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First 100 Day Wild Horse Agenda

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

A new year, a new administration, and wild-horse friendly leadership at the Interior Department and on the House Natural Resources Committee. This is our moment to make real change for wild horses and burros this year — the 50th Anniversary of the Wild Free Roaming Horses and Burros Act. 

We have an ambitious action plan to make 2021 the best for wild horses yet… and we have the team in place to accomplish it! Watch this video message to hear the plan we delivered to the new administration, and then sign our First 100 Days Agenda Petition

Our 100 Day Wild Horse Agenda Includes: 

  • Urging the government to declare our nation’s wild horses and burros as historic and cultural resources, prioritize humane fertility control over roundups and prohibit cruel mare surgical sterilization as a management tool.
  • Continuing to demonstrate through boots-on-the ground work that humane management of wild horses is not just possible; it can be done. We’ll do this by working to expand our groundbreaking PZP program in the Virginia Range to other herds in the West.
  • Putting science at the forefront of wild horse management — we will be launching exciting new initiatives that analyze our PZP program data and create an economic report to highlight the missteps of the current mismanagement path and the cost-savings of an alternative approach.
  • Continuing to amplify our work and your voice on Capitol Hill while pursuing legislation to finally give our wild horses and burros the protection they deserve.

This is an ambitious agenda, but this is our year to fight hard for the change we want to see in the world. It will take every one of us stepping up however we’re able — whether it’s lending your voice, time, or money.

This is our time to prioritize, protect and elevate America’s iconic wild horses and burros and the public lands they call home. I’m so excited to see what we accomplish together in 2021. Thank you for standing with us – we can’t do this work without you!

Suzanne Roy

Executive Director

AWHC

We delivered a 100 Day agenda for wild horses and burros

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

It’s been a wild first two weeks of 2021, but we’re standing strong at AWHC for our wild horses and burros. We’re a few days away from a new Administration and our team has been pushing forward with our plan of action to protect America’s wild free-roaming horses and burros from mass roundups and slaughter.   

First 100 Days Wild Horse Agenda for the Biden Administration

Just this week, AWHC submitted its First 100 Days Wild Horse Agenda to the Biden Administration with an urgent plea to reform the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) wild horse and burro management program, which is careening toward fiscal and animal welfare disaster.  

Urgent action is necessary in light of the BLM’s plan to round up 90,000 wild horses and burros from public lands over the next five years, a move that would triple the number of horses maintained in off-range holding facilities while decimating wild herds at a cost to taxpayers of nearly $1 billion. 

This agenda can set the stage for progress and reform of BLM’s inhumane practices.

We’re hopeful that the new administration will take significant steps to rein in the BLM and its mistreatment of our nation’s wild horses and burros. By following our First 100 Days Agenda, the Biden Administration can take necessary first steps to finally granting these iconic animals the protection and humane management they deserve. 

Public Lands Rancher Appointed to Represent Public on Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board

The last four years have been marked by an all-out assault on our public lands by the Interior Department under Secretary David Bernhardt and the illegally-serving BLM Director William Perry Pendley. America’s wild horses and burros have not escaped the destruction. Scapegoated for massive environmental damage to public lands caused by the livestock industry, these iconic animals face virtual extinction under the Bernhardt/Pendley Plan to cull wild herds by 70 percent. 

And now, in a parting shot, the outgoing Secretary has appointed a public lands rancher who views wild horses as a “protein source” to represent the public interest on the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. Read more about this corrupt appointment and AWHC’s vow to fight it here.

AWHC Responds to One-Sided Sacramento Bee Article

Last month, the Sacramento Bee published a one-sided story on the Devil’s Garden wild horse herd, which gave a megaphone to ranchers who want the land where the horses roam for their cattle. The article dismissed wild horse advocates as having a romanticized view of wild horses, who the author believes are better off captured and fed in pens than living free in the wild. On Saturday, the newspaper published AWHC’s response in an OpEd entitled, “How to fix federal mismanagement of California’s wild horse population.” Read the article here.

AWHC continues to fight the mismanagement of the Devil’s Garden wild horses by the U.S. Forest Service, which recently announced that it was selling all wild horses captured in a fall 2020 roundup for $25 a piece. Previous sales of captured Devil’s Garden wild horses have resulted in many disasters, including the escape of two untamed mustangs who are still at large in Pennsylvania, the deaths of 9 horses from salmonella poisoning after being shipped to Florida, and 18 horses delivered to a remote Colorado property that can be inaccessible during the winter months.

Meanwhile, the Forest Service continues to charge ahead with roundups as its main management tool and declined AWHC’s previous offer to fund a pilot fertility control program for this herd, which is California’s largest and most significant wild horse population. 

Roundup Report from Eagle Complex

Another massive wild horse roundup is underway, this one in the BLM’s Eagle Complex in eastern Nevada. AWHC’s observer is on site to document this capture operation that aims to remove over 1,000 wild horses and reduce the population to just 139-265 in this 743,000-acre habitat area — that equates to as little as one horse per every 5,345 acres!  The BLM is clearing the land of wild horses so that thousands of cattle and sheep can continue to graze this public lands area. 

As with any roundup, the scenes we’re witnessing are truly heartbreaking. As of Jan. 15, 412 wild horses have lost their freedom in the Eagle Complex roundup and five have lost their lives.   

Below Are Photos Our Observer Took During Eagle Complex Roundup:

Watch a clip from BLM’s first roundup of 2021:

We are working hard to change this — in Congress, in the courts and in the field by showing that humane management works. We need YOU more than ever to keep showing up, speaking up, and supporting our work. Together, we will do everything in our power to protect America’s wild horses.

Thank you for your support, Meredith. Our wild horses — and their continued freedom — depends on all of us.

— The whole team at AWHC

1st 911 for the NEW YEAR! STARVING OLD LADY – MYSTIC IS 27, EMACIATED, STARVING AND WILL NOT SURVIVE WITHOUT IMMEDIATE HELP!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

URGENT HELP NEEDED TO SAVE THIS MARE!

She is obviously emaciated, has no top teeth, and has to be absolutely freezing in these cold winter temps.

I receive the 911 last night to save her. We are her only hope.

PLEASE HELP ME SAVE MYSTIC! She will need blanket(s), and lots of special groceries. She will also need the normal vetting, hauling etc.

She can come live with Grandma in the “Mash Pen” IF WE CAN SAVE HER!
She will need LONG TERM care, and definitely some blood work and vetting.

It breaks my heart to think of how miserable she is standing out in the cold with nothing to provide heat. No feed, – she HAS TO HAVE MASH, and no blanket or shelter.

PLEASE HELP NOW!

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

USED, ABUSED, STARVED AND THROWN AWAY! – TREASURE UPDATE!! IT’S GO TIME TO STOCK UP ON BABY SUPPLIES!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Thanks to your love and support, we were able to save Treasure AND get Smurf and Noel safely home.

Sadly, Treasure is in even worse shape than we were told. The first thing I did was take him to Doc to get his bloodwork run. He is severely anemic, and he probably had no more than a few days left to live, without being dewormed. Doc said he had so many bloodworms they were literally killing him.

His white blood cell count is horrendous as well. So much that Doc is afraid he has leukemia. I de-wormed him, and then we went into having scours immediately. For more than 5 days he had the most horrible diarrhea (scours), and it was, and still is hour to hour with him. We are now praying he does not have any blockages from all of the worms.

