Monthly Archive for: ‘August, 2019’

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MULE CROSSING: The Language of Longears

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By Meredith Hodges

Many of you know me as the foremost authority on the contemporary saddle mule, but what you may not know is how I earned such a title. Most of us who have become trainers began by riding and showing. Through our success, we gained recognition and subsequently clients who brought their animals to us for training. Our success with their animals posed a question for each of us at a critical stage in our careers and we had to make a decision whether we were going on the road to do clinics or something different. I opted for something different!

Instead of going on the road to do clinics, I thought long and hard and decided to do an equestrian correspondence training course instead. I opted for this after considering that when I went to clinics as a student, I was one of 20 people and only got limited attention during those clinics. When I put into practice at home what I had learned at the clinics, I realized that I had only received the highlights of training and it was full of holes! When I tried to contact the clinicians to ask a question, I was either answered by someone in the office, or not answered at all. The clinicians were most often too busy and out of touch. The one thing I didn’t realize by making this decision was the incredible learning opportunity I had opened up for myself that I could, in turn, pass on to my clients.

I did my resistance-free video training series in as much detail as I could possibly muster. Each video represents a year’s worth of training, but as we all come to know, you can never know everything. The more you learn, the more you learn what you don’t know. I did learn fairly quickly that the relationship between equine and owner is unique to those individuals. That is, I realized it made more sense that I teach people how to train their own animals. After all, you wouldn’t ask someone to go out and make a friend for you? The relationship is truly your own and I adopted the policy that as a trainer, my responsibility would be to guide people through the process of training their own animals for the best possible results. This has proven to be true far beyond any expectations that I might have had!

This decision afforded me more time at home where I could communicate with others and help them with their animals. It also afforded me more training time with my 30 head of mules, horses and donkeys. I have always done the training of my own animals myself. I had an assistant for awhile who kept the old school masters and other broke mules exercised from time to time. However, the actual training of the mules I did solely by myself because I wanted to keep learning new things that would enhance my training program and make it better. The new things I learned I documented in the form of books, videos and television shows. What began as a quest to train and show mules in every equestrian discipline expanded beyond my wildest dreams!

When they told me mules would not work well in a snaffle bit, I learned how to make that work. When they said they were not suitable for Dressage, I based my entire training program on those principles. When they told me not to give food rewards, I paid my mules for their efforts with a generous reward of crimped oats. When they told me not to talk to my equines, I spoke three languages to them: verbal language, body language and “touch” language. I can truthfully say that today I realize that it wasn’t the mules that were so stubborn, but rather…it was me! This positive kind of stubbornness did pay off, as I was to soon discover.

Beginning with the “A B C’s” (walk, trot, canter, whoa, back), my verbal language with them evolved over time into actual conversations. The tone of my voice indicated my pleasure or displeasure with their actions. Calling their names and then stating a command prompted their immediate attention. When working with multiple animals, phrases like “Get back on the rail!” and “Stop kicking your brother!” initiated a positive response and validated my expectations that they could indeed understand what I was saying beyond the normal commands. I watched their reactions to the tour guests we had at the ranch as they walked through the barn and met these animals. If a guest made a remark, the animals responded with an appropriate show of emotion. If it was a snide remark, they would lower their heads and splay their ears in a most dejected way. A positive remark would elicit a show of attention with ears perked toward the person who made the comment. This has shown me that they do understand English, even if they cannot speak it!

Body language is probably the most important of all the “languages.” These animals will mirror you and react to what your body is telling them. If you position yourself in front, you can turn them or stop them. If you walk up to them in an aggressive way, they will show fear. If you go to a gate or the stall door and wait with an inviting attitude, they will come to you. Of course, learning accurate body language is a responsibility that we must put upon ourselves to really be effective. I just watched the reactions of my animals to everything I did and said. If I received a negative response, I would change my approach until I got it right. When I got it right, so did they!

“Touch” language is simply how you touch your animal whether it is with your hand, a grooming tool or a whip. Touch needs to be empathetic but firm enough to do the job. Touch is a powerful tool. It can be soothing and relieve anxiety. It can be pleasurable or painful. Touch can indicate direction depending on how it is used. We begin with imprinting, or touching of the foal all over its body, but this is not the beginning and end of imprinting. Imprinting sets the stage for the kind of interaction you and your equine will have during your entire life together and can often bridge a gap of misunderstanding when the other two languages are not working. Never was this more apparent to me than just recently!

Little Jack Horner had gone through my entire training series right along with my mules and had learned everything that I taught them. He may not have made it to Fourth Level Dressage, but he made it to Second Level Dressage with gait lengthening and lateral work. He overcame his “donkey” behaviors and gave a phenomenal performance, jumping four feet in exhibition at Bishop Mule Days. His Reining was accurate though somewhat limited by his donkey conformation. Still, he could always elicit a supportive laugh and a wide grin!  He competed successfully at dressage driving shows and won world championships in driving at Bishop Mule Days.

