild Horse Campaign

Urgent! We need Coloradans to speak up for mustangs TODAY

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We have an important ask: Can you please take one moment to reach out to your Senators in Colorado and urge them to protect wild horses?

Currently, a letter is being circulated in the Senate that would allocate significant funding from the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro budget to humane management using safe and effective PZP fertility control. Unfortunately, your Senators have not yet joined and we need them to hear from their constituents.

Please, take one moment to contact your Senators today:

Sen. Michael F. Bennet

  • Denver Office: 303-455-7600
  • DC Office: (202) 224-5852

Sen. John W. Hickenlooper

  • Denver Office: 303-244-1628
  • DC Office: (202) 224-5941

All you have to say is, “I’m a constituent, and I’m calling to ask that you please sign onto a letter being led by Senator Cory Booker that promotes humane, cost-effective management of wild horses and burros in the wild where they belong. It calls for allocating $11 million of the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program budget to fertility control. Today is the deadline to join the letter. You can contact Sen Booker’s office to join on. Thank you.”

Then, follow up with a message using the button below.

CONTACT YOUR LEGISLATORS >>

Thank you so much for taking quick action to help wild horses!

Thank you,

Holly Gann Bice
Director of Government Relations
American Wild Horse Campaign

BARNEY THE OLD MULE NEEDS HELP RIGHT NOW! I NEED $1500 for bail, vetting and transport BY THIS EVENING!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

BARNEY NEEDS YOU IN THE NEXT FEW HOURS!

I need to come up with his funds by this evening. Barney has quite a few issues, but overall just needs us to save him.

I even have a potential home offer for him already.

I need to make sure I can pay for him this afternoon.

He is old, sweet, crippled, has a deformed stifle area and walks super slow. His back is a tad roached, but oh my gosh his heart is as big as Texas!!

Please let’s save him. We need a HAPPY!

I had to end Tommy’s suffering yesterday. Rescue is heartbreaking but now we have a chance for a win for Barney!

If we get any extra funds they will go for vet bills, milk etc. and to save more lives!

We so appreciate ALL YOUR LOVE AND SUPPORT! There are more babies coming and it looks like the year is going to be brutal. I cannot do this without you. Please say a prayer and let’s keep saving lives! It’s up to you!

If you would like to help with our ongoing vet bills,

HARRAH VETERINARY 509 848-2943
GOLDENDALE VET CLINIC 509 773-0369

If you would like to order FOAL LAC & send milk, (Or baby wipes, vaseline, gloves, Foal Response, Foal Lac Pellets, syringes, Probios etc.)

Send to CHILLY PEPPER,

C/O MELODY LEBEAU

1630 Pumphouse Rd

Toppenish, WA 98948

509-985-8214
CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Tell Congress to Support Humane Management of Mustangs and Burros!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Wild horses & burros need your help. Read on to see how you can take action to protect these cherished animals!

Act Now: Tell Congress to Support Humane Management of Mustangs and Burros

As we speak, a sign-on letter is circulating in the U.S. Senate requesting that at least $11 million of Fiscal Year 2022 funding for the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Wild Horse and Burro Program be earmarked for humane fertility control as a step away from brutal helicopter roundups and the removal of wild horses and burros from public lands. Over 40 members of the House have signed onto a similar request. Now we need your help to get your Senators to sign on!

TAKE ACTION

In-Depth: Forest Service Plans Mass Removal for California Wild Horses

The U.S. Forest Service is planning to continue its assault on the Devil’s Garden wild horses in California. During a Motorized Vehicle Public Meeting last week, officials from the Modoc National Forest announced their intent to remove between 800-1,000 wild horses from their 285,000-acre federally-designated habitat beginning in September. 

The Forest Service will “dispose” of most of these horses by selling them — up to a truckload at a time — for $1 a piece! The plan is the result of a secret settlement between the Forest Service and ranchers who graze their privately-owned cattle on the public lands where the Devil’s Garden wild horses roam. Take a moment to read our in-depth blog on this unfolding situation and be on the lookout for a way to take action!

