Monthly Archive for: ‘August, 2021’

Today is the last day to speak up for the Sand Wash Basin wild horses >> ACT NOW!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

One day. That’s all the time the Sand Wash Basin horses have left. On September 1st, the helicopters will descend on little Desiree and her herd. One day. That’s how long we have to speak up for them.


Photo by: WilsonAxpe Photography

Please take one minute now to:

  1. Send a message to the U.S. Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Land Management and follow up with calls.
  2. Post this graphic to the following pages. (Note: some of these pages might not allow you to post directly, but you can leave a comment with the image!)
  3. Send automated Tweets to decision makers.

Thank you for speaking up for Colorado’s wild horses! 

— AWHC Rapid Response Team

CHILLY PEPPER – Urgent 911 – We have a RARE CHANCE to save the whole Band! Deadline to Commit is 24 hours!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Another 911 – Catcher Called! – Deadline to commit is 24 hours!!

I don’t even know what to say. I am so excited to think we could save the entire family. I was told there is a stallion and 5 others, one of whom is said to be blind.

I want to say Yes!! Sadly finances are still a huge issue.

Even after today (I paid nearly $700 to Harrah Vet, (on top of the last $1800) for Coggins, and $1500 to Goldendale), there is still a balance of $2500 to pay off. Thank you Janet for your amazing donation of $1000 for the vet bill at Goldendale.

Mia needs x-rays. She is spunky, bossy and doing well, but we are still not sure about her legs. Doc said bring her in for x-rays. Sadly I need to pay off the $2500 bill at Goldendale first.

I need funds to purchase the band, get them vetted, get the boys we have gelded, transport them home and buy groceries for everyone.

PLEASE HELP ME SAVE THIS FAMILY!

Thank you for your continuing support. Together we are saving so many lives.

Please check out the New Adoption page! We have a new and improved page. I know folks enjoy sharing the horses and their progress with all of you.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
C/O Melody LeBeau
1630 Pumphouse Rd
Toppenish, WA 98948

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our NEW Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

BELOW: Meet Betty. This beautiful filly is looking for her forever home!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Colorado wild horses need your voice RIGHT NOW!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Right now the Sand Wash Basin wild horses in Colorado need YOU to be their voice. This iconic herd is currently in the BLM’s crosshairs and the emergency roundup will begin in just two days, on September 1st.

The BLM’s decision to deploy helicopters in the Sand Wash Basin Herd Management Area (HMA) is driven by the claim that the drought is so extreme that 733 wild horses must be permanently removed, BUT on the ground, recent rains have filled watering holes and rejuvenated vegetation growth. Most importantly, the wild horses remain in good body condition.

In short, there is no drought emergency in the HMA to justify displacing nearly 90% of the herd by stampeding and capturing them in a helicopter roundup that will rob hundreds of horses of their freedom and families, and cost many their lives.

Time is short, so please take action NOW to ask the BLM to halt the roundup, drop the emergency designation, and work collaboratively with stakeholders to develop a humane long-term management plan to protect the Sand Wash herd.

 

TAKE ACTION

 

Thanks for your support,

AWHC Rapid Response

My time on Nevada’s Virginia Range

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

I’m Tracy — a Project Coordinator and Virginia Range volunteer for the American Wild Horse Campaign (AWHC).

I joined AWHC to help manage fertility control data and other projects on the Virginia Range. This range might sound familiar … that’s because it’s where AWHC operates the world’s largest humane management program for wild horses!

AWHC’s PZP fertility control program has proven that there is a humane way to manage wild horse populations that doesn’t require mass roundups, crowded holding corrals, dangerous sterilization, or slaughter. And being able to contribute to this historic initiative … well that has been the experience of a lifetime!

I’ve truly cherished my time working on the range — so much so that my volunteer responsibilities continue to evolve and expand! Not only do I manage the PZP database, I am on the range working as a spotter and documenter alongside PZP darters too! I also serve as a member of the Technical Large Animal Rescue team, so I’m always on call to help the Virginia Range wild horses!

I’ve grown to love each of these beautiful animals. So much so, that I’ve dedicated my time to helping nurse rescued, orphaned foals back to health so that they can be adopted out to loving families. My husband and I even adopted two mustangs from the Virginia Range! 

The work AWHC is doing to protect the lives of America’s wild horses and burros is oh so important. These majestic animals are under almost-constant attacks and so it is up to us to stand up for the rights of wild horses and burros.