Little Jack Horner was to star yet again in the making of my biography, our latest Those Magnificent Mules documentary project. I doubt that I had driven Little Jack Horner in fifteen years. In fact, since he turned twenty, he had not done much but take part in more sedate roles in our TV shows and videos with an occasional bareback ride around the ranch. At 30 years old, I wasn’t really sure how he would react to being hitched to the Meadowbrook cart again after so many years, so I thought I had better do a dress rehearsal.

During the dress rehearsal, I discovered that Little Jack Horner didn’t know what to do once I put on the harness. He was tied in the tack barn and when I tried to ground drive him forward, he just backed up until he was out of the building, then he went forward to the hitching area. I was rather puzzled. Still, I went ahead and hitched him to the cart and we stood there for some photos before I backed him from the hitch rail. I verbally asked him to go forward…nothing. I did not have my driving whip with me, so I used the end of the reins on his fanny to move him forward which he then did, but kept going straight until he ran into the fence and stopped.

I thought this was very strange, so I asked my ranch manager to get my driving whip. With the whip in hand, I began to talk to him with the whip. A simple tap to the side and he turned from the fence. Another tap in the middle of his spine sent him smartly forward at an animated walk. Another tap to the other side turned him the other way and we were soon doing figure eights, stopping, backing and driving as if there was never a problem at all. During the film shoot, he did all these things and even offered several hundred feet of trot before he was too tired to continue.

It was during this experience that I realized that Little Jack Horner had become deaf and could not hear one word of what I was saying, even when I was yelling. I was sitting in the Meadowbrook cart, he had blinders on his harness bridle and could not see me, so verbal language and body language were of no help to him at all. Lucky for us, we still had the “touch” language that we had developed between us and we thoroughly enjoyed the experience of driving yet again.

It is evident to me that every detail that I had taken the time to learn in our 30-plus years together culminated in the results I see now with all of my equines. We have learned so much about each other! Now that we are all a lot older, a lot slower and a lot less coordinated, we are still afforded the luxury to continue to learn and grow together in a safe and enjoyable way. It doesn’t get any better than this!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2010, 2011, 2016 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All rights reserved.

45 WASN’T ENOUGH – 26 MORE BABIES COMING TODAY!! OUR TOTAL FOR THE LAST 2 WEEKS IS 71 – BABIES NEED MORE HELP NOW!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

WOW – ANOTHER 911 CALL – 26 MORE babies today. I should have stayed home lol. I am in WA State as we got called for 5 babies last week. Received another phone call this morning and now we have another 26 babies to save. THESE BABIES NEED FOLKS TO HELP ASAP!

Between NV and WA, we have now pulled in 71 babies and yearlings in the last 2 weeks. Talk about running on faith. The wonderful donations we received have pretty much been spent rescuing these kids, feeding them, and on some initial veterinary care. God has always provided us with such amazing Angels (YOU) who donate so we can keep saving these PRECIOUS LIVES.

However, this one is especially based on faith, as we need so much help to be able to save these kids. Again, everything is a deadline, and we need to be able to commit to and pick up these babies tonight.

PLEASE HELP US SAVE THESE ADDITIONAL 26 BABIES!

AS ALWAYS, THIS IS A 911, as we are the only chance these babies have to start their new lives. So once again, our CHILLY PEPPER FAMILY is on the FRONT LINES! Let’s do what we always do and “git ‘er done”!

THANK YOU from each and every baby!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Action required: Wild horses on brink of destruction

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Right now, the Senate is considering partial funding for a plan that, if approved, could mean the beginning of the end for free-roaming horses and burros. The plan, ill-conceived and full of dangerously vague language, is hidden within the Interior budget bill and it’s on track to be negotiated in September.

Take action now: Sign our petition to protect America’s wild horses and burros.

What is this plan? It’s a ten year attack on wild horse populations, and nothing short of a surrender of the decades-long fight for fair treatment, humane management, and preservation of our nation’s wild horse and burro herds.

The plan is billed as a compromise between the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, other livestock lobbying groups, and the Humane Society of the U.S. (HSUS), the ASPCA and Return to Freedom, but there’s nothing in it for wild horses.

In fact, it calls for the roundup of 130,000 wild horses and burros over the next decade – more than exist today on the range. This will triple the number of wild horses and burros incarcerated at taxpayer expense, at a cost of close to $1 billion over the next decade, without any guarantee of long-term funding to ensure safety from slaughter for these cherished animals.

And there’s more. Herd numbers will diminish beyond minimum viable populations, gruesome sterilization experiments for wild mares will remain on the table, and herds left on public lands will be manipulated with unnatural sex ratios that will wreak havoc on social organization and dynamics.

We’ve seen the power Americans have to affect change at a national level. We must band together to demand an absolute NO to this disastrous plan.

Take action now, and sign our petition to make sure your Senators vote against this dangerous proposal.

Thank you,

– AWHC Team

Donate

Tell Your Senators to Co-Sponsor the PAST Act!

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The following is from the American Horse Council:

American Horse Council Action Alert

Tell Your Senators to Make History! Push PAST Act Over the Finish Line!

Before breaking for the August recess, the U.S. House of Representatives adopted the Sen. Joseph Tydings Memorial Prevent All Soring Tactics (PAST) Act of 2019 (H.R. 693) by a vote of 333 to 96.  In the wake of this historic vote, the horse industry is focusing efforts on the Senate, where there is an opportunity to gain a “super-majority” of cosponsors for the senate version of the bill (S. 1007), championed by Sens. Mike Crapo (R-ID) and Mark Warner (D-VA).