LEARN MORE

OpEd: America’s Wild and Wondrous Wild Burros

It’s well past the time to hit the reset button on the management not only of wild horses, but wild burros as well. Last week, AWHC’s program specialist, Mary Koncel teamed up with an adviser to the Cloud Foundation to write an opinion piece for the Washington Examiner to raise awareness about these amazing animals of the desert southwest and inspire citizens to take action to protect them. Read more below.

LEARN MORE

Tell the BLM Advisory Board: Protect Wild Horses and Burros

The BLM National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board will meet from June 30 – July 1. This citizen Advisory Board is supposed to represent broad stakeholder interests but its membership, which is appointed by the Secretaries of Interior and Agriculture, is heavily weighted in favor of livestock interests. 

For far too long the BLM’s solution to managing wild horse and burro populations has been costly and brutal helicopter roundups that lead to slaughter for far too many of these iconic animals. Please take one moment to sign onto our letter demanding meaningful change and protection for wild horses and burros.

TAKE ACTION

Thank you for your support,

—The AWHC Team

Rein It In Copy

Longears Music Videos: Rein It In: Reining

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See more Longears Music Videos

QUICK UPDATE – CATCHER CALLED – BABIES IN THE TRAP NOW! CAN I SAY YES TO SAVING THEM! ITS UP TO YOU!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Catcher Called – BABIES IN THE TRAP & MORE ON THE WAY!

WILL YOU HELP SAVE THEM?

We are having endless vet bills. I was asked to pick up “Tommy” so he might have a tiny chance to survive. He was seen by Doc yesterday and she has little to no hope we can save him. It appears that not only is his joint septic, the infection is spreading up his bone. I am going the extra mile, and will drive him to where we can get x-rays. He has the most beautiful soul and we are bonding like crazy due to rushing to get him gentled for vetting.

When I was asked to pick up “Tommy”, I honestly wanted to say no, because I knew he had “old injuries”. I didn’t want to deal with having to “do the right thing” if he needed it. I am so devastated every time I hear someone say “he is fine – he is scabbing up”. SCABBING UP IS USUALLY A DEATH SENTENCE. IT IS JUST LOCKING IN THE POISON. THEN I GET THEM TOO LATE. It kills me.

TIME IS OF THE ABSOLUTE ESSENCE with these precious babies.

My heart has been shattered over and over this year. Yet I WAS LITERALLY HIS ONLY CHANCE, so of course I had to say yes. PLEASE SAY A PRAYER we get a miracle tomorrow.

I was finally able to secure the filly with the broken leg. Doc checked her yesterday and her ONLY option was to stop her horrible pain and suffering. She passed peacefully and finally is free from the horrors of her life here on earth.

Dakota Joe, the starving old man is here with me and beginning to love life again.

I am once again incurring tremendous vet bills. The meds are costly and so is the milk. I know for a fact there are babies in the pen AT THIS VERY MOMENT.

WILL YOU HELP ME SAVE THEM? Their very lives depend on us.

We so appreciate ALL YOUR LOVE AND SUPPORT! There are more babies coming and it looks like the year is going to be brutal. I cannot do this without you. Please say a prayer and let’s keep saving lives! It’s up to you!

If you would like to help with our ongoing vet bills,

HARRAH VETERINARY 509 848-2943
GOLDENDALE VET CLINIC 509 773-0369

If you would like to order FOAL LAC & send milk, (Or baby wipes, vaseline, gloves, Foal Response, Foal Lac Pellets, syringes, Probios etc.)

Send to CHILLY PEPPER,

C/O MELODY LEBEAU

1630 Pumphouse Rd

Toppenish, WA 98948

509-985-8214
CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

RichardShrakeClinic8 11 2010 195CC

MULE CROSSING: Myths About Desensitization

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By Meredith Hodges

You really don’t want to desensitize your animals to everything. Here is Webster’s Dictionary’s definition of the word “desensitize”:

1) to make (a sensitized or hypersensitive individual) insensitive or non-reactive to a sensitizing agent.

Some people have the misconception that, in order to desensitize an animal, you have to make it numb to its surroundings and any stimulus it encounters. Not true! What you really want to do is sensitize your equine to different body language and cues from you, as the trainer. So “desensitization” does not mean achieving a total lack of sensitivity. Rather, it should be approached as a way of training your equine (in a way that is quiet and calm) to be less sensitive to certain objects or events that may be cause him to be fearful, so he can move forward with confidence and the right sensitivity toward the communication between the two of you.