He is in critical shape at best, but is the most loving and kind horse I have ever met. We spent hours just sitting in the yard, while he stood with his head in my lap. He is literally breaking my heart, and I am doing everything I can with special feed and meds etc. He could really use another blanket or 2, as he tends to need his washed every day or so. His size is about a 78″. It is bitterly cold here and he has nothing to keep him warm, so it is imperative that he stays blanketed while it is cold.

It’s time to stock up on Foal Lac Powder, Foal Lac Pellets, Vaseline, Gloves, Baby Wipes, Paper Towels, Bute, Banamine, Shavings, Mare & Foal Pellets, syringes, needles, Colostrum (IGG) for the new born babies, Foal Response, French Clay, bandages, thermometers, scissors, baby halters, baby blankets, and the list goes on. If anyone would like to help us get ready for foal season, you can order off of Valley Vet or Fosters and Smith or Chewey.com. I still have to get the 2 stallions gelded and the goat’s leg amputated, and we need to be ready for the babies BEFORE they get here.

Little Annie Oakley says she would love some more Foal Lac Pellets. She is starting to feel much better and her wormy belly is finally gone.

Thank you so much for all the lives you saved in 2020 and before. It seems to be the norm that there is simply no “down time” anymore, and baby season is almost here. (Or here already – if you ask Annie, lol).

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

Annie Oakley, home in Golconda!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

An update

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Great news: our end of year fundraising totals are in, and thanks to your incredible support, we were able to reach our $125,000 goal and UNLOCK our donor match!  Your support will make an enormous difference for wild horses and burros as we launch our ambitious 2021 agenda.

We have a lot of work ahead of us, but we know we can always count on you to lobby your elected officials, support our critical legal work, and raise awareness across the country about the plight of America’s magnificent wild horses and burros. This is a tough fight, but this movement has stood up to the challenge over and over again and we’ll do it again in 2021. Please read on for a recap of the 2020 accomplishments that we’ll build on and a preview of what your generosity will allow us to do this year! 

Strengthened Political Support & Made History

We teamed up with our coalition partners and worked with members of Congress to introduce the first pro-wild horse legislation in over a decade. Passed by the House of Representatives, the bipartisan wild horse protection amendment would require the BLM to implement PZP fertility control to manage wild herds humanely on public lands. Although the final spending bill did not include the House-passed amendment, it did include strong fertility control language as well as other pro-horse provisions — a sign that Congress is well aware of our growing grassroots strength and increasing support on Capitol Hill for our cause. We have an incredible opportunity this year to make real change with the nomination of Debra Haaland as Secretary of the Interior and the continued leadership of Rep. Raul Grijalva as Chair of the Natural Resources Committee. Both are wild horse and burro champions who are committed to protecting these beloved animals and reforming the broken federal wild horse and burro management program.

Filed Suit to Protect Wild Mares

The day after the roundup ended in Utah’s Confusion Herd Management Area, our legal team filed suit to stop the BLM from conducting barbaric sterilization surgeries on many of the just-captured wild mares. This is our third legal action against the BLM for plans to conduct the risky and invasive “ovariectomy via colpotomy” procedure, and we’ve successfully held the agency off since 2016! Joining us as a plaintiff in the latest lawsuit is Utahn Rob Hammer, who has extensive knowledge of the Confusion wild horses and the public land area where they live. In 2021, we’ll continue to drive this case in the courts while we also work with Congress and the administration to eliminate this brutal surgery as an option for the management of our wild horses and burros, once and for all.

Created Accountability for BLM Roundup Abuse 

While the COVID-19 pandemic made traveling much more difficult in 2020, we continued to address roundup abuse by sending humane observers to nearly every one of the many helicopter roundups conducted by the BLM and the Forest Service last year. This year we took a step beyond documenting roundups by launching an initiative to create a mechanism for enforcing the BLM’s Comprehensive Animal Welfare Program standards, which the agency routinely violates. We’ve teamed up with the Animal Law & Policy Program at Harvard University Law School to develop a rulemaking petition to strengthen the BLM’s animal welfare guidelines and turn them into legally-enforceable regulations. The petition will be ready for submission to the new Administration this year. If it is not acted upon, we will have the option of litigating, so please stay tuned!

Proved Humane Management is Possible

Our in-the-wild management program reached new heights in 2020. Not only were we able to grant funds to boots-on-the-ground organizations in Arizona and Colorado to support their fertility control programs, we also achieved an unprecedented milestone in our own fertility control program in Nevada’s Virginia Range. Last month, our volunteers and staff surpassed 3,000 treatments administered to mares in less than two years, making this the largest free-roaming horse fertility control program in the world, according to the Science and Conservation Center! Just last week, the Deseret News — Utah’s second-largest newspaper — published a feature highlighting the success of our program. In 2021, we will continue to support local groups managing their herds, expand our fertility control program in the greater Reno area, and we’re working to expand our fertility control efforts to new herds in the West!

Launched Habitat Acquisition Project

We officially launched the pilot project for the American Wild Horse Conservancy, our new land trust, in 2020. The inaugural effort focuses on securing habitat for the famed Fish Springs Wild Horses who live on BLM and private land in the Gardnerville, Nevada area. The Conservancy overall will focus on critical land acquisition to secure key habitat for wild horses, grazing lease buyouts and compensation for reduced or non-use of grazing permits, and range improvements to improve the quality and quantity of habitat available for wild horses. We can’t wait to expand this innovative program in the coming year!

We have a lot of work to do, but together, we’ll make real progress for our cherished wild horses and burros in 2021. So stay ready, stay safe, and stay tuned!

With Gratitude,

Suzanne Roy, Executive Director

Strong, Resilient & Fierce

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We’re still shy of our EOY matching goal… just hours left to make your tax-deductible gift and double your impact.

As I watch the clock wind down on this tumultuous and difficult year, I’m reflecting on the gratitude I feel for our amazing community of supporters, and the generous spirit and compassion of each one of you. 

The American Wild Horse symbolizes strength and resilience, the qualities our country needs right now. We enter the New Year united in our love for wild horses and burros and committed to our fight to save them.

We have an ambitious agenda for 2021, and that’s why meeting our end-of-year matching goal so important. We only have hours left.

Just today, 20 more wild horses were rounded up by helicopter from their home on our public lands in Nevada. The thought of them alone – separated from their families, trapped and terrified breaks my heart and makes me even more resolute in our work to stop this cruelty from happening.

The 90,000 wild horses and burros who remain free are counting on me, they’re counting on you, and they’re counting on us as a community to keep fighting for them.

So, let’s go into 2021 strong, resilient and fierce – like wild horses and burros – to make real change for these animals we cherish.

We have only a few hours left to meet our goal. We can do this!

On behalf of our whole team, we wish you and your families a peaceful and healthy New Year.