Take Action

 

VSV – CDA Warns against Misinformation- 8-16-2019

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

August 16, 2019

Colorado Department of Agriculture warns against vesicular stomatitis misinformation

Stay informed!

 

For information all equine diseases

Equine Disease Communication Center

Great information on all equine health notices and needs.

Don’t leave home with your horse until you have

 check this site out!

 

Stay informed and help us protect your rights as Horse Owners
Join or Renew your Colorado Horse Council membership online today!

 

Did you know you can renew membership or become a new member online at the Equine City Hall?  Just  Click Here!

Save the postage and the time, and renew today!

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 16, 2019

Veterinarians and Livestock Owners Contact:  Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office, 303-869-9130

Media Contact:  Mary Peck, 303-869-9005, mary.peck@state.co.us

 

Broomfield, Colo. – As Colorado’s livestock communities continue to manage a significant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) outbreak affecting 20 counties across the state, misinformation about the virus is being shared on social media channels and traditional media outlets. The initial source of the inaccurate reporting, comparing VSV to a “rabies-like” virus, was an  Associated Press article that was reposted by a number of media outlets. The article has since been corrected.

“It is highly misleading to say that vesicular stomatitis virus is a rabies-like virus.  Both viruses belong to the same family, Rhabdoviridae, but that classification is based on viral structure alone,” said Maggie Baldwin, Epidemiology Traceability Veterinarian for the Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA).”The two diseases have no similarities in transmission, clinical signs, or outcome.”

VSV is a virus from the genus Vesiculovirus. VSV is a viral disease that causes blisters and ulcers on the mouth, feet, ears, and udder of cattle, horses, and swine, and occasionally mules, donkeys, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas. The rabies virus is from the genus Lyssavirus.  Rabies is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system of mammals and has an extremely high case fatality rate.

VSV is not considered a highly contagious virus, as it is spread primarily through insect vectors, and rarely through saliva or other contact. Please refer to the CDA VSV website for accurate information and resources.

CDA has confirmed cases of VSV in Adams, Alamosa, Arapahoe, Archuleta, Boulder, Broomfield, Conejos, Delta, Douglas, Gilpin, Grand, Jefferson, La Plata, Larimer, Mesa, Mineral, Montezuma, Montrose, Morgan, Ouray, Pueblo, and Weld counties.

ALL VSV cases are important for the epidemiology and management of this outbreak and MUST be reported to the State Veterinarian’s Office at 303-869-9130, regardless if the owner and veterinarian decide to have their livestock tested or choose to manage as positive premises based on the presence of typical clinical signs without testing.The only cases that may be managed as suspect positive are equine cases located in counties that have confirmed cases.

Equine owners and livestock producers across the state are impacted by VSV; all livestock owners should carefully watch the case numbers and affected counties to gauge their level of risk and institute mitigation measures.

The total count of premises under quarantine for VSV by county is outlined in the table below.  CDA’s Animal Health division is updating this table regularly with the latest data on its CDA VSV website.

FULL TABLE HERE

Please see the USDA APHIS Veterinary Services website to read the current situation report for all confirmed cases in the U.S.

The first case of VSV in Colorado was reported on July 3rd in Weld County by a field veterinarian from the State Veterinarian’s Office at the Colorado Department of Agriculture.  An incursion of VSV-infected insect vectors is the likely source of infection. There are no USDA approved vaccines for VSV.

Vesicular Stomatitis Background
Vesicular stomatitis is a viral disease that primarily affects horses and cattle but occasionally swine, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas will show clinical signs. The transmission process of VSV is not completely understood, but includes insect vectors such as black flies, sand flies, and biting midges.

The incubation period ranges from 2-8 days. Clinical signs include vesicles, erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, ears, teats, and coronary bands. Often excessive salivation is the first sign of disease, along with a reluctance to eat or drink. Lameness and weight loss may follow.

Humans may become infected when handling affected animals, but this is a rare event.  To avoid human exposure, individuals should use personal protective measures when handling affected animals.

Tips for Livestock Owners

  • Strict fly control is an important factor to inhibit the transmission of the disease.
  • Avoid transferring feeding equipment, cleaning tools or health care equipment from other herds.
  • Colorado veterinarians and livestock owners should contact the state of destination when moving livestock interstate to ensure that all import requirements are met. Contact information for all state veterinarian offices is listed here.
  • Colorado fairs, livestock exhibitions, and rodeos may institute new entry requirements based on the extent and severity of the current VS outbreak. Certificates of veterinary inspection (CVIs or health certificates) issued within 2-5 days prior to an event can be beneficial in reducing risks. Be sure to stay informed of any new livestock event requirements. See the Vesicular Stomatitis Guidelines for Shows and Fairs.

 

Important Points for Veterinarians and Horse Owners

Any vesicular disease of livestock is reportable to the State Veterinarian’s Office in Colorado – to report call 303-869-9130. If after hours, the voice message will indicate which staff veterinarian on call.

