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All Posts Tagged Tag: ‘stallion’

It’s Time to Speak up for Wild Burros

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Wild horses & burros need your help!

Guest Blog: It’s Time to Speak up for Wild Burros

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the US Forest Service, and the National Park Service have long treated these long-eared equids with disregard and deliberate misinformation campaigns. Cattle grazing, road-building, big game hunting, gold and lithium mining and other commercial uses erode their habitat and damage their access to water.

With Deb Haaland as Secretary of Interior, there’s a chance to change this harmful pattern. But it may not save their skins unless awareness leads to concerted action — and pronto.

In the spirit of Burro Awareness Month, we would like to share with you a guest blog about these incredible animals written by advocate and burro-extraordinaire, Charlotte Roe. After you read it, follow the link at the bottom to support America’s burros.

READ THE BLOG

Speak Up for the Sand Wash Basin Herd

You may be familiar with the Sand Wash Basin Herd Management Area (HMA) in Colorado because of the world famous stallion, Picasso who called this 157,000-acre public lands habitat home, and who died wild and free on this very land. Unfortunately, the surviving members of his herd may not be so lucky. 

The BLM is currently planning to roundup and remove over 80% of the Sand Wash wild mustangs, leaving only a population 163 — about 1 horse per every 980 acres!

Adding insult to injury, the local organization, Sand Wash Advocate Team (SWAT) has worked tirelessly to implement a PZP program to humanely manage the Sand Wash mustangs — and it’s working. Instead of a costly and cruel helicopter roundup, the BLM should invest more time and resources to support SWAT’s efforts and expand the PZP program in the HMA. This would be more humane for the horses and more cost-effective for the American taxpayers.

We must speak up for wild horses! Please take a moment and act today for the wild horses of the Sand Wash Basin >>>

TAKE ACTION

The Calico Complex is on the Chopping Block — Speak Out!

Photo: Mike Lorden

It’s unfortunately more bad news for the wild horses and burros that reside within the Calico Complex in Nevada. The BLM is targeting the estimated 1,700 wild horses and 70 wild burros for removal in this nearly 600,000-acre area. 

The agency is also considering extreme manipulation of the wild horse and burro population remaining on the range by implementing unproven IUDs over scientifically proven PZP fertility control, unnaturally skewing the sex ratio in favor of males, and managing a fourth of the population as non-reproducing, including by castrating stallions.

This is not right. Please take a moment to speak up for this historic population of wild horses and burros >>>

TAKE ACTION

Thank you for your support,

—The AWHC Team

StormySpookedCC

MULE CROSSING: Equine Behavior: Look Who’s Talking! Part 1

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By Meredith Hodges

What kind of equine handler are you? When interacting with your Longears or any equine, are you an observer or a participant? Are you fully aware of the reasons for your equine’s behaviors? Behavior in general is most often motivated by a stimulus that elicits a response, yet the early years of physiological development are most dependent on heredity. Heredity includes not only physical characteristics, but mental, emotional and instinctual behaviors as well. We are taught that if an equine’s knees are beginning to fuse, he is ready for training. Is the animal really ready for training just because his knees are beginning to fuse? Physical development is called maturation, and we often determine the equine’s capabilities by maturation alone, with no consideration for the whole animal.

The mule inherits its incredible strength, intelligence and freeze reflex from the jack, and its athletic ability, beauty and the flight reflex from the horse. Some of these characteristics are physical, while others are instinctual, but each contributes to the animal as a whole being. Mental and emotional personality traits are not as easily defined in animals, since they do not speak the same language that humans do. So it makes sense that the equine is often first regarded as a large and potentially dangerous “beast.” In the past, those men who overpowered the “beast” and gained control were revered by others for their ability, no matter how cruel the approach. Because of the vast difference in size, man was viewed as the underdog and his conquests were celebrated.

Characterology, man’s first exercise in psychology, is based solely on casual observations of the personality and individuality of a human being. This is how man initially perceived equines as well as himself in the early days of psychology. The evolution of man’s understanding of himself is not that different from his understanding of equines. It began with casual observations. The equine was first regarded as an animal to be feared because of its potential to do great damage to a person’s physical being. However, no regard was given to the horse’s propensity toward timidity and vulnerability as a prey animal. Man eventually got close enough to the equine to realize there was far more to learn than what he could simply observe. Characterology has been found to be as unsatisfactory when describing the whole human as it has turned out to be with equines.