I have the opportunity to see firsthand how AWHC is protecting the rights and lives of America’s wild horses and burros. So, I wanted to ask — will you make a donation of whatever you can afford today to help fuel the important work AWHC is doing?

DONATE TODAY

Thanks for your support,

Tracy Wilson
AWHC Virginia Range Project Coordinator

CHILLY PEPPER – We have water! Meet the kids in VC, NV

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

PTL! We have water at Chilly Pepper in NV.

We ended up spending a little over $3500 for the new pump, wiring, pipes n even improved the water lines a little bit.

So many folks stepped up to try n help. Thank you to everyone who donated to help with the well, etc.

We are now working on the hay, rescue supplies and vet bills. I was told I need to pick up more horses in a couple days

Sadly Delgado is still a stallion. He is only the 2nd one I have watched in over 23 years, work himself up so much that the drugs wouldn’t work. We ended on a very quiet note, but now Doc has to come out again. It actually turned into quite the training session.

Anyone in NV who would like to meet Mia & Ford in person, come join us for some Sunshine & Smiles next to Piper’s in Virginia City between 3-5 on Friday. (Friday 27th)

Thank you for your continuing support. Together we are saving so many lives.

Please check out the New Adoption page! We have a new and improved page. I know folks enjoy sharing the horses and their progress with all of you.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
PO Box 233
12965 Green Saddle Drive
Golconda, NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our NEW Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.) Due to a facebook glitch, I am actually blocked off the old page, so we started a brand new, improved one.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

BELOW: Meet Betty. This beautiful filly is looking for her forever home!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

Augie Spuds 10 21 16 056

Longears Music Videos: Because It’s There: Miniature Donkeys Augie and Spuds

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See more Longears Music Videos

CO-02: we need your help!!

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

On behalf of the American Wild Horse Campaign and our Government Relations team, I wanted to say thank you. Your continued support helps us keep up our legislative fight to protect the rights of America’s wild horses and burros. Just this year, your support helped us to secure $11 million for fertility control funding in the U.S. House!

Unfortunately, over the last few months especially — the freedom of these cherished animals has faced constant threats. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) continues to conduct brutal helicopter roundups of federally-protected wild horses.

And this year, more horses will be in government holding than ever before. There are already over 50,000 wild horses and burros that have been stockpiled in government holding at the expense of taxpayers, and by the end of this fiscal year (Sept. 30) this number will skyrocket to at least 60,000. 

Thankfully, we have some members of Congress who stand alongside us in our fight to protect wild horses and burros!

Your U.S. Representative Joe Neguse has always been a steadfast advocate for wild horse and burro protection, and he and several other members of Congress have advocated for alternatives to cruel roundups, including Appropriations legislation that would ensure that a significant portion of funding for the Wild Horse and Burro Program would go to:

  • The implementation of humane birth control;
  • Prioritization of public-private partnerships with nonprofit organizations;
  • A permanent ban on barbaric mare surgical sterilization;
  • And a requirement that the BLM evaluate and report on formerly zeroed-out wild horse areas for relocating horses as an alternative to holding facilities.

Rep. Neguse is also in a prominent position, as the Chair of the Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands for the House Natural Resources Committee, with influence over bills that could impact wild horses and burros. 

Will you contact Rep. Neguse right now to thank him for his leadership to protect wild horses? Ask him to do all he can to fight for these cherished animals today!

CONTACT REP. NEGUSE

Thank you for your support,

Holly Gann Bice
Director of Government Relations
American Wild Horse Campaign

Have you thought about your legacy?

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Did you know that August is National Make-A-Will Month?

The subject can seem daunting … but it’s oh so important! Not only does creating a will give peace of mind and a sense of security to you and your family — but it’s a great way to create a lasting legacy for the causes you care about.

Planned gifts like wills and trusts are some of the best ways to help the charities you care about long after your lifetime.

Special gifts like these help our amazing team implement the best possible programs to protect wild horses and burros. If you’re curious how you can add a Legacy Gift on behalf of America’s wild horses to your will, check out our info on it here:

MAKE A LEGACY GIFT

Many American Wild Horse Campaign supporters have already opted to include a Legacy Gift in their will, ensuring that their legacy and passion for wild horses will be remembered for many years to come.

So when you plan your future, think about including the fight to protect wild horses in it!

– AWHC Team

P.S. Interested in other ways to give? Check out all the ways you can help wild horses!

CHILLY PEPPER – Urgent help needed! NO WATER at the rescue The horses need your help now!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

When it rains it pours.