 

Additional resources

Take 2!! New Items Live in our 2nd Chance Auction!!!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

Thank you all for your continued support!

New horses and the story of an intake:  Sawyer and Jasper

Sawyer and Jasper recently came to AAE when their owner fell on very hard times.  They are super sweet, pony-sized kids coming three this Fall.

Sawyer

Sawyer’s was born November 2016, and her dad was a Spanish QH and mom QH/Shetland.  At intake, Sawyer weighed in at about 825 pounds and measured about 13.1 hh.  Sawyer is a fancy lil’ gal that came in with a bit of a spoiled/pushy ‘tude.
Sawyer is learning her manners, as hard as it may be because she really loves her human friends.  Sawyer is easy to bring in from pasture, and she’s lower gal on the totem pole in the herd.  She is enjoys grooming and lots of attention.  She has been trimmed once and is learning to stand patiently and give her hooves freely.  Sawyer is improving her ground skills, working in the round pen and will soon be learning to ground drive with a surcingle.
She’s taking it all in stride.  This little character will make a fun project for an experienced person.  Sawyer is available for adoption and will be ready to go to her new home after her dental appointment next week.  She is current with vaccines, deworming, and hoof care.  She has a microchip in place, and her DNA results are in ( 1st Galiceno, 2nd Quarter Horse, 3rd Belgian Draft).
If you are interested in adopting Sawyer, please visit her page for more info and submit an Adoption Inquiry.

Jasper

Jasper was born October 2016, and his dad was a Spanish QH and mom a registered Paint.  At intake, he weighed in at only 700 pounds and measured 14.0 hh.  Jasper is a laid back kinda guy that came in a little bit shy.  He was thin, and his hooves were long and flared.  He had not been gelded, so we made immediate plans to take resolve that “issue”.
Jasper was warming up quickly with only a minor setback when his personal space was invaded, and we learned he was hiding both of his gems.  Wait, it wasn’t Jasper that had the setback, it was AAE when we learned he was a bilateral cryptorchid.  Neither of his testicles had descended.  To be sure he actually had testicles and wasn’t magically gelded by some equine angel in the night, we confirmed with a blood test.  “He does have testicles”, just what we really didn’t want to hear.  Needless to say, Jasper made his way to Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center for brain surgery, I mean castration.  Thankfully, surgery went well, and Jasper recovered nicely.
Jasper has come around to enjoy humans with little concern.  He still needs to build a bit of confidence, but all in all, he’s a sweetheart of a guy.  He’s learning his manners, and he’s learning patience, relatively well.  Jasper, the lil stud colt that he was, had some inherently strong, manly beliefs.  He’s slowly losing his enthusiasm around other horses, and he’s learning to be more respectful in the presence of others.  He has not made a transition to pasture yet, because he still has some belief that he’s “the man”, a stud, and he really likes the girls.  When recently introduced to pasture, he thought he’d show Blue up a bit.  Oops, not how we thought that introduction would go.  For now, he’ll spend more time appreciating the herd and pasture from the other side of the fence.  In the meantime, Jasper is enjoying grooming and attention.  He has been trimmed twice and is still learning to stand patiently and give his hooves freely; however, there was big improvement with the second trim.
Now that Jasper has recovered from surgery, he has been improving his ground skills, working in the round pen, and he will soon be learning to ground drive with a surcingle and wear a saddle.  He has some growing to do.  He’s filling out nicely, but seems delayed a bit due to malnourishment early on.  Like Sawyer, he’s taken it all in stride.  Jasper will also make a fun project for an experienced person.  Jasper is available for adoption and will be ready to go to his new home after his dental appointment next week.  He is current with vaccines, deworming, and hoof care.  He has a microchip in place, and his DNA results are in ( 1st Quarter Horse, 2nd Turkoman, 3rd Holsteiner).

If you are interested in adopting Jasper, please visit his page for more info and submit an Adoption Inquiry.

The Story of an Intake:

While Sawyer’s intake was unusually straightforward, she’s waiting for her person to find her.  She’s getting an education and hoping the next inquiry is for her.  Might you be hers?
If you are interested in adopting Sawyer, please visit her page for more info and submit an Adoption Inquiry.
Jasper is a great example of the many needs and challenges encountered with each intake.
He is also available for adoption and waiting to find his person.   If you are interested in adopting Jasper, please visit his page for more info and submit an Adoption Inquiry.
Stay tuned for the rest of the story, The Story of an Intake.
In the meantime, thanks for following, and check out our auction below.
Though our Boots event is a big boost to our budget, the calls for help with horses never ends, and sadly, neither does the need for fundraising.
For those of you that were unable to attend Boots (and those that attended, too), we had some auction items that were not bid on, and we thought it would be fun to have a second chance auction, online….a second chance for items to be won, a second chance for you to win, and another chance for you to keep helping horses!  We’ve added some cool new items, too.
We have a series of auctions lined up, so visit often and share broadly!
Our first auction was a success with bids on all six items.  The second round is here!
All About Equine’s Second Chance Auction is live on our Facebook page.  Like our horses, these items are in need of a new home and a second chance!
We hope to will find something you can’t live without, so help the horses by bidding!  All the proceeds from the online auction go directly to care for horses and ongoing operations at AAE!
We are so grateful to all of our donors for providing AAE with these items to feature!  If you have an item you’d like to donate and be featured in one of our online auctions,
please contact dani@allaboutequine.org.
THANK YOU for your continued support!
 Our current 2nd Chance Online Auction is open!  
 