We’ve learned, through observation, the behaviors the equine will exhibit when left to its own devices in its own environment. In a herd of wild horses, the stallion is king and there is only one mature stallion per herd. He may allow other young stallions to stay to the outside of the herd, provided they show no aggression. But if they do show aggression, the two will battle it out until the weaker one is either run off or killed.

The actual leader of the herd is the most dominant mare in the herd, called the “boss mare.” When the stallion signals danger, it is this mare that will lead the herd, while the stallion generally brings up the rear. During estrus, the mare cycles every 21 days during the warmer months of the year. The mare accepts the stallion for only seven days out of the 21-day cycle. The stallion may cover her several times during that period and will do the same with the other mares in the herd. Not all mares will accept the advances of the stallion at certain times and, because they are as different as people are in their genetic makeup, not all of them will become pregnant every time.

When it is time for the foal to be born, the mare will go off by herself to birth the foal and then return when the foal has gained enough strength to run with the herd. Equines will always show aggressive behaviors in a herd. It is their nature and they learn their place (“pecking order”) within the herd through this process.

Donkeys are a little different in their herd behaviors and, although they do have a “pecking order,” they operate more like a family and it is not unusual to see multiple males in the family herd. Donkeys have a freeze reflex instead of a flight reflex and will stand their ground before wasting energy in flight. Donkeys seem to be loving and affectionate creatures at first glance, but they can be a formidable rival to most any other animal. In certain situations with a well-planned psychological approach, donkeys can make good guard animals for the very same smaller animals that they might otherwise chase.

Being a hybrid, the mule possesses behaviors from both the horse and donkey. It is in the mule and donkey’s nature to chase smaller animals such as dogs, cats, goats, etc. When supervised, they can be taught not to attack smaller animals, but if left alone, it IS in their nature to run these animals down and they will often kill them for sport. This is not seen as often in the females (it depends on personality as well), but it is still present and should be heeded.

A mule will pin its ears when it is concentrating very hard and when it is following you and wants attention. Mules and donkeys are basically very friendly and rarely lay their ears flat back in pure anger like a horse will. When they are angry, you will know it. Scratching in different areas will produce different results. If you scratch their jowls, for instance, they may perk their ears forward, but when you rub their forehead, they will lay their ears back. If you scratch the insides of the ears, some will like it and tilt the head sideways with quivering eyebrows while others will jerk away at your impolite intrusion.

Donkey jacks really should not be allowed to roam with the jennets and/or mares and pasture breed since they can get angry at the drop of a hat and kill a weaker animal in an instant. It is even more dangerous to leave jacks with foals and horses (they will go after adult horses as well!). Mules, being half horse, will usually only chase other horses if they are smaller or if they are males. Since their dam was a female horse, they will often unintentionally harass female horses, but unless the mares are smaller or weak, the mules will do little damage and are more likely to receive a smart kick to the chest for their insolent behavior. Horses have a flight reflex when they feel threatened…the donkey has a freeze and prepare-to-fight reflex…and mules can go either way depending on the situation.

All of these characteristics are part of the equine whole, but they do not explain who the horse, donkey or mule is as a personality. Most characteristics are a means by which we can judge predictable behaviors that would be considered normal. People possess predictable behaviors that do not change and are valuable in profiling. Profiling enables one to establish a base from which to begin to determine a positive plan of approach that will elicit a positive reaction with any given person. The same is true in the development of the human/equine relationship. But Characterology was not a scientific approach, so man continued to find other ways to investigate and challenge his knowledge of himself and the equine.

Phrenology followed and was regarded as a true science, putting forth the idea that personality was comprised of “faculties” that were housed compartmentally in the brain. Therefore, an individual’s personality could be identified by the shape of his or her head. These same scientific observations were also made in reference to the equine.

At first, Arabian horses were thought to be silly and difficult—not the ideal mount for the common man. Later, the intelligence of the Arabian was discovered and explained by saying that, because the Arabian’s eyes are set lower in the head and the forehead is broader than most other equines, there is more brain space in the skull. This is also true of most mules and, particularly, Arabian mules. Once man believed in the equine’s intelligence and had a scientific reason for it, training was modified and approached a little differently. Man was then able to learn even more about the horses he was training. It wasn’t long before man discovered that this didn’t always hold true and there had to be more to consider when assessing the whole human being and, consequently, the whole horse.