Gratefully,

Suzanne

Day 31: Good-Bye 2020!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

Thank you for joining us this month as we shared stories from the barn that showed how your support helped horses this year. As we say good-bye to 2020 and ring in 2021, we are reflecting on our blessings from this year and what we would like to accomplish in the new year. We have a few resolutions for 2021! Top of the list is to find forever homes for all of our adoptable horses that didn’t find a person of their own in 2020. We don’t want them to wait any longer! Each of them deserves to have a loving family. Learn more about all of our adoptable horses below. Who knows – maybe you’ll be one of our featured stories next December! Another goal for the new year is to find generous supporters for each of the horses. If you (or someone you know) isn’t looking for a new live-in friend for 2021 but still want to support one of our horses, consider becoming a sponsor. Learn more about our sponsorship program. With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity, support, and kindness. It is because of YOU that we were able to help 31 horses in need and placed 23 in their forever homes. Sadly, we lost 9 precious lives. Overall, that makes 318 intakes and 254 adoptions since we started in 2009. We end the year with 48 horses at AAE. We couldn’t do this work without the help of our horse-loving community. Thank you!

AVAILABLE FOR ADOPTION

Learn more about each horse by clicking on its name.

If you are interested in exploring adoption,

please submit an Adoption Inquiry via the website.

Martina

Blue

Diesel

Carly

Shooter

Chesney

Mabel

Tegan

Big

Rustic

Raye

Marlee

Clare

Sandy

Teea

Frankie

Allie

Mags

Merle

Curly

For more information, click on the name to visit the horse’s or donkey’s webpage, and submit an Adoption Inquiry if you’d like to explore adoption.

Donate

This holiday season please consider making a year end donation to assure AAE has funding to continue the work we do and have similar stories to share in 2021.

Donate

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes

allow us to make this work possible!

Day 30: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

As we count down to 2021, join us every day this month as we share stories from the barn that show how your support has helped horses in 2020.

With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity and support.

In Honor Of

RUSTY, RUBY, and HOPE

As we approach the last post of 2020, we can’t leave the year behind without a special memory of three more horses. Not only was this year difficult with all of the impacts of COVID, but if you’ve been with us all year, you probably know it was a year of difficult losses. From 2009 through 2019, we’d lost 12 horses, many severe colics, some illness, a pasture accident, and a few with quality of life issues. (We do not euthanize to make space). This year was exceptionally difficult with loss of 9 lives (5 horses, 1 mini horse, 1 donkey, 1 mini donkey, and 1 goat). We’ve include stories of six so far. Three that remain were too special to not honor their memory one more time. I’ve relived them all the last 30 days, and they’ve weighed heavy, especially with the loss of Hardy just a few days ago. So, making it a little lighter on me….I’m keeping it brief. It doesn’t mean we won’t miss these three that touched so many people while here: Rusty, Ruby, and Hope.

RUSTY

Rusty was a 1986 Arabian that came to AAE in August of 2010 when his owner was facing deployment. Rusty was like a fixture at AAE until he passed April 16, 2020. Sadly, we were in the middle of COVID stay at home orders, and due to COVID fears, our care team had reduced to a skeleton crew. You can read Rusty’s story from earlier this year here.

RUBY

Ruby was a 1987-ish grade mare that came to AAE with her weeks old colt (Gem) in May of 2011. Yes, Ruby had a foal at about 24! Ruby left us on Christmas Eve 2013 to be a companion to an older horse, then came back in 2014 when he passed. She was a very sweet mare and was Rusty’s pal in the end. You can read Ruby’s story from earlier this year here.

HOPE

Hope was a 1998 grade Andalusian/Lusitano mare that came to AAE in February 2020 just prior to the COVID-19 stay at home order. She had been suffering from a horrific eye tumor for about two years. She was an incredibly brave mare that seemed so appreciative for the help. Hope was only here a short while, but she touched so many people with her kindness and gratitude. You can read Hope’s story from earlier this year here. Rusty, Ruby, and Hope left huge hoofprints on our hearts for a multitude of reasons. They were much loved and will never be forgotten.

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes allow us to make this work possible!

Give the gift that keeps on giving by sponsoring a horse on behalf of a horse-loving friend or family member!

As a sponsor, your annual or monthly contribution helps support the costs of care for a specific horse.

You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. You will receive an electronic “gift letter” with a photo of an AAE horse, acknowledging your gift on behalf of your recipient.

Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Patriotic Mustang T-Shirts

Horse fans will love this shirt!

The Patriotic US Flag/Mustang image on front and Mustang is My Favorite Breed (or Rescue is My Favorite Breed) in white on back. Available in Black, Ash Gray, Navy, and Brown.

Orders may be picked up at the AAE Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs or

shipped for an additional cost.

Order Now!

 

Stop by the AAE Used Tack Store to find the perfect gift for the horse lover in your life! Don’t know what they need? We have gift cards, too!

 

Here are more ways you can help!

Doing any winter cleaning? Donate your gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g. clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales help pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Donate Tack!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse?

Check out our current horses

If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete AAE’s

Adoption Inquiry Form

Adopt a Horse!

 

It truly takes a village. We’re grateful for our “herd.”

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Here at AWHC, we’re feeling the holiday spirit and that’s because of you.

Our incredible AWHC community is the greatest gift of all this season, and with it we have accomplished some of the most historic and unprecedented achievements in wild horse advocacy ever. Together, with our growing community of more than 700,000 wild horses defenders, we are showing that nothing is impossible when we speak as one.

We’ve talked a lot about our progress on the range, in Congress and in the courts, but today we want to share the stories of some of the precious lives we’ve helped to save by working together this year.

Our community is made up of everyday people coming together from all walks of life united to protect wild horses and burros. Time and again, you’ve shown up to help wild horses and burros. You’re always there when they need a helping hand.

We have a lot of work ahead of us — both to hit our fundraising targets before our EOY deadline this year, and to prepare for the challenges of the year ahead. However, we wanted to take a moment right now to celebrate our “herd” — YOU are the reason for the success of our work.

For the lives you’ve helped us save this year, thank you. There’s nothing we can’t achieve when we come together.

American Wild Horse Campaign

Day 28: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

As we count down to 2021, join us every day this month as we share stories from the barn that show how your support has helped horses in 2020.

With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity and support.

BLUE UPDATE

Remember this guy? Blue came to AAE from Nevada in March of 2017 after a request for assistance from the Virginia Range Wild Horse Sanctuary and Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund. Blue had been carrying around a large mass of proud flesh (granulation tissue) over his left rear fetlock/pastern area for some time. Although he had been haltered and handled some previously, he was not halterable when he arrived at AAE. We knew we had a big job ahead in helping Blue.

Before we could evaluate the mass, he had to be gentled and easily halterable, and his legs/hooves had to be readily handlable for frequent bandage changes after surgery. With a straightforward mustang, not a big deal, but Blue had some substantial fear/trust issues. Initial efforts with befriending and haltering him were lukewarm. Thanks to Dr. Stolba and Team LBEMC (throughout Blue’s journey), he had made enough progress that we were able to sedate him, radiograph the bony area beneath the mass, and collect tissue samples for biopsy. We wanted to make sure there was not an underlying reason for the mass before getting too deep into corrective measures if they would be for naught. It was not an easy feat. Even with heavy sedation, he kicked quickly and with purpose.

Radiographs and biopsy detected no obvious issues, so the work continued. Weeks in, Blue seemed to have had a reaction to something and developed a mysterious condition that turned out to be a form of vasculitis. He developed sores/ulcers throughout his entire mouth. The first layer of tissue pulled off with any type of pressure. They were horribly painful. Though his history and symptoms didn’t suggest, we had to quarantine him and test him for vesicular stomatitis. Thankfully, it was negative. We scaled back our efforts to reduce his stress and allow him to heal.  But, the mass was growing and oozing, and flies and yellow jackets swarmed the oozy mass.