Bidding closes at 1pm PST on August 15, 2019
 
Featured Items
Two Night Weekend Stay for Two in a Standard Room with Regency Club Access for two guests at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco in San Francisco, CA. Valid Friday, Saturday or Sunday, based on availability. Certificate cannot be combined with any other packages. Certificate Expires 3/21/2020.
Value: $800 
Starting Bid:  $300
Thank you, Hyatt Regency San Francisco, for donating this wonderful getaway!
Swiss Blue Topaz and Kingman Arizona Turquoise Drop Earrings.
Value: $250
Starting Bid: $100
Thank you, Talisman Collection, for these beautiful earrings!
This signed print by local photographer Jack Nissan captures the High Sierra Nevada in digital infrared. This print was produced by a Pentax K1000D (IR) digital SLR that has been modified so that it is sensitive only to infrared radiation which is in invisible to the human eye, The resuting image is true “infrared”, in that they are produced onl by reflected infrared radiation. Print is framed and matted. Print comes with Certificate of Authenticity.
Value: $250
Starting Bid:  $100
Thank you, Jack N. for donating your beautiful photos!
We have a large selection of Jack’s photos at the All About Equine Used Tack Store!
In this lovely cloth tote is a vintage tea set by Overland Stoneware. The Tea pot consists of 3 pieces including an infuser for loose leaf tea. The set is complete with matching Creamer Cream Jug and Sugar Bowl. Also included is Variety Tea Sampler, Winter Solstice Black Tea, Chocolate Orange Rolled Wafers and Green Tea Scone mix. Everything you need for your own Tea Party!
Value: $65
Current Bid:  $30
Thank you, Lori R, for donating this beautiful set and goodies!
The Ozark Trail 7-Person Teepee Tent provides a comfortable shelter at the campground, in the wilderness or in other outdoor areas. A unique frame eliminates the center pole interference and provides flexible space for up to seven people while also allowing for easy installation. The Ozark Trail teepee tent has enough room to accommodate sleeping bags or cots. This 7-person tent also includes a bag for storage and carrying between camp sites. Floor dimensions: 11’8″ x 11’8″, Center height: 92″, Square footage: 105 sq ft. Also included is two (2) Ozark Trail Folding Camp Cots. The Ozark Trail Basic Comfort Folding Cot in brown polyester gets you off the ground and onto comfort with a weight capacity of 250 lbs. Made with a durable, corrosion-resistant steel frame and 600D polyester, this camping cot is designed for quick and easy setup so you’ll have a place to slumber in a flash. You can rest easy on a solid bed without the hassle. This model includes a carry bag, making moving and storing it simple and painless. These items are in like-new conditions. The zipper is broken on one of carry bag for a cot.
Value: $100
Current Bid:  $25
Thank you, Gaylon & Alayne B, for encouraging more outdoor adventures!
This Oak framed print of an native american woman at the rivers edge would make a great addition to you home. It measures 33×27 inches and is double matted.
Value: $100
Starting Bid:  $50
Thank you, Donna N. for this beautiful art work!
Daily Horse Care, especially pm shifts needed now
(Daily 8a-12p or 3p-6p)
Used Tack Store Support, all areas 
(Fri – Mon, 12-4p)
Barn/Facility Maintenance
Foster Homes, Long-Term Foster/Sanctuary Homes
Capital Campaign Support
Board Members
Fundraising/Events
Grants – Writing and Research
Volunteer, Project, and Activity Coordinators
Outreach Activities
Youth Programs
Therapy Programs
Veteran Programs
Special Projects
Admin Support
Marketing
Graphics
Social Media
Bloggers
Photographers
Media and/or Photo Librarian
More, more, more
Interested in volunteering or volunteering in other areas?

Employers Match Donations, Does Yours?

Hey volunteers!
Did you know YOU could earn grant money for AAE from your employer just by volunteering?
Many Employers offer money when their employees volunteer.  Here are a few examples:
  • Intel

    provides a $10 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $5,000 per employee or retiree.

  • Microsoft provides a $17 grant to a nonprofit per every hour volunteered by an employee.
  • Apple provides a $25 grant to a nonprofit per every volunteer hour by an employee, and matches funds dollar for dollar up to $10,000 per employee.
  • Verizon provides a $750 grant to a nonprofit when an employee volunteers for 50+ hours.
  • State Farm provides a $500 grant nonprofit when an employee volunteers for+ 40 hours.
  • Others top 20 matching gift and/or volunteer grant companies include
    • Starbucks 
    • CarMax
    • Home Depot 
    • JP Morgan
    • Chevron
    • Soros Fund Management 
    • BP (British Petroleum)
    • Gap Corporation
    • State Street Corporation 
    • ExxonMobil
    • Johnson & Johnson
    • Boeing
    • Disney
    • Google
    • Merck
    • Aetna
    • Dell
    • Outerwall (CoinStar and RedBox) 
    • ConocoPhillips
    • RealNetworks
    • Time Warner and subsidiaries
    • AllState
    • and more
Check with your employer.  You could help purchase our next load of hay!