The idea that body type could reveal personality type evolved from man’s belief that certain personalities were characterized by certain body types. Man applied this knowledge of psychology and behavior to equines, and then made generalizations about certain breeds of equines according to their body type and temperament. For instance, the solid body type and quiet temperament of the Quarter Horse denoted a capable, willing and even-tempered personality, while the more lithe body, tall stature and flightiness of the Thoroughbred yielded a personality that was more suspicious, aloof and, sometimes, difficult to train.

Much time has passed and man has learned that there is a lot to consider if we want to manage our equines in a healthy way and accomplish even the most basic performance with them. In the past, the prevalent belief was that, if you had a reasonably large patch of grass with a fence around it, you could have a horse. We now know it takes a lot more than this! Stay tuned for Part 2 of Look Who’s Talking, when we further explore the equine personality and how to develop the best relationship you can have with them.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2011, 2016, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

NEWBORNS ON THE FEEDLOT – ANOTHER 911 – SHIPPER CALLED – IT IS BEYOND GO TIME AND THE BABIES NEED YOUR HELP!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Wow – the insanity has already begunY’all JUST SAVED TEN MORE LIVES since I arrived in WA to pick up the Stallion and the 2 Pregnant mares!

I was getting ready to head back home to NV on Monday when I received another urgent phone call for an orphaned, abandoned foal. Then a call for an abandoned, injured, newborn orphaned lamb. It never stops!

This morning I had Doc come out and pull Coggins on “Nicholas”, (Our most recent Emergency), I was prepping to finally head home and my phone rang again. There are “tinies” at the Shipper’s and I should be getting them tomorrowSo apparently I am not going home anytime soon.

Sadly, NEARLY ALL the funds have been depleted on this last rescue. Every day that I am here, I have to have folks at home taking care of the rescue. Although most of their time is volunteer, it still adds up substantially. (They are amazing!) We also need to get another load of hay for the “special needs” kids at the rescue. Fuel costs are rising and that is a substantial cost for us even before the ridiculous prices we are already starting to see.

I have to get more shelter set up for these critical babies. As the numbers increase, so does the need for safe nursery space to give them what they need.

We spent roughly $2000+ simply to “save” these lives, and spent over $1,000 on vetting for health certs, (and that does not include the latest couple visits). That was just to get the horses to camp and keep them off the slaughter truck. (Just in the last 2 weeks). This DOES NOT include medical care, feed, hauling, etc. It is just a drop in the bucket of the rescue expenses.

I realize folks are struggling. However, I will keep fighting for these lives as long as I have the funding to do so. Sadly I have been warned that they are planning on “hitting it hard” this year because there are so many horses. So I am asking everyone who wants me to keep saving these precious lives to make it happen.

Great news however, these last horses that you saved are nearly all adopted, and yes, we saved the “3 Old Ladies”. They are currently in NV and being assessed. They are approximately 25 years old and sweet as can be.

Sadly we had to let Angel Face leave this world that was nothing but cruel to her. She was in excruciating pain and it was much worse the photos showed. She is running free in Heaven with the Angels and is finally free from the horrific pain. I am still working on the mare with the long feet. However, her owner did get them trimmed (how well I don’t know), and supposedly the vet is going to assess her. I am still on standby. I know it costs a lot to set these souls free, but it is the right thing to do! It is beyond devastating and it feels like you are being torn apart, yet I will always do it if no one else will.

When you see Angel Face below, please know that your love and support ended her horrible suffering. YOU made such a difference for this beautiful soul by alleviating her endless pain. THANK YOU!

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

ANGEL FACE says – “Thank You So Much, for Helping End My Years of Suffering!” I am running free through the grassy fields!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

TODAY – 911 CALLS from TRAPPER & THE SHIPPER. UPWARDS OF 8? BABIES and THAT IS JUST TODAY! FUNDS NEEDED ASAP TO SAVE THESE!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

More babies and a rare chance to save a beautiful stallion. They need YOU to save their lives. I received a call from the shipper and one of the catchers today.

Sadly, our coffers are close to empty. I still need about $5000 to cover the latest group’s shipping, vetting and to pay the wonderful folks who are taking care of the critters and our special needs kids in NV, while I am up here rescuing. I realize the groups are running together, (believe me, I want to go home…) But as usual, in the middle of the last 20+ rescued, as I wait for paperwork I get another call for more.