When incorrect, harsh or overly aggressive desensitizing techniques are used on equines, the handler is met with either a very strong flight reflex or a stand and fight reflex.  In either case, an equine will either put up a fight and be deemed a rogue and, therefore, untrainable, or eventually just “give up” and succumb to the trainer’s wishes. This is  a sad situation because the equine is not given the opportunity to make reasonable choices in his relationship with his trainer. The equine’s instinct to warm up to the person training him is hampered by his fear of more desensitization techniques. Thus, he becomes resigned to his work and is not fully engaged in the training process.

Often, trainers will put obstacles such as a trailer, tire or tarp in an equine’s pen in the hope of getting him used to it by making him live with it. But ask yourself this: How much rest would you get if someone put a blaring radio in your bedroom to desensitize you to noise? Equines have many of the same reactions to their personal space that we do, and they do much better when their place of rest is just that—a place of rest and comfort. And when lessons are approached in a considerate, respectful and rewarding way, an equine is more likely to approach them with an eager and positive attitude that facilitates better learning. It is always better to turn your equine’s fear into curiosity than it is to just assault his senses.

When doing obstacle training, it is better to allow your equine a gradual approach with small steps and great rewards for his honest effort than to whip and spur him through just to get to the other side. When his fear is converted to curiosity, the chance of his refusal to go forward is lessened and his trust in you as the trainer allows you to, eventually, ride through any obstacle at the slightest suggestion. This is because he trusts your judgment and has not been frightened, hurt or made uncomfortable during the training process. This is your equine developing sensitivity to your demands and learning to willingly comply so he can become a participating partner in each activity.

Some trainers believe that breaking down tasks for the equine into tiny steps is a waste of time and that giving a food reward prevents an equine from learning to respect the trainer, but I disagree. When you break tasks down into understandable steps in the beginning stages of training, you will eventually begin to get solid, reliable behavior from your equine. You will have to pay attention to a lot of little details at the beginning stages of training (and that can seem overwhelming at first), but if you take the time to pay attention to these small steps in the beginning stages and through the ground work and round pen work that will follow, when you finally do move on to riding under saddle the lessons will go much more quickly.

Each stage of training should become easier for you and your equine to master. For instance, it actually takes you less time to train in something like a side pass if you have done your groundwork training with the lead line and drive-line lateral training before you even get into the saddle. It also follows that the side pass will come more easily for your equine if he has first learned to move on an angle in the leg yield before having to move straight sideways. This is an example of taking things in small, logical steps, keeping your equine sensitive to his surroundings and tasks without fear. It also greatly lessens the chance for a fear or anxiety-driven blow up from your equine later on.

There is a physical as well as mental aspect to all of this technique. While you are training your equine to perform certain movements and negotiations over obstacles, his muscles, ligaments and tendons are all involved in his actions. When an equine is asked to do a movement for which his muscles have not first been properly conditioned, he will not only execute the motion incorrectly, but his premature attempt will undoubtedly compromise his muscles, ligaments and tendons. Even if he can adequately assimilate a requested movement while he is young, he could easily be creating problems in his body and joints that will cause him escalating problems as he ages.

If you were asked to go on a 25-mile hike with a 50-pound pack on your back, how would you prepare in order to safely and successfully perform this task? You would break it down into small steps, working up to it by first running a short distance with a very light weight, and then gradually increasing the distance you run and the weight you carry, which may take as long as a couple of years of careful training and conditioning. But if you tried to prepare for this kind of grueling hike by simply walking around the block a few times for a couple of days, you’d wreck your muscles, compromise your health and probably fail—all because you attempted to do the task when you weren’t physically or mentally ready. And depending on how much you strained your body, you just might discover down the line that the damage is permanent and will worsen over the course of your life. I use this illustration to show that, just as with humans, when it comes to training and conditioning your equine, it’s always better to take it slowly—one step at a time. Your equine will learn to enjoy being a partner in your challenges and goals if you give him the time he needs to be able to do these activities comfortably and with success.