Ranchers call for a roundup of wild horses on our public lands. Don’t let the cattle industry win

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Earlier this week, a federal court judge in California issued an order granting us the right to intervene in a lawsuit, filed by public lands ranchers, seeking the immediate round up and removal of 2,000 wild horses from the Devil’s Garden Wild Horse Territory in the Modoc National Forest.

At the same time, our attorney is in San Francisco today, participating in court-ordered negotiations with the U.S. Forest Service on a separate lawsuit, filed by AWHC and the Animal Legal Defense Fund, to stop the agency from selling Devil’s Garden horses for slaughter.

Please, support our ongoing legal efforts to protect the Devil’s Garden wild horses in California from special interests that seek their mass removal and slaughter.

The Devil’s Garden Territory is home to one of California’s largest remaining wild horse populations. Yet under pressure from local ranching interests, the Forest Service seeks to reduce the wild horse population to 200 – 402 horses, while allowing over 3,700 cows and 2,900 sheep to graze the public lands there.

The situation that has been unfolding in Devil’s Garden — from the roundups to the proposal to sell the mustangs without limitation on slaughter — represents one of the more serious attacks on wild horses by the public lands ranching industry.

Enough is enough. We’re waging two separate legal battles to defend Devil’s Garden mustangs from this existential threat.

Please help us fund this crucial fight today. Your donation will be earmarked for the legal efforts to protect the right of the Devil’s Garden wild horses to live wild and free on our public lands.

As always, we are the last line of defense for America’s wild horses and we must keep fighting until their safety is assured.

—AWHC Team

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THE ROUNDUP BEGINS – SIXTY PLUS BABIES EXPECTED???? WILL YOU SAVE THEM? A CHANCE TO GET THEM BEFORE THE KILL BUYER.

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

THEY JUST KEEP COMING! Got ANOTHER CALL!!!!l for UP TO SIXTY (60) – YES, 60 or more, ORPHAN BABIES. The roundup in NV has already started, sorting has begun and we are on call for this afternoon!!.

We have been given the chance to purchase these orphans BEFORE the kill buyer gets their hands on them. Praising the Lord for that one. Although no one likes the roundups, this makes saving the ones we can so much easier.

We are also on call for any other “special needs” kids that might come in!, whether it be injuries, starving etc. We will be there for the ones that need us!

This will save about $300 per baby just to rescue them. By being offered this “pre-purchase” opportunity, we will save about EIGHTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS ($18,000) IF we can raise enough funds and are able to rescue the 60 we were told about.

We are estimating to purchase the babies, get Coggins, health Certs etc. and to provide the milk and feed they will need to get buy for a couple months, we should plan on about $500 per baby. That will give us a couple? month’s worth of feed. Most of these babies are not weaned, and will need their milk replacer!

It is definitely going to take awhile to find homes for that many babies. There could be more! Everyone is always saying that rescues should get them before they get to the kill buyer. Well, here is our chance. I believe they only have to be about 400 pounds to ship, so we need to save as many as possible.

We are shooting for $30,000 so we can save up to 60 babies and actually be able to start providing care for them until we find them homes That is just the start, as there will most likely be at least a few who need vetting.

Once again I was given a deadline to commit, and as always, I went on pure Faith. Y’all have saved so many lives and I know that no one wants these babies to die.

It is time for EVERYONE to come together.

We still have babies at the Shipper’s in WA, and the 4 (3 stallions) in Idaho that I wrote about yesterday. We are hoping other rescues will take on even a few of the babies. We need to work together!

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, Help us get this done. We have had miracle after miracle because YOU GUYS SAVED THE DAY! Let’ keep it going and save these lives.

(Babies pictured here are some of the groups you have saved in the past.)

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

911 FOR 2 STALLIONS, 1 GELDING & A YEARLING!! WILL YOU HELP SAVE THEM? 48 HOUR DEADLINE – PLUS ONE VERY HAPPY SINBAD!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

 

Another 911, Received an emergency call for the horses shown above, a couple hours ago. We have until Friday to save them. There are two stallions and a yearling who all need to be gelded. Stallions have so much less of a chance to find homes, but we can “git ‘er done”, with Your help!(Sometimes it is a bummer being the ones who can “do stallions”, but these lives matter!)

All four need saved, and we need your help to have their Coggins drawn, get their Health Certs etc. and be able to transport them to safety.

As usual, we need immediate help to save these beautiful souls. The good news is that we can save them, and the great news is that 3 of them already have a safe place to land, once we rescue and vet them. The gelding needs some serious hoof care, and then we can work on placing him also.

But the timing is critical and it is urgent as there is no leniency on the deadline.

THANK YOU for saving Sinbad. (aka Hero) (Shown above left)

Great news!! He is on his new Mama. They are with our friends Bev Boshart and her group, and Mama and Baby are loving each other. Mama needs some serious groceries as well, and both are getting everything they need and the best care possible. We so appreciate Bev taking on this little one. This is the 2nd Mama and baby this year, that they have matched up with a little magic from the vet.