MORE BABIES need us NOW! I have to give the catcher and trapper an answer by tomorrow to see if we can take on the new ones in front of us. We need to save the stallion too. LET’S SAVE THEM ALL!!

I realize the pandemic has wiped out so much income and caused so much hardship, and I so appreciate every penny that has been donated.

However, I can only rescue as many critters as I have funds for. I need to raise the funds to finish this last group (we still have 12 available for adoption) and then have enough to safely and responsibly save this next group.

I will keep going as long as I can, but right now I cannot responsibly say yes to more horses without your help and commitment!

WILL YOU HELP ME SAVE THEM? Just this morning they were with their families. Tonight, alone but together, they scream for their Mama’s and their band. Please help us give them the gift of life. I asked, and there is no where else for them to go, and we all know what that means.

Some sad/glad news, we had to say goodbye to Ranger today. Ranger was a supposed 20 year old that y’all saved years ago. In reality he was 30 ish at the time and he has spent the last years in absolute heaven on earth with a wonderful family and their 3 kids. He has been a special needs and on mash and this morning I had to say goodbye. He had the most beautiful ending to his life, but it still hurts and it broke my heart.

THIS is a big part of what y’all do. You not only save lives, but you give these animals the most precious gift possible, by allowing them to be loved and spoiled the last years of their lives.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

HEARTBREAK LIKE NEVER BEFORE – HUMAN FAMILY TRAGEDY – EVIL LANDLORD AND BELOVED HORSES WITH NO WHERE TO GO!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

I don’t even know how to write this postA happy family, a horse trainer by trade, a gorgeous stallion raised from birth – and in a split second – tragedy struck.

That horrifying day, their beloved stallion turned without warning, charging and stomping his owner in the face, nearly to death. If his wife hadn’t interfered, it would have been over. His injuries were horrific and devastating. After fighting through and conquering life threatening injuries and unbelievable pain, his world would once again collapse.

With the craziness today, no financial help was available. On top of that, their home was sold out from under them with no warning from an unethical landlord. With no warning, only days to move, no income and still fighting ongoing, life threatening issues, they had no choice. THEY HAD TO FIND SAFE HOMES FOR THEIR HORSES!

This is what rescue is supposed to be about. These amazing people did EVERYTHING right. Yet they were dealt every heartache imaginable. It is obvious that when the choice was there, the horses and animals were cared for first. Now they simply need our help.

Chilly Pepper was asked to step up and take on the horses until we can find homes. Some of these horses are well trained, valuable, papered horses and the only money these folks have to survive on is what we can pay for their beloved “kids”.

I saw them today. We sat and cried and talked about why things happen and having faith that somewhere out there is something better. Trusting God is the only way to survive something so hard. At this point he cannot even step into the pen. The slightest bump could end everything, his injuries are that severe.

Let’s help at least keep his horses safe. I will be picking them up and getting them vetted before bringing them to NV. We are praying folks will step up to purchase them as there are some wonderful horses available. THE FAMILY WILL BE PAID FOR THEIR HORSES! (We also need to cover vetting, transport, care and feed etc. until they are all re-homed.)

Imagine the horse you raised from a baby “snapping” in a single second. On top of that, your income is gone, your heart is broken, and in the struggle to take care of your family and do what is best for your horses, your heart once again is breaking into a million pieces. These horses simply have no where to go.

So let’s show this family that there is still love out there in spite of all the ugliness.
It’s time to do everything we can to show love and compassion and keep his horses safe.

The tears are pouring once again as I write this. I live with chronic pain, but there is nothing like the pain of not even being able to go and love on your horse. He is struggling so hard to do the best thing for not only his horses, but his family. Please help us help him!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Help us reunite Samson with his family and bring him home for the holidays

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

News & Alerts

With a heavy heart, we have sad news to share with you.

The Bureau of Land Management set up a trap outside the Fish Springs Herd Area near Gardnerville, Nevada to remove wild horses over the Thanksgiving holiday. Unfortunately, an entire family of wild horses lost their freedom as a result. Two treasured stallion brothers and four generations gone in a flash.

This is Samson.

Samson is a beautiful and respected stallion, known and loved by the local community — And known internationally among the tens of thousands of people who keep up with him and his fellow Fish Springs horses on Facebook.