After several weeks, he improved, and we resumed course. He would take a few steps forward, then a couple steps back. Finally, after many weeks with nominal results, we had a marathon day. We worked until we broke through. Six hours, he accepted handling and touching all over, and we practiced bandaging and removing bandage, over and over. The next day, our learning curve was much shorter, and the next and the next, until finally, we could halter, touch all over, and pick up his left hind and handle it all over. We practiced with big, bulky bandaging materials again, wrapped it up, and he was a gem!

We scheduled surgery, and in late August 2017, he lost nearly seven pounds in a matter of minutes. The mass had a narrow base and truly looked like a big brain. It weighed in at nearly seven pounds. Imagine what that must have felt like with every move. Needless to say, it was done!

However, the mouth lesions returned. There were more, and they were worse this time. They were on his body, around his anus, and on his sheath. Poor guy, these things were awful, and they appeared to be an autoimmune issue. At one point, we questioned his prognosis and quality of life, but before jumping to conclusions, we biopsied the tissue. We ended up with the vasculitis diagnosis. The best thing was, we changed up his meds, and the sores began to heal. The area where the mass was removed was beginning to heal.  In the meantime, the next test came when it was time to change his first bandage. With a bit of sedation, it went fairly smooth, but cleaning the lesion was a little challenging. But, wow, it looked amazing! Such a tremendous improvement. It was like a victory in and of itself, even though not healed.

Healing progressed nicely. After several bandage changes, Blue was getting resentful of the needle for sedation, so we tried without. It went well with cleaning a few times, until he didn’t like it when placing the medicated bandage over the lesion. It seems he was healing, and he could feel the area again. He stomped the bandage off, over and over. The stomp was a little intimidating, but really, he was only trying to get the “big white bug” off his leg. He didn’t kick out or kick at. His stomp was purposeful in knocking the bandage off his leg. Unfortunately, we couldn’t keep the bandage on, so we had to go back to sedation for a bit. Eventually, we could remove the bandage, clean the lesion, and replace the bandage without issue, without sedation, thankfully. Healing continued.

By November 2017, the lesion was almost healed, but there was a small area where the tissue was changing, so it was trimmed by vet. By January 2018, the lesion had nearly healed again.  Blue made tremendous progress.  However, as the months went on, the small area persisted and started to grow again.  We lasered the area and biopsied for a third time, and this time the biopsy revealed a sarcoid. They are persistent little buggers!!!

​We tried some different medication over the months, but nothing resulted in complete healing, and by Fall, we decided to laser again; however, by November 2018, the sarcoid was growing, it was removed, and another course of treatment began with new medications. Blue stood quietly for bandage changes every two to three days.

As of mid-February 2019, Blue’s lesion appears to have healed, we continued applying an anti-viral cream daily for several weeks, maybe months. So far, so good. The lesion is scarred (about a silver dollar-sized area with no hair growth), and his fetlock remains enlarged from lymphatic scarring. He’s sound, just a bit awkward looking above his hoof.

Blue’s healthy, happy, and in much better shape than when he arrived. He continues to have challenges with trust, mostly when introducing new things, but he continues to show progress, one baby step at a time. He loves his carrots, and he will respectfully do almost anything for a bite of carrot.  He also enjoys being “Uncle Blue” to the youngsters, a job he does well!

​Like we have said before, Blue’s story is not an uncommon story in terms of the hurdles we cross with any intake with special needs. We have unexpected bumps in the road that required more than anticipated. For Blue, it was the bouts of vasculitis and later, the discovery of the sarcoid. For some, it’s colic; for others, abscesses, lacerations from tree branches or scuffles with others. We can’t plan for these things, but need the resources to handle them when confronted. We are grateful to have had the support of our AAE community to assure we can manage most any unexpected issue along the way.

Blue is available for adoption only to the perfect, forever home. He needs a person that is mustang-experienced, extremely patient, and has no expectations other than companionship and providing a safe, caring home. Keep in mind, he lived on the open range for years, and he does not enjoy confinement. At AAE, he lives in a herd environment on about 10 acres. He comes in every morning and every evening at feeding time. He is somewhat social, but still skeptical of humans. Given the choice, he’d prefer a free-roaming life with occasional visit to two-leggers. Blue gives his feet for cleaning, and he is ok with the farrier when trimmed in a small paddock. Blue has learned very basic groundwork. He is always looking for Plan B, an escape. He can be touched and handled all over, but continues to have a difficult time relaxing and enjoying. He’s pretty good with his hooves, but the front right is still an effort. His leg is checked regularly for any recurrence of his sarcoid. Fortunately, we are still sarcoid free, and his scar is about the size of a quarter. Blue needs much more confidence before considering saddle training, and he will likely be a very long term project. Continuity and consistency will be key in building his confidence and advancing his skills. Blue is current with hoof and dental care, vaccines, and deworming. He has a microchip.

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes allow us to make this work possible!

Give the gift that keeps on giving by sponsoring a horse on behalf of a horse-loving friend or family member!

As a sponsor, your annual or monthly contribution helps support the costs of care for a specific horse.

You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. You will receive an electronic “gift letter” with a photo of an AAE horse, acknowledging your gift on behalf of your recipient.

Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Patriotic Mustang T-Shirts

Horse fans will love this shirt!

The Patriotic US Flag/Mustang image on front and Mustang is My Favorite Breed (or Rescue is My Favorite Breed) in white on back. Available in Black, Ash Gray, Navy, and Brown.

Orders may be picked up at the AAE Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs or

shipped for an additional cost.

Order Now!

 

Stop by the AAE Used Tack Store to find the perfect gift for the horse lover in your life! Don’t know what they need? We have gift cards, too!

 

Here are more ways you can help!

Doing any winter cleaning? Donate your gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g. clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales help pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Donate Tack!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse?

Check out our current horses

If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete AAE’s

Adoption Inquiry Form

Adopt a Horse!

 

 

 

Let’s end this year on a high note!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

We have a truly game changing opportunity before us in these last few days of the year, but we’re going to need your help to make it happen:

The Opportunity: A generous donor has just pledged to match every single donation made up to $125,000 before the end of the year. This represents the largest matching gift in AWHC history — and we can put it toward sprinting right into next year’s important work, if we can meet this one condition before midnight on the 31st.

The Condition: Together, we need to raise $125,000 in grassroots donations to unlock this generous matching gift. Our wild horses are counting on us.

We have a chance to exceed 2019’s end-of-year fundraising total and gallop past our $75,000 Giving Tuesday goal, but in order for that to happen, we need everyone to pitch in and work together to take full advantage of this amazing generosity.

Opportunities like this don’t come often. Can we count on you to donate toward our biggest-ever EOY fundraising drive TODAY so we can start 2021 in the strongest position to make a difference for wild horses?

 

If you have saved your payment information with FastAction, your contribution will go through immediately on clicking a link.

Together, we’ve made tremendous progress this year. We made history with the first wild horse protection legislation introduced in Congress in more than a decade. We obtained the support of over five dozen members of Congress in the fight against brutal surgeries for wild mares. We have broken all records with our groundbreaking fertility control program for mustangs in Nevada, which is setting a worldwide standard. And perhaps most importantly, the momentum you created with HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of phone calls, emails, and letter-writing has grown our scrappy horse-loving grassroots movement into the powerhouse it is today.