Another reason to celebrate. Remember poor Obsidian? Well, here he is today. He now has his permanent home, and he is thriving there. He still has serious emotional issues, but is improving every day. He is comfortable where he is living and starting to interact a bit more on his own. Physically he is thriving. Every day this beautiful boy is healing and enjoying his life, and it is all “THANKS TO YOU”!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

https://www.gofundme.com/f/save-orphan-foals-amp-horses-from-slaughter?

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

There’s no recess for wild horses… and more news

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

Photo by Kimerlee Curyl

No Recess for Wild Horses – Take Action!

Where does your member of Congress stand on protecting wild horses? If you don’t know, now’s the time to find out. And if they’re supporting mass roundups and sterilization, it’s the time to change their minds. Your Representative and Senators are back home for the August recess and will be holding town halls and taking meetings – so now’s your chance to speak up for our wild horses and burros! Learn how at the link below. 

 

Response to Alta Magazine’s, “Feral Horses, Fierce Controversy”

Our wild horses and burros are often the subjects of inaccurate, misleading, agenda-driven reporting. A recent example is Jason G. Goldman’s “Feral Horse, Fierce Controversy” that was published in the July issue of Alta, a magazine that promises “a celebration and examination of all things about California.”  If you shopped at Whole Foods in California this summer, you will have likely seen this cover story on the magazine prominently displayed in the check-out lines.  It’s a biased, sensationalized piece far below the journalistic standards that Alta says it aspires to. Read our response below.

 

U.S. Forest Service Seeks to Weaken Environmental Review Regs. and Limit Public Comment

The U.S. Forest Service is proposing rules that will significantly weaken its regulations under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) which requires federal agencies to assess the environmental effects of proposed actions prior to making decisions. The Forest Service proposed rules would limit the opportunity for public input and make it easier for the agency to make decisions on proposed actions, like wild horse roundups, without analyzing the environmental impacts. Please read more and weigh in against the proposed rule change by clicking below.

 

Video Highlight of the Week: Issue Overview

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VSV – All Cases of VS are Important – 8-2-2019

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The following is from the Colorado Horse Council:

August 2, 2019

Colorado State

Veterinarian’s Office

ALL VSV cases are important

Stay informed!
Stay informed and help us protect your rights as Horse Owners
Join or Renew your Colorado Horse Council membership online today!
Did you know you can renew membership or become a new member online at the Equine City Hall?  Just  Click Here!
Save the postage and the time, and renew today!

Vesicular stomatitis cases are now confirmed in 14 Colorado counties

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 2, 2019
Veterinarians and Livestock Owners Contact:  Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office, 303-869-9130
Media Contact:  Mary Peck, 303-869-9005,mary.peck@state.co.us

Broomfield, Colo. – The Colorado Department of Agriculture has confirmed cases of vesicular stomatitis (VSV) in the Colorado counties of Adams, Archuleta, Boulder, Broomfield, Conejos, Delta, Jefferson, La Plata, Larimer, Mesa, Montezuma, Montrose, Morgan, and Weld.

ALL VSV cases are important for the epidemiology and management of this outbreak and MUST be reported to the State Veterinarian’s Office at 303-869-9130, regardless if the owner and veterinarian decide to have their livestock tested or choose to manage as positive premises based on the presence of typical clinical signs without testing.The only cases that may be managed as suspect positive are equine cases located in counties that have confirmed cases.

While an individual equine case may not seem vitally important, the case numbers and case management as a whole (diagnostics, movement restrictions, issuance of hold orders and quarantines) are critical.

“It is of utmost importance that livestock owners report VSV occurrences and comply with hold or quarantine orders to limit the potential for disease spread in this VSV outbreak.” said Colorado State Veterinarian Dr. Keith Roehr.

Equine owners and livestock producers across the state are impacted by VSV; all livestock owners should carefully watch the case numbers and affected counties to gauge their level of risk and institute mitigation measures.

The total count of premises under quarantine for VSV by county is outlined in the table below.  CDA’s Animal Health division is updating this table regularly with the latest data on its CDA VSV website.

Please see the USDA APHIS Veterinary Services website to read the current situation report for all confirmed cases in the U.S.

The first case of VSV in Colorado was reported on July 3rd in Weld County by a field veterinarian from the State Veterinarian’s Office at the Colorado Department of Agriculture.  An incursion of VSV-infected insect vectors is the likely source of infection. There are no USDA approved vaccines for VSV.
Vesicular Stomatitis Background
Vesicular stomatitis is a viral disease that primarily affects horses and cattle but occasionally swine, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas will show clinical signs. The transmission process of VSV is not completely understood, but includes insect vectors such as black flies, sand flies, and biting midges.

The incubation period ranges from 2-8 days. Clinical signs include vesicles, erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, ears, teats, and coronary bands. Often excessive salivation is the first sign of disease, along with a reluctance to eat or drink. Lameness and weight loss may follow.