We have NO water at our rescue in Nevada. The pump has burned out. The cost to locate the well, (no one has any idea where it actually is), replace the pump and get the water going will be anywhere from $1,900 to $4,000 depending on whether we need to rent an excavator, and how long it takes to actually get water. As for now we will be paying folks to truck it in.

(Luckily our ladies who take care of the rescue while I am not there have made sure the horses are ok up to this point.)

It is past time to order a load of hay before supplies run out and the prices jump even higher. We are looking at a truck load around $6500 for the NV horses. As most everyone knows, there is a critical hay shortage and it is imperative we get what we need for winter now while there is still hay available.

I am on standby for some extremely emaciated mustangs. Their range has zero feed and almost no water. They are supposed to be coming for the next couple months. The pictures I was sent were extremely hard to look at and many of them are literally at death’s door. I need to stock up on supplies for the care they will need. At this time I am loading up the trailer with milk, pellets, electrolytes, meds etc. I have no idea how many or exactly when they will call. I was just asked to be ready and on stand by.

Please check out the New Adoption page! Due to technical difficulties, I have been blocked (glitches anyone???). So we now have a new and improved page. I know folks enjoy sharing the horses and their progress with all of you.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
PO Box 233
12965 Green Saddle Drive
Golconda, NV 89414

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our NEW Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.) Due to a facebook glitch, I am actually blocked off the old page, so we started a brand new, improved one.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

BELOW: Meet Betty. This beautiful filly is looking for her forever home!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

MULE CROSSING Showing In Harness7

MULE CROSSING: Showing in Harness

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By Meredith Hodges

Now that you have spent many months teaching your mule to drive and he is doing so well, you have decided that it might be fun to show him in harness. So, what are that kinds of things that a judge looks for in a driving class of mules? Well, it’s basically the same as it is with horses.

The first and foremost consideration for a judge is your mule’s manners. His manners will exhibit just how safe your mule is for driving. As with people, a judge can get an overall impression from the expression on your mule’s face! An attentive and pleasant expression is definitely preferred. The expression on his face will reflect his overall comfort within a situation. If he is comfortable, he responds to minimal aids calmly, confidently, yet promptly. He should reinback easily upon request, and stand quietly at the halt with all four legs squared. His ears will be relaxed, but attentively turned to the driver most of the time. Ears that are rapidly in motion indicate anxiety and distraction.

A major contributing factor in your mule’s overall manners is his conditioning. If your mule has been brought along with a carefully planned exercise program, his muscle growth and strength will increase with little or no stress, as it should in most athletes. The mule that is conditioned in this way will have the strength to pull while maintaining a smooth, steady and effortless gait. He is comfortable in his work. Properly conditioned mules will not exhibit the tenseness that comes from overexertion, a tenseness that can inhibit his entire performance.

How can you tell if your mule is well-conditioned? Touching his body with your fingers at the neck, shoulders, barrel, loins, stifles and rump can tell you a lot. These muscles should be hard and not mushy to the touch. Standing behind your mule, you should begin to see considerable gaskin development. A driving class lasts approximately 20 to 30 minutes. If you condition your mule at the medium trot for 20 minutes straight, without any sweating or breathing hard, he should be able to handle the class with no problem. Another helpful hint is to condition him on uneven ground. Then, when he performs on the flat ground, it will seem a lot easier to him. Remember to condition slowly to avoid overexertion, muscle soreness or injury. If you condition your mule beyond what is expected in the class, you won’t have to worry about him being fit for class! And, as long as he is so well conditioned, be sure he is well-groomed as well.

Your mule’s way of going is another important consideration for the judge. In the driving class, your mule will be asked for the walk, collected trot, working trot and the reinback. The walk should be “regular and unconstrained, energetic, but calm with even and determined steps with distinctively marked four equally spaced beats.” In the collected trot, “the neck is raised, thus enabling the shoulders to move with greater ease in all directions, the hocks well-engaged and maintaining energetic impulsion not withstanding the slower movement.” The mule’s steps are shorter, but are lighter and more mobile. The working trot is a pace between the collected and extended trots. The mule “goes forward freely and straight, engaging the hind legs with good hock action, on a taut, but light rein, the position being balanced and unconstrained. The steps are
even as possible and the hind feet touch the ground in the foot prints of the fore feet.” The reinback is “a kind of walk backwards. The legs being raised and set down simultaneously by diagonal pairs, the hind legs remaining well in line and the legs being well raised.” The mule that is conditioned slowly with special attention given to core strength, straightness, balance and bend will begin to carry himself in good equine posture and exhibit these true gaits naturally after a period of practice time.