An equine that learns in this sensitized way can also make judgments that might even save your life when you might not be paying attention. This is because when your equine is calm and well rested, he actually seems to be able to anticipate consequences, making him more likely to stop and wait for your cue. The equine that is “forced” during training will most often become anxious about a challenging situation and will seldom stop and calmly alert you to a potential peril—and he most likely will not trust your judgment.

It is because I have trained my mules in this sensitized way that I once avoided going over a 100-foot drop up in the Rocky Mountains while on a trail ride. On that particular day, I was in front, riding my mule, Mae Bea C.T. with four horses behind us. When we came to a giant boulder semi-blocking the trail, I told the people on the horses to wait and rode ahead. I soon found that the trail had narrowed to an impassable two feet wide and a rockslide had wiped out the trail ahead completely! It was straight up 100 feet on one side of the trail and straight down 100 feet on the other side and there was no going forward. The horses behind me were still on the wider part of the trail on the other side of the boulder and were able turn around, so they were safe, but backing my mule around the boulder on that treacherous trail would be very dangerous. I thought we were stuck. At that point, my mule calmly looked back around at me as if to ask, “Well, Mom, what do we do now?” I thought for a minute and then shifted the weight in my seat toward my mule’s hindquarters. This movement from me allowed her to shift her weight to her hindquarters. Then, with pressure from my right leg, she lifted her shoulders, pivoted on her left hind foot and performed a 180-degree turn to the left on her haunches, and with her front feet in the air, she swept them across the open precipice of the cliff and turned us back around to face the wider (and safe) part of the trail. After completing the turn, she stopped again, looked back at me to see if everything was okay and waited for my cue to proceed back down. I believe, without a doubt, that my mule’s incredible and calm response to a life-threatening situation was the direct result of the sensitized training methods I used that created our unbreakable bond of trust.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2013, 2016, 2018, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

Coalition of State Horse Councils, Virtual Meeting, Tuesday, June 15th, 1:00PM Eastern Time ( 11:00AM Mountain Time)

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

Coalition of State Horse Councils

Annual Summer Meeting

Tuesday, June 15, 2021 1PM Eastern Time

Good Afternoon Everyone,

I hope this email find you all well!

Please find attached the Agenda for our Coalition of State Horse Councils meeting next week, Tuesday June 15, 2021, 1PM (Eastern Time). This meeting is in conjunction with the 2021 AHC Conference, which is virtual as well. There are great presentations and wonderful opportunities for you to learn about our equine industry. Again we encourage your to take advantage of these presentations and REGISTER.

This June meeting of the Coalition is a Zoom Meeting and you may login without attending the entire AHC Conference.  Please find our agenda below. Your input at this meeting is very important to our growth and development and suggest that you invite others from your state organization to attend, especially if your cannot attend. Please forward this invitation to anyone you think can be helpful for input.

I look forward to being with you. After this our uncertain times and we are excited to continue with the building our Coalition of State Horse Councils!

Best Regards, Bill Scebbi, CSHC Chair

Here is the Invitation:

Bill Scebbi is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: The Coalition of State Horse Councils – Tuesday, June 15th, In Conjunction with 2021 AHC Conference.

Time: Jun 15, 2021 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6481411928

Meeting ID: 648 141 1928

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Meeting ID: 648 141 1928

Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kVvVASPRK

Here is the Agenda

COALITION OF STATE HORSE COUNCILS

June 15, 2021

1:00PM (Eastern Time)

Zoom Virtual Meeting

Topics Subject to Change

Call to Order – Chair, Bill Scebbi

Secretary’s Report – Minutes – Prepared by Sue Gray

Financial Report –Tom Tweeten, Financial Liaison

State Updates – Tom Tweeten – Brief update from each State Representative (3 min report)

Presentation: The Coalition Website, Bill Scebbi will lead the review of the Coalition of State Horse Councils new website, the various areas that will help with communication, calendars and other options for the state’s use.