Humans may become infected when handling affected animals, but this is a rare event.  To avoid human exposure, individuals should use personal protective measures when handling affected animals.
Tips for Livestock Owners

  • Strict fly control is an important factor to inhibit the transmission of the disease.
  • Avoid transferring feeding equipment, cleaning tools or health care equipment from other herds.
  • Colorado veterinarians and livestock owners should contact the state of destination when moving livestock interstate to ensure that all import requirements are met. Contact information for all state veterinarian offices is listed here.
  • Colorado fairs, livestock exhibitions, and rodeos may institute new entry requirements based on the extent and severity of the current VS outbreak. Certificates of veterinary inspection (CVIs or health certificates) issued within 2-5 days prior to an event can be beneficial in reducing risks. Be sure to stay informed of any new livestock event requirements. See the Vesicular Stomatitis Guidelines for Shows and Fairs.

Important Points for Veterinarians and Horse Owners

Any vesicular disease of livestock is reportable to the State Veterinarian’s Office in Colorado – to report call 303-869-9130. If after hours, the voice message will indicate which staff veterinarian on call.

 

Additional resources

HELP SAVE SINBAD! MAMA DIED AND BABY NEEDS IMMEDIATE AND URGENT CARE! PLEASE HELP NOW!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Another emergency for an emaciated foal. I received another 911 call today. One of the babies at the shipper’s is in dire shape. His Mama passed away, and he needs our help now!!!

Please help us Save Sinbad. He needs urgent and lifesaving care immediately.He will be at Mama Mel’s Urgent Care Nursery for now. I have a call in to one of our folks in WA who has had success in the past, hooking up Mama’s and orphan foals, and we have high hopes that he may be one of the lucky ones. This will be done under veterinary care, and he will have 24/7 care.

But for now we need to save him and we need to stock up on all of our supplies for the rest of the babies who are still at the Shipper’s. We know there are already more coming, and as usual, we need your help now! We are short on all our baby supplies and we still have 8 babies at this time,

Thank you!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

https://www.gofundme.com/f/save-orphan-foals-amp-horses-from-slaughter?

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Thank you

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Today marks the end of our Summer Roundup Campaign. Thanks to your support, we were able to exceed our fundraising goal – we’ll have what it takes to document fall and winter roundups and keep fighting to protect wild horses across the West.

Over the last few days, our field representative at the Pine Nut roundup has witnessed helicopters stampeding small numbers of horses for hours at a time to no avail. By the end of the roundup, which concluded yesterday, only 36 horses were captured in total. One beautiful black mare broke her leg and was killed as a result.

The few remaining Pine Nut wild horse families have evaded the trap, despite 90+ degree temperatures and days of relentless chasing. We’re sickened at this cruelty. We’re angry that these actions are taken at taxpayers’ expense.

Because of your generosity during this campaign, we have the funding to continue the fight. And, in the spirit of the Pine Nut mustangs still living free, that’s just what we’ll do.

We started this fundraising campaign to fuel our government relations team in educating Congress about the BLM’s inhumane practices, to support our litigation fund for roundup-related lawsuits, and to broaden our education and advocacy programs documenting how taxpayer dollars are being used and wasted.

As summer roundups continue into fall and winter, we’ll be there to hold the BLM accountable and raise our voices to keep wild horses and burros protected from undue harm and danger.

It’s not too late to chip in and help us protect the wild horses that we hold dear.

Thank you for being part of our herd as we continue to make sure wild horses stay wild.

—AWHC Team

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Speak up for Utah’s wild horses and more news

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

 

Take Action for Utah’s Wild Horses in the Range Creek HMA

The BLM is seeking public comments on a roundup and removal plan for the wild horses that live in the Range Creek HMA in Utah. The HMA includes 55,000 acres of public and private lands, on which the BLM has set a wild horse population limit (AML) of just 75-125 wild horses. The agency seeks to remove over 200 horses and reduce the population to the low AML of 75, a density of one horse per 733 acres! The BLM’s plan also includes the implementation of fertility control, including the use of unproven IUD’s, and the skewing of wild horse sex ratios to favor of males. Please weigh in today against yet another roundup and urge the BLM instead to implement proven humane and sustainable wild horse management tools.

 

BLM Reorganization Will Have Major Impact on Public Lands and Wild Horses 

A massive reorganization of the BLM that involves moving its headquarters to Grand Junction, CO and transferring most of its Washington, D.C. staff out west — combined with the Administration’s installment of a lawyer who advocates for the sell-off of federal lands in the top agency post — is raising concerns about the future of our public lands and the agency tasked with managing and conserving them. The developments forbode further dysfunction within the BLM, increased control by local and corporate interests over federal public lands policy, and a growing threat to the environment and wild horses and burros. Read more below.

 

New Census Shows Devil’s Garden Mustang Population Half the Size Claimed by Ranchers

On Tuesday, the U.S. Forest Service announced its plan to conduct another roundup of California wild horses from the Devil’s Garden Wild Horse Territory in the Modoc National Forest. At the same time, the agency released new census numbers showing far fewer mustangs actually live in the Forest than previously claimed by the ranching interests that have waged a propaganda campaign against the horses. The ultimate goal is the removal of most of these cherished California mustangs from the public lands that comprise the Modoc Forest. Read more below. 

 

Video Highlight of the Week: The Rescue of the ‘Oklahoma 6’

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