We also have significant challenges to overcome in 2021: with 90,000 wild horses and burros in the crosshairs for removal within the next 5 years if we don’t keep up this work. We need to pull out all the stops, Meredith.

That’s why unlocking the full $125,000 in matching funds for our End of Year goal is so important. We can’t hit this goal without you — Donate any amount TODAY for your donation to be matched and help us unlock the full gift to continue our fight in 2021.

Let’s end the year with our best fundraising effort EVER!

Thank you for your support,

American Wild Horse Campaign

Day 27: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

As we count down to 2021, join us every day this month as we share stories from the barn that show how your support has helped horses in 2020.

With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity and support.

CHESNEY, CLARE, and CURLY

Meet the three C’s, ChesneyClare, and Curly, recent intakes that came to AAE the end of November 2020, like others before them, from a distressed mustang sanctuary situation due to a family health crisis and financial distress. After 20 years of serving mustangs, the sanctuary was unable to adequately meet the needs of their horses.Upon arrival, these three were quarantined together, and they have had their hooves trimmed, dental floats, vaccines, deworming, and they got microchips. Two still have hind hooves to trim because they were naughty and need a bit more work!

CHESNEY

Chesney is a 14-ish mustang mare that was on the thin side needing hoof and dental care. She was very timid, but with lots of try. At pickup, she haltered with a slow, patient approach, and she loaded relatively easy.

Chesney lacks confidence, but she tries hard to understand. She allows her front hooves to be handled without sedation, but she needed sedation for her trim (fronts only). She wasn’t so confident with her hinds, so we’ll be working on that.

CLARE

Clare is a 15-ish Mustang mare. She is sweet (most of the time) and was relatively easy to halter. She loaded without issue, until trying to shift her inside trailer. She’s naughty around her hind end and will kick.

Clare was thin and in need of hoof and dental care. She also has a chronic fungal issue on her hinds. She is sweet and social, but can be evasive when haltering. She comes around with patience and persistence.

CURLY

Curly is about a 14-year old Curly Mustang. She is halterable, friendly, and easy going. She was easy to approach and loaded without issue.

Curly needed hoof and dental care. She was trimmed without issue (and no sedation necessary). She’s cute, personable, and seems uncomplicated.

We’re spending some time getting to know these three girls, but they should be available for adoption soon. Thus far, none have any obvious limitations, but we’ve only just begun to explore. We’re focusing on basic handling with Chesney and Clare, with priority on their hind hooves. Curly seems to have a great start, and we’ll likely introduce a saddle soon.

If you’re interested in adoption, please submit an Adoption Inquiry from our website, www.allaboutequine.org/adopt-a-horse.

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes allow us to make this work possible!

Give the gift that keeps on giving by sponsoring a horse on behalf of a horse-loving friend or family member!

As a sponsor, your annual or monthly contribution helps support the costs of care for a specific horse.

You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. You will receive an electronic “gift letter” with a photo of an AAE horse, acknowledging your gift on behalf of your recipient.

Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Patriotic Mustang T-Shirts

Horse fans will love this shirt!

The Patriotic US Flag/Mustang image on front and Mustang is My Favorite Breed (or Rescue is My Favorite Breed) in white on back. Available in Black, Ash Gray, Navy, and Brown.

Orders may be picked up at the AAE Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs or

shipped for an additional cost.

Order Now!

 

Stop by the AAE Used Tack Store to find the perfect gift for the horse lover in your life! Don’t know what they need? We have gift cards, too!

 

Here are more ways you can help!

Doing any winter cleaning? Donate your gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g. clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales help pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Donate Tack!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse?

Check out our current horses

If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete AAE’s

Adoption Inquiry Form

Adopt a Horse!

 

Day 25: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

As we count down to 2021, join us every day this month as we share stories from the barn that show how your support has helped horses in 2020.

With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity and support.

A Favorite Christmas Story

RASCAL & MADDIE

Maddie and Rascal have been buds for a while. They are two very special girls that both had very rough entries into this world, but they are doing very well. This year, the best gift ever, they went to their new home together! Rascal’s story is a long one, poor lil’ thing went through so much, but her will to live was ferocious.

Rascal faced a lot of challenges from her first day on Earth! Many of you may have heard her story, but reminiscing about Rascal never gets old. AAE got a call for help with on April 5, 2017. Rascal was just hours old; she became an orphan when her mom scaled a six foot paddock and left her behind. She was located over five hours away, so we mobilized and met in Reno to pick her up. Her lil’ body was very weak, and she couldn’t get up on her own.

First stop from Reno was Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center. Surprisingly, her initial outlook wasn’t horrible. She was diagnosed with selenium deficiency…

She was hospitalized. The initial outlook was fairly good, but after getting blood results, it was bad. Then, we got call at midnight and her blood values were moving in the wrong direction. We were preparing for not so good news in the morning. HOWEVER, Rascal had different plans. By morning, she was fighting back, she was drinking milk replacer on her own. As it turns out, she was fighting a severe selenium deficiency that caused white muscle disease, which also put her kidneys in distress. Her blood levels started trending in the right direction. There was no doubt she wanted to live! She was a FIGHTER, and she battled to live.  Docs thought she was likely she’s dealing with the results of being rejected by mom, stresses of transport, and secondary effects resulting from mom’s malnourishment and selenium deficiency. but they were hopeful that with 5 +/- days of hospitalization and supportive care, she had a good shot at a relatively normal life. A BIG THANK YOU to LBEMC for their quick actions and the outstanding care provided for this little filly.

The days passed, and her progress was steady but slow. After 13 days in the hospital, she still couldn’t stand up on her own. We brought her home to continue treatment. That basically meant 24/7 care, but fear not, AAE volunteers rose to the occasion. This little gal had someone with her at all times. Rascal was playful and sassy, can’t you tell? We had so much fun with her, and she was a super sport!

Even this special volunteer kept a watchful eye. Like Holli, volunteers slept beside her at night, not the least bit phased by the enormous rats that ran across the rails of the barn and the roof. Rascal had to be lifted to her feet every two hours. Once standing, she was fine. She would romp around the inside of the barn at night, and she run around the outside of the barn by day.

After 13 days at LBEMC and another 13 days at AAE, Rascal was able to STAND up on her own.

As if selenium deficiency, white muscle disease, and distressed kidneys weren’t enough, Rascal had several more hurdles along the way including an umbilicus infection, two bouts with c. diff bacteria (diarrhea doesn’t begin to describe it), large umbilical hernia (some would say she was a he) followed by surgical repair, an enormous hoof abscess, then chronic diarrhea for nearly a year.  Once the diarrhea resolved, so did all of her health issues. Today, she is healthy and thriving (and she passes normal poop). For Rascal, that’s reason to celebrate.

Beautiful girl about a year old.

Growing up

Love this girl.

She had a lot of interest and a few adoptions fell through for one reason or another

Then this happened! We couldn’t have asked for a better opportunity for Rascal and Maddie.

This video never gets old

Rascal video

Maddie

You met Maddie with her mom, Tae, earlier this month.

Maddie was only a few days old when she arrived at AAE. This beautiful little gal was being rejected by her mom. Mom was young, and this was probably her first foal, but sheesh, she needs to eat (drink). It was truly hard to watch.

Mom would bite her every time she tried to nurse, and she had little sores all over her tiny body. Sadly, as we were observing, mom was escalating, and it seemed to be getting more serious.