Round Table Discussion:

  • Recruiting New State Members, Sue Gray from North Carolina Horse Council will lead a discussion on how best to provide value and services to state Horse Councils.
  • Horse Expos How to Best to Work Together, Ann Swinker has helped develop many equine educational events and will lead this discussion to see how state can work together on their major events.

Old Business

New Business

 Meeting Adjourned

For more information

Email: Bill@coloradohorsecouncil.com

VERY SHORT UPDATE – TODAY’S URGENT 911 – EMERGENCY CALL FOR STARVING OLD MAN AND ANOTHER BABY WITH A BROKEN LEG!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

ANOTHER 911! — They are truly never ending.

This beautiful old man is emaciated and needs our help today!!!

I am running on Faith, but I have to tell them yes. He does not deserve the alternative.

ANOTHER CALL for a privately owned baby (yearling) with an obviously broken leg. She is suffering horriblyI need to get her asap so she can be humanely euthanized.

RIP – Reba Emergency vet visit yesterday. Our beautiful Reba turned septic and her pneumonia was so bad she couldn’t breathe. This happened in 2 days and Doc said she had Failure of Passive Transfer. (Not enough colostrum from Mom and too late to do anything about it.) She had been under vet supervision and was on antibiotics, but without the immunities there is no chance.

RIP – Fidelity – Her swollen ankle was broken. The ONLY humane thing for her was to end her suffering. My babies aren’t even buried and we have new, living, suffering emergencies. So I can’t shut down, I have to keep going and cry later.

I am beyond devastated. This year has been horrible for these babies. All I can do is pray for strength and that folks step up and make it possible to save every one we can.

Thank you for being there for these precious souls.

We so appreciate ALL YOUR LOVE AND SUPPORT! There are more babies coming and it looks like the year is going to be brutal. I cannot do this without you. Please say a prayer and let’s keep saving lives! It’s up to you!

If you would like to help with our ongoing vet bills,

HARRAH VETERINARY 509 848-2943
GOLDENDALE VET CLINIC 509 773-0369

If you would like to order FOAL LAC & send milk, (Or baby wipes, vaseline, gloves, Foal Response, Foal Lac Pellets, syringes, Probios etc.)

Send to CHILLY PEPPER,

C/O MELODY LEBEAU

1630 Pumphouse Rd

Toppenish, WA 98948

509-985-8214
CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

TT 38

LTR Training Tip #38: Showmanship is Not Just for Show

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One of the most difficult things your equine will ever learn is to stand perfectly still while the show judge inspects him.

Download Detailed Description

See more Training Tips

HELICOPTER ROUNDUPS: Less than a month away (!!)

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

As I write this, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is rounding up wild burros in California. Next month, the official roundup season begins in full force. In the middle of July, Utah’s Onaqui herd will be targeted.

For these wild horses and burros, the dust never settles.

As you know, a huge part of our work involves observing and documenting as many roundups as we can. We do this to hold the agencies and government contractors accountable for their often inhumane actions. And, we report to the public what happens at each roundup on public land, so you’re informed.

Help fuel our programs. Please donate $30 today, and help us work to make roundups a thing of the past!

DONATE

But, we’re doing far more than just documenting. We’re fully engaged on the ground and working to ensure that cruel roundups are minimized — and ideally eliminated — in the future.

  • We’re working in Congress to ensure that protective language is being submitted that would give funds to in-the-wild management to begin the shift away from removals.
  • In Onaqui, we have submitted a scientific plan for the humane management of the beloved horses that would leave them wild.
  • We are working with a prestigious University on a rulemaking petition to make violations of the BLM’s animal welfare standards enforceable by law.
  • We are proving humane management can work to keep wild horses wild through the world’s largest fertility control program for mustangs in Nevada.

We need all hands on deck, Erica, because the Biden Administration just released the next fiscal year’s budget, and it includes a $36.8 million increase for the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program. The new proposal also continues the Trump Administration’s accelerated roundup plan that could remove nearly 90,000 wild horses and burros from their homes over just the next five years!

We’re pulling out all the stops. We’re using our legal, legislative, scientific and grassroots resources to do everything we can to halt this inhumane and antiquated population control tactic. Can you make a $30 donation today to help us have the resources necessary to continue our efforts?