After being caught in the trap, Samson and his family were loaded onto trailers and shipped to BLM holding pens near Reno. Soon the family could be separated by the BLM and sold off to the highest bidder.

We know Samson and his family belong together and deserve to be free. That’s why we’re organizing a national petition drive to keep them together and return them to the wild.

Add your name on our official petition: Join thousands in calling on the BLM to keep Samson’s family together by returning them to their home in the wild, where they belong!

Samson’s family includes his brother Jet, and his mares Old Momma, her daughter Apple, Apple’s daughter Dumplin’ and Dumplin’s baby little Sam (pictured together below). Old Momma has been on the Fish Springs Range for more than 20 years and wants to go home.

They lost their freedom because one resident called the BLM to formally complain about these wild horses on his property.

The local community pressure was enormous, calling on the resident to remove the trap, which he finally did.

The very person who called in the complaint with the BLM regrets doing so and wants Samson and his family to stay together on their home range in Fish Springs.

This holiday season let’s make sure that happens. Sign our petition urging the BLM to return Samson and his family to their home on our public lands.

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

P.S. — The BLM’s removal of Samson and his family shows, once again, the heartlessness of this agency’s wild horse and burro management policies. Please consider supporting our work to fight these policies and keep wild horses and burros in the wild by making a donation (every dollar makes a difference in this critical fight!)

 

Give Now

NEARLY ALL ARE SAFE, BUT WE NEED TO SAVE ONE MORE…. We have a YOUNG, ONE EYED STALLION WHO WANTS TO GET ON OUR TRAILER, NOT THE SLAUGHTER TRUCK.

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Quick update.

ONE MORE LIFE TO SAVE – A YOUNG STALLION WHO IS BLIND IN ONE EYE. HE NEEDS YOUR HELP TONIGHT!, and then our trailer will be full.

We (YOU) SAVED ALL 4 of the Yakima foals. One of them already has a potential adopter and thankfully the other 3 will be heading to one of our favorite “partners”, whom we work with every year and who is not only an angel, but an excellent “foal mama”. So ALL these are safe and will shortly be off of our feed bill as well.(We will be helping out with a small care package, but Dannielle will be saving the rescue a great deal of time and money and find the WA babies their perfect forever home.)

We were able to commit to save 3 horses, 2 donkey stallions, a mini and 1 heavily pregnant donkey mama. (The other 2 we were orginally trying to save were lucky and found other homes.

However, we have ONE MORE we NEED TO SAVE ASAP! He is a stallion, who is blind in one eye and needs to stay out of the slaughter pipeline. We always try to pull a few stallions no matter where we are as they often have so little chance to be saved.

We have most of the kids paid for, but sadly my truck is in the shop to the tune of about $1500. (We have already put over 30,000?? miles on her this year, and she is running strong but needed some new seals and a couple of repairs to avoid a major one). We just paid $443 to the vet in WA to get the health certificates and Coggins test so the 4 can go to their new homes, and we need a bit more funding to pull off saving the stallion and to keep the rescues, new saves and deliveries on the road.

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR SAVING ALL THESE LIVES. LET’S MAKE SURE WE CAN ADD THIS YOUNG, PARTIALLY BLIND STALLION TO THE HAPPY LIST!

BELOW:
THANK YOU FOR SAVING US!!! OUR LIVES MATTER!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundmel

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

                                                                                     ->You can donate via check at:

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

295 Old Hwy 40 East, # 190

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GOD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

Donate to Help

These photos say it all

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

This is how the BLM rounded up 30 wild horses last week in Utah:

Our team captured these photos of the helicopter hazing horses, causing some to crash through barbed wire. These photos have already reached 1.4 million people on Facebook alone!

This may be a tipping point for this movement, but we need your help to keep our observers in the field.

Right now, our observer is in Wyoming’s Red Desert, where the BLM is rounding up 1,400 wild horses from our public lands. At least six horses have died in the first five days of the roundup, including:

  • Two foals who were run to death. (“capture shock”)
  • One foal who was euthanized after breaking his leg
  • A six-year old stallion who was “injured and blinded by another stallion on a trailer”

We are the eyes and ears on the ground, holding BLM accountable for these cruel roundups. Please help keep our team in the field.

Sincerely,

The AWHC Team

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