Smart little Maddie knew how to think outside of the box; she was creative. She learned she could come in the back side to find a teat. Unfortunately, she didn’t nurse like that all the time. After a while, mom picked her up with her teeth, and she tossed her. Heartbreaking to see! At that point, it didn’t look like these two would work out, so we separated them. An hour, maybe two passed.

Without baby beside her, Mom began to worry. We tried re-uniting them once more, and thankfully, everything changed. From that point on, these two were a great pair.

Soon it was time to stand on her own, but really, Maddie has always been her own girl. She’s smart, witty, sassy, and strong (minded). This is going to be one dynamo partner, but you’ll need to assure her you’re the better leader.

Before long, it was time for school, but this lil gal is still young, so she learned the basics, then she waited. And, while she waited, you know what happened next! So grateful! Happily ever after!

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes allow us to make this work possible!

Give the gift that keeps on giving by sponsoring a horse on behalf of a horse-loving friend or family member!

As a sponsor, your annual or monthly contribution helps support the costs of care for a specific horse.

You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. You will receive an electronic “gift letter” with a photo of an AAE horse, acknowledging your gift on behalf of your recipient.

Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Patriotic Mustang T-Shirts

Horse fans will love this shirt!

The Patriotic US Flag/Mustang image on front and Mustang is My Favorite Breed (or Rescue is My Favorite Breed) in white on back. Available in Black, Ash Gray, Navy, and Brown.

Orders may be picked up at the AAE Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs or

shipped for an additional cost.

Order Now!

 

Stop by the AAE Used Tack Store to find the perfect gift for the horse lover in your life! Don’t know what they need? We have gift cards, too!

 

Here are more ways you can help!

Doing any winter cleaning? Donate your gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g. clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales help pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Donate Tack!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse?

Check out our current horses

If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete AAE’s

Adoption Inquiry Form

Adopt a Horse!

 

 

Day 23: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

As we count down to 2021, join us every day this month as we share stories from the barn that show how your support has helped horses in 2020.

With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity and support.

RED

Red originally came to AAE back in July 2015. He had been at the Monty Roberts International Learning Center (MRILC) for several months. His owner passed while he was at MRILC for gentling. He had been rescued, but we none of the information about him or his rescue situation was available.

Though Red spent quite a bit of time at MRILC, he had a difficult time accepting human interaction. While at MRILC, he experienced a lot. He was socialized, learned basic groundwork and long-lining, and he was introduced to a saddle (no rider). All that considered, when he arrived at AAE, it was like starting over. It took tremendous time overcoming fear and accepting humans. All of his vet care was updated when he was ready.

Red was adopted by a youth adopter in Fall of 2016. and his progress continued, but due to the life circumstances and the realities of work and finances that come with adulthood, his young adopter was unable to continue to meet Red’s needs. Red continued building trust and learning about saddle work, even carrying a rider a few times.

Red returned to AAE the beginning of January 2018. His vet care was updated again, including dental and hoof care, vaccines, and deworming. Though disappointing, we were glad Red was back at AAE. He was always a volunteer favorite, and he was enjoyed by all of the horses,too.

Such a handsome guy! Not long after returning to AAE, Red suffered a freak pasture injury. Veterinary exam indicated he ruptured his peroneus tertius muscle.  This usually happens when the hock is hyperextended, likely in a quick turn or change of direction. Thankfully, it was a soft tissue injury, and not the ghastly fracture it appeared to be.  Red was on stall rest for more than a year, but he healed well.

Red is a super kind and willing guy, but still has considerable difficulty accepting human interaction and trusting that no harm will come to him. First contact with him is like 50 first dates…or 593,625 first dates by now. He snorts when approached. He snorts whenever he encounters something new….even if he’s seen it a million times. Once he’s been touched by human (or monster), he is relatively easy to halter, and he seems to enjoy grooming and hanging with humans. With his injury, after a few months, he was haltered and hand-walked almost daily, but you would never know. He still acts like it’s something new.

Red is sweet, smart, and honest, however he is reactive and perpetually snorty. He is always respectful of his handler’s space. Red was looking for a home where he would be loved for him and not what he could do, a home where Red would be a companion first, potential riding horse or not. Thankfully, Red finally found his person a short while ago!!

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes allow us to make this work possible!

Give the gift that keeps on giving by sponsoring a horse on behalf of a horse-loving friend or family member!

As a sponsor, your annual or monthly contribution helps support the costs of care for a specific horse.

You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. You will receive an electronic “gift letter” with a photo of an AAE horse, acknowledging your gift on behalf of your recipient.

Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Patriotic Mustang T-Shirts

Horse fans will love this shirt!

The Patriotic US Flag/Mustang image on front and Mustang is My Favorite Breed (or Rescue is My Favorite Breed) in white on back. Available in Black, Ash Gray, Navy, and Brown.

Orders may be picked up at the AAE Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs or

shipped for an additional cost.

Order Now!

 

Stop by the AAE Used Tack Store to find the perfect gift for the horse lover in your life! Don’t know what they need? We have gift cards, too!

 

Here are more ways you can help!

Doing any winter cleaning? Donate your gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g. clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales help pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Donate Tack!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse?

Check out our current horses

If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete AAE’s

Adoption Inquiry Form

Adopt a Horse!

 

Day 22: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

As we count down to 2021, join us every day this month as we share stories from the barn that show how your support has helped horses in 2020.

With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity and support.

Hello from Hearty Hardy!

HARDY

Hardy came to AAE in July 2019. He retired from the Folsom Police Department in 2017. Hardy was originally going to retire at AAE, but plans for him changed. We were thrilled to finally welcome him about two years later.

We recently searched the Standdardbred registry and learned he was born March 9, 1997 in Marlborough, CT. His name was HeartofHearts. Very suiting for such a loving guy! We were told he was a pacer on the harness track until he was 11 or 12, before he was retired to another rescue where he was loved by volunteers. He was subsequently adopted to the Folsom PD where he served as a police mount until 2017.

We recently searched the Standdardbred registry and learned he was born March 9, 1997 in Marlborough, CT. His name was HeartofHearts. Very suiting for such a loving guy! We were told he was a pacer on the harness track until he was 11 or 12, before he was retired to another rescue where he was loved by volunteers. He was subsequently adopted to the Folsom PD where he served as a police mount until 2017.

He was on the thin side and arthritic on arrival, so our first priority for this big love was getting him back on track with his joint injections to make him more comfortable. At retirement, he was getting bilateral hock and joint injections, but those had not been continued for an unknown period. He was also started back on daily Equioxx tabs to help, too. Then we updated his vaccines and hoof and dental care updated, he was dewormed, and he had a microchip “installed”.

Hardy is a beloved volunteer favorite, and the feeling is mutual. When he’s not getting the love of our volunteers, these days, we find this big hearted guy wandering the barn and keeping a watch over our operations and all of the horses.

He’s also known as our “taster”. As if we were a winery, he takes a little nip of everything he sees (except his own food)! And then, he acts like “What??? Me?? I didn’t do it”!

Hardy is truly one of the heart horses of AAE. He is a deeply soulful old guy that gives something to everyone without even knowing it.

He keeps a watchful eye over all of his equine friends, small and large, and we are grateful to be able to keep a watchful eye over him.

Hardy wishes everyone a happy and hearty holiday season. Happy holidays to you, Hardy, from all your AAE family!