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Thank you for your support,
Suzanne Roy

Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

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MULE CROSSING: Longears Loving Impact

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By Meredith Hodges

“Behold, thy King cometh unto thee:

   he is just and having salvation; lowly

     and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt

       the foal of an ass.”   –  Zechariah 9:9

3-donkeys

These words have been an inspiration to all who have heard them since the time they were written—to those of us who love Longears, the words carry the message of a lifetime and the secrets of a dream. Not only did the Lord Jesus ride into Jerusalem on the back of an ass, but remembrances of that ride are clearly marked on the backs of many asses since in the form of a cross. One can really only guess why asses received this unique blessing, but as the Lord blessed the asses, so they have in return endeavored to bless us with their righteous ways.

It would seem that the asses were chosen because they represent more fully the characteristics in all of us that are just and good. The most evident inspiring characteristic of the ass is his undying affection for humans and the patience he exhibits when dealing with them; an excellent portrayal of this affection and patience is found in Marguerite Henry’s story of “Brighty of the Grand Canyon.” In addition, asses are not possessive creatures. They do not seek to impress, nor do they have inflated ideas of importance. They are humble, not greedy or selfish and are content to give freely all that they have to give. There is no limit to their endurance and no end to their trust. Unpleasant moments are undoubtedly remembered, yet forgiven when requested and owners are inspired to be more constructive in their management and training methods. Within asses, there is a hidden hope of happiness, contentment, peace and brotherhood. The inspiration of these noble characteristics does not go unnoticed as they ennoble those around them.

Throughout our lifetimes, we are faced with challenges and choices, most of which are met by trial and error. Asses limit and simplify our choices, leaving us less room for trial and error and more chance for success. An example of this could be the man who could not make his donkey cross the bridge over a deep, wide canyon. Failing to cause the donkey to cross the bridge, the man spent much extra time walking his donkey down one side of the canyon and up the other. As they rested at the far side of the bridge, a horse and rider approached the same challenge. The horse balked, but the rider forced him onto the bridge. About the middle of the bridge, the boards were rotted and horse and rider plunged to their death – a costly lesson. “He who trusts in himself is a fool, but he who walks in wisdom is kept safe” (Proverbs). Stop, look, and listen with your heart as well as your ears. Your donkey has much to teach you.

croplj11-16-11-005Man has always sought to better himself and his environment. He seeks to set shining examples to all, however, he falls short due to negative aspects in his character. The ass, who has always been humbled, does not seek to set examples, he is an example with his honest and faithful ways. He is quick to accept that which is good and tolerant of all else. This unique character coupled with his physical abilities makes him an excellent life partner.

Perhaps, the most important and unselfish contribution the donkey has made in this world is his willingness to produce offspring not of his own species. We can only imagine the reasons for this. Perhaps, he saw a chance to combine his incredible character with the physical beauty of the horse, again to try to please us humans and make him more attractive to us. But whatever the reasons, mules and donkeys are attracting more humans with each passing year. They instill in us a desire to support and promote their cause, which in turn becomes our cause. What human can detest the cause of happiness, contentment, peace and brotherhood?

It is apparent, like never before, the impact that Longears are having on people all over the world. The shows and events including them have grown tremendously over the last 50 years, and the number of people affected by them has increased so much that we now see people in localized areas putting on their own events. In Colorado, for example, the only shows for Longears were incorporated into larger shows such as the Colorado State Fair and the National Western Stock Show. Today, counties are taking initiative to include mules and donkeys in the county fairs, and local riding clubs are inviting them to participate in annual All-Breed shows. Increased understanding and appreciation for the positive qualities of Longears brings more and more people together all the time. Their generous ways have positively influenced people toward a genuine pursuit of happiness. Why is this phenomenon occurring? Because, “We may not realize that everything we do affects not only our lives, but touches others too. A little bit of thoughtfulness shows someone you care and creates a ray of sunshine for both of you to share. Yes, every time you offer someone a helping hand, every time you show a friend you care and understand, every time you have a kind and gentle word to give, you help someone find beauty in this precious life we live. For happiness brings happiness, and loving ways bring love; and giving is the treasure that contentment is made of.” (Amanda Bradley).

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1985, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.

 

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