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes allow us to make this work possible!

Give the gift that keeps on giving by sponsoring a horse on behalf of a horse-loving friend or family member!

As a sponsor, your annual or monthly contribution helps support the costs of care for a specific horse.

You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. You will receive an electronic “gift letter” with a photo of an AAE horse, acknowledging your gift on behalf of your recipient.

Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Patriotic Mustang T-Shirts

Horse fans will love this shirt!

The Patriotic US Flag/Mustang image on front and Mustang is My Favorite Breed (or Rescue is My Favorite Breed) in white on back. Available in Black, Ash Gray, Navy, and Brown.

Orders may be picked up at the AAE Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs or

shipped for an additional cost.

Order Now!

 

Stop by the AAE Used Tack Store to find the perfect gift for the horse lover in your life! Don’t know what they need? We have gift cards, too!

 

Here are more ways you can help!

Doing any winter cleaning? Donate your gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g. clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales help pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Donate Tack!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse?

Check out our current horses

If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete AAE’s

Adoption Inquiry Form

Adopt a Horse!

 

 

911 FOR 2 PREGNANT MARES – NOW WE HAVE “THE CHRISTMAS CREW, PLUS TWO (AND 2 UNBORN FOALS) – WILL YOU SAVE THEM?

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!

The phone calls won’t stop. TWO MORE LIVES AT STAKE – AND THEY ARE PREGNANT MARES! I was asked if I will do a “slaughter intercept” and save their lives.

The clock is ticking, and I need to commit.

So now we have the CHRISTMAS CREW – PLUS 2- plus 2

2 Mares and their 2 unborn babies.

The first four Weanlings are safe, but we still need to get them vetted, transported etc.

Thank you for saving their lives! Let’s make this an even bigger Christmas Miracle and save ALL OF THEM!

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

The original “Christmas Crew” below. I am sorry for the poor quality of the photos, but this was what we could get, considering we just pulled them.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Day 20: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

As we count down to 2021, join us every day this month as we share stories from the barn that show how your support has helped horses in 2020.

With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity and support.

MARLEE

Marlee came to AAE from a small sanctuary in October 2020 during a family distress situation. She was a bit thin, and she had a large summer sore in her right eye. Marlee was a bit timid and anxious. Apparently, she was a kill pen rescue that didn’t work out with her original rescuer.

Her summer sore was treated right away. It’s healed nicely and hasn’t had any residual issues. Her spa days came later. Her hooves were trimmed. Then she got her dental, vaccines, and microchip.

Marlee is a very sweet and pretty mare, and she enjoys grooming and attention. However, she lacks confidence and tends to worry, though since she’s been in a herd environment, her confidence has grown and her worry lessened. When alone, she paces and is constantly on the move. That said, since arrival at AAE, her confidence is slowly growing, and she’s becoming more social.

​Marlee has abnormal stifles, and she is not sound for riding. She is nervous with farrier and hoof handling, in general. The separation issue doesn’t help, but it seems it may be uncomfortable due to her stifle condition, as well.

Marlee is available for adoption and looking for love! She is current with hoof and dental care, vaccines, and deworming. She also has a microchip. She is best suited for a non-riding, companion home.

Marlee has bounced around a lot the last few years. She needs one last soft-landing to call her forever home. Can you be her last stop to call home???

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes allow us to make this work possible!

Give the gift that keeps on giving by sponsoring a horse on behalf of a horse-loving friend or family member!

As a sponsor, your annual or monthly contribution helps support the costs of care for a specific horse.

You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. You will receive an electronic “gift letter” with a photo of an AAE horse, acknowledging your gift on behalf of your recipient.

Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Patriotic Mustang T-Shirts

Horse fans will love this shirt!

The Patriotic US Flag/Mustang image on front and Mustang is My Favorite Breed (or Rescue is My Favorite Breed) in white on back. Available in Black, Ash Gray, Navy, and Brown.

Orders may be picked up at the AAE Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs or

shipped for an additional cost.

Order Now!

 

Stop by the AAE Used Tack Store to find the perfect gift for the horse lover in your life! Don’t know what they need? We have gift cards, too!

 

Here are more ways you can help!

Doing any winter cleaning? Donate your gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g. clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales help pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Donate Tack!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse?

Check out our current horses

If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete AAE’s

Adoption Inquiry Form

Adopt a Horse!

 

Day 16: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!

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The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

As we count down to 2021, join us every day this month as we share stories from the barn that show how your support has helped horses in 2020.

With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity and support.

The sweet Miss Mabel!

MABEL

Mabel, a mid-teen donk came to AAE in August 2019 with her two year old (intact) jack, Max, when their caretaker was unable to meet their needs. We shared some of Mabel’s story last year, and we have more updates. Before coming to AAE, Mabel endured enormous, deep sores on her legs, and irritating bites across her body. Their owner moved out of state and left Mabel and Max behind with her elderly mom who was unable to provide Mabel the care she needed to support severe fly sensitivity/allergy. Rather than see Mabel suffer through another summer, she was going to euthanize Mabel. As fate would have it, Mabel had a special friend that advocated for her and asked AAE if we could help.

Who could resist those faces? Mabel is the sweetest donk on earth; well, most of the time. She didn’t used to be. When she was initially seen for veterinary treatment in 2018, she was basically unhandled. In time, she understood her doc was helping her. Through that long healing process, she learned humans were ok. That made it much more practical to change her bandages and treat her legs. Mabel enjoyed her little donk pals, too. They looked up to her.

If you want an idea of what this poor girl went through, you can see Graphic photos of Mabel’s legs during healing at AAE, and photos from 2018 before coming to AAE.

If you noticed the swelling on her right cheek, Mabel also had a supernumerary (extra) tooth that was extracted when her dental was done shortly after arrival.

There was one more thing Mabel came with, but we didn’t learn about him until February 29, 2020. Mabel and Max had lived in separate paddocks a their previous home, but sadly, we were surprised to learn they spent at least a little time together before coming to AAE. Turns out, Mabel was pregnant and aborted an approximately 9 month old lil’ jack. We named him Maddox. Half of her placenta passed sometime in the early morning. When we found Mabel in the morning, she was calm and quiet, stoic as ever, seemingly unphased. It was an extremely difficult situation (baby was breach, and the cord was around his neck and between his two front legs). The vet came to AAE but was unable to remove Maddox’s lifeless lil body, so Mabel was transported to Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center. The docs struggled to remove the lil’ guy, and it wasn’t until their last ditch effort of suspending her hind end, were they finally successful. Though sedated, this was one stoic girl, and we are so happy she survived the ordeal like a champ.

Through all this, Mabel is still an incredibly sweet gal, and she’s grateful to all for helping her heal. She’s recovered well, and her legs have healed in all but one small spot on her left leg. It’s a highly mobile area, and the skin is tight with scar tissue. There’s about a quarter sized spot that is as stubborn as Mabel. On a positive note, Mabel made it through the 2020 fly season with minimal issues; however, she was on a steroid and antihistamines to help with itching from flies. We also used a war chest full of fly products and used hock shields to protect her scarred areas. It all worked quite well.

So, the bestMabel has an extreme sensitivity to flies, and she is high maintenance during fly season. She needs an adopter who can commit 100% to her fly control/fly management two to three times a day. This year, we used hock shields to cover the scarred areas, and they were effective, but they can’t be used long term because they cause rub sores. Mabel is a sweet and friendly donkey who is mostly easy to handle. She’s not crazy about the farrier, but does well with sedation.  Mabel is looking for an experience burro/donkey home. Mabel and Sandy, our other burro, are bonded and get along very well. Ideally, they will find a home together.

The most fun part of the year was when Mabel met Sandy…..or when Sandy met Mabel? Sandy hadn’t been around another donkeyburro for about seven years. The photos say it all. How sweet is that? They have been together ever since.

They’re waiting at the gate for you. Mabel says she really loves it here at AAE, and she loves all of the wonderful volunteers, be she’s really ready for happily ever after! Are you the one to make her holiday wishes come true?

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes allow us to make this work possible!

Give the gift that keeps on giving by sponsoring a horse on behalf of a horse-loving friend or family member!

As a sponsor, your annual or monthly contribution helps support the costs of care for a specific horse.

You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. You will receive an electronic “gift letter” with a photo of an AAE horse, acknowledging your gift on behalf of your recipient.

Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Patriotic Mustang T-Shirts

Horse fans will love this shirt!

The Patriotic US Flag/Mustang image on front and Mustang is My Favorite Breed (or Rescue is My Favorite Breed) in white on back. Available in Black, Ash Gray, Navy, and Brown.

Orders may be picked up at the AAE Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs or

shipped for an additional cost.

Order Now!

 

Stop by the AAE Used Tack Store to find the perfect gift for the horse lover in your life! Don’t know what they need? We have gift cards, too!

 

Here are more ways you can help!

Doing any winter cleaning? Donate your gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g. clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales help pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Donate Tack!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse?

Check out our current horses

If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete AAE’s

Adoption Inquiry Form

Adopt a Horse!

 

 

 

URGENT 911 FOR MORE BABIES – WE NEED TO SAVE THE “CHRISTMAS CREW”. THE CLOCK IS TICKING – CAN WE SAVE THEM?

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

A winter 911 – The shipper called4 ??? (and possibly more) babies at the feed lot. No chance to save the rest of them, so we need to make sure we get these little ones to safety.

Without your love and support, I cannot save their precious little lives.

So please, let’s give these babies a Christmas Miracle. Their lives have been horribly disrupted. They have been rounded up and will now lose their entire families. I DO NOT have the option to save their families, and it makes it even more urgent that we save the ones we can.

This is NOT the time of year to be driving up to WA to get babies. However, God put them in front of me, so once again I am asking y’all to step up and help save these precious lives.

Please help if you can. Our funds are extremely low, and YOU, decide if we can save these babies. The Christmas Crew needs your help ASAP!

Thank you as always for all y’all doTogether we have saved so many lives. Let’s “git ‘er done”.

We have Lady Love’s eye removal, Big Matt’s sedation to get his feet trimmed and the goat’s leg amputation scheduled for next Monday,(If funding allows). We also still need to geld Grandpa and Hawk, (weather and funding allowed). Tucker is also scheduled to have his knee worked on. He has been on major antibiotics, but he is still struggling with his injured leg. I am saying my prayers it is not in his joint, but his leg is not improving like Doc hoped. So not only will we have the vet bills for the new kids, but are looking at a substantial vet bill in NV coming up.

So please, help us give the Christmas Crew a little bit of Merry Christmas…. Let’s save their lives.

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

Miss Annie Oakley says “thank you” for saving my life!!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Day 15: It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!

0

The following is from All About Equine Animal Rescue:

As we count down to 2021, join us every day this month as we share stories from the barn that show how your support has helped horses in 2020.

With the uncertainties and challenges of this year, we truly appreciate your generosity and support.

GYPSY

ypsy is a mustang mare that was captured as a long-yearling in the Calico Roundup in one of the Calico Mountain HMAs in NV, so she was born around 2008. She was subsequently adopted as a long-yearling/two year old from the Broken Arrow (aka Indian Lakes) holding facility in Fallon, Nevada, then placed at DreamCatcher Wild Horse and Burro Sanctuary. Gypsy spent nearly a decade roaming free at DreamCatcher before coming to AAE in April 2018 after the long illness and passing of DreamCatcher’s Executive Director, Barbara Clarke.

Gypsy came with her young filly, Calico Girl, to avoid the harsh winter at the sanctuary. They were quite the confident pair when they arrived. Gypsy was very laid back and curious about humans, at arms length. She’d accept a rub on her forehead and neck, but she made clear it was on her terms (in a nice way). “Nope, nope, don’t think so”. She was bossy with the other mares and foals, and Cali Girl aspired to be just like mom. Quite boldly, and only weeks old, she would push the other moms and foals off feed. They quickly made their way to their own paddock so the others could eat in peace.

Gypsy is beautiful, stout and lest we forget, dominant, but with a kind soul. After weaning her filly, she softened incredibly and became a most agreeable, sweet, and willing gal. She became best buds with Blue in the pasture.

Later, when opportunity arose, Gypsy spent several weeks at the Monty Roberts International Learning Center as a part of the Advanced Course for Horsemanship where she had extensive groundwork and was introduced to a saddle. She made great progress!

When she returned to AAE, we continued her training and confidence building. She’s a smart mare and quick learner, but she had a very hard time connecting with and trusting her handler. Gypsy was willing, but reserved and seldom relaxed. We knew she had so much potential, and with the right person, she would forge a remarkable bond.

She met that person! Gypsy spent some time with a foster trainer; she broke through and the two developed a lovely bond. There were many moments of whoa, then go, but in the end, it was YES!! We are so incredibly grateful, her foster decided to make Gypsy part of her family! We can’t wait to for updates from these two. So happy for you, Gyps!

This holiday season please consider making a year end donation to assure AAE has funding to continue the work we do and have similar stories to share in 2021

Thank you for your support helping horses each and every day!

Your donations, volunteering, adopting, and social media shares & likes allow us to make this work possible!

Give the gift that keeps on giving by sponsoring a horse on behalf of a horse-loving friend or family member!

As a sponsor, your annual or monthly contribution helps support the costs of care for a specific horse.

You can sponsor at any level or any amount you choose. You will receive an electronic “gift letter” with a photo of an AAE horse, acknowledging your gift on behalf of your recipient.

Choose a horse to sponsor today!

Patriotic Mustang T-Shirts

Horse fans will love this shirt!

The Patriotic US Flag/Mustang image on front and Mustang is My Favorite Breed (or Rescue is My Favorite Breed) in white on back. Available in Black, Ash Gray, Navy, and Brown.

Orders may be picked up at the AAE Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs or

shipped for an additional cost.

Order Now!

 

Stop by the AAE Used Tack Store to find the perfect gift for the horse lover in your life! Don’t know what they need? We have gift cards, too!

 

Here are more ways you can help!

Doing any winter cleaning? Donate your gently used tack to AAE’s Used Tack Store in Shingle Springs. We very much appreciate tack donations delivered to the store in sale ready condition (e.g. clean, conditioned, oiled). Please email tack@allaboutequine.org for information about donating or to schedule a delivery.

Proceeds from used tack sales help pay for feed, veterinary expenses, and other operational needs.

Donate Tack!

Have you considered adopting a rescue horse?

Check out our current horses

If you are interested in adopting one of our beautiful animals, please take time to complete AAE’s

Adoption Inquiry Form

Adopt a Horse!

 

 

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