The next consideration is the appropriateness of the animal to the vehicle he is pulling. A smaller mule should never be used to pull a large wagon, nor should the larger draft mule be used to pull a pony cart! Select a vehicle that pulls easily for your mule and one that is proportionate to his size. The overall picture should be balanced and harmonious. Fifty percent of your total class score will include your mule’s manners, his conditioning, his way of going and the appropriateness of the general turnout.

Twenty percent of your total score is judged on you, the whip or teamster. Your hands should be held at waist level, about three inches in front of your body and about 10 inches apart. “A rein passes between the forefinger and middle finger of each hand and is held secure with pressure from the thumb; the whip is held in the right hand.” You should always sit in good posture and the use of your aids should be almost imperceptible. An expert Reinsman rarely exceeds a 12″ imaginary box around his hands. Your dress should be appropriate to the vehicle in which you ride.

For instance, a formal coach would require a more formal dress than would a two-wheel country cart. Dress must be conservative for the times. Western dress is permitted where appropriate. Hat, gloves, coat, tie, and a lap apron are required. A whip must be held in hand at all times! Always look where you are going, check the judge for instructions periodically and pay attention to spacing in the arena! The remaining considerations for a judge are the vehicle and the harness with each carrying 15% of your total score. The vehicle should be in good repair, appropriate size and style for your mule, and should fit him properly through the shafts and tugs. The harness should fit him as well as possible and should be adjusted correctly, especially the breeching so it can do its job in the reinback.

Often, it is difficult to find horse harnesses that will fit the lighter and smaller mules or donkeys properly, but you can approximate the size you need (i.e. pony, cob, horse, draft) and then make the necessary adjustments, or have a professional harness-maker help you. Your mule should be fastened snugly to the vehicle. Be sure that your collar or breast collar fits your mule properly as this can create soreness and make for a very unhappy mule! Adjust the breeching snugly enough to make your “brakes” effective! One of the most common mistakes made by beginning drivers is adjusting the breeching too loose. This makes it difficult for your mule to either slow down or back straight and evenly, and the resulting slack will make his transitions look abrupt and awkward!

There is a lot to consider as a driving judge, but judges are also human beings, and basically the judge is going to select those mules for placement in the class that HE would most like to drive. If you follow the guidelines that I have described, your Longears will be one of the judge’s favorites!

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1991, 2016, 2019, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.

Footage of the Onaqui herd release … you won’t want to miss it

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

A few weeks ago, I, along with several other AWHC representatives, had the opportunity to attend the release of 123 of the 435 wild horses captured during the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) roundup in the Onaqui Mountains Herd Management Area (HMA) in Utah the month prior.

While our hearts break for the 312 who will never see freedom again, we want to pause and recognize the significance of the return of these beloved wild horses — including 58 mares, 60 stallions, and 5 foals — to their home on our public lands. This brings the population in the Onaqui HMA to approximately 210 horses — the high end of the “appropriate” management level (AML). This is a departure from BLM policy, which generally aims to reduce horse and burro populations to low AMLs.

Watching these horses released to freedom was exhilarating, especially after seeing so many wild horses lose their freedom over the last decade. It is a memory I will cherish for a lifetime. Kimerlee Curyl, noted wild horse photographer and AWHC spokesperson, was with me on that day and recorded some footage that I want to share with you: 

The release wasn’t perfect. Three mares scheduled to be returned to the range became sick in the holding pens and died. A fourth mare is recovering in a BLM holding pen. One mare released to the range was observed to be sick and was euthanized hours after being freed. The BLM has yet to release the cause of the illness. Other released horses are being monitored for potential sickness. As soon as AWHC receives more information, we’ll be sure to let you know.

It’s important to remember that these tragedies are not the fault of any individual BLM employees, all of whom tried their best to ensure the safety of the horses. Instead, they are the inevitable outcome of a system that relies on capturing and penning these iconic wild animals instead of protecting them and managing them humanely in the wild.

AWHC fought hard against the Onaqui roundup and we continue to oppose helicopter roundups as a means of population control. But we were able to find common ground with the BLM on the return of some of the captured horses to the wild. 

The BLM allowed AWHC to designate a representative to be onsite at the trap during the roundup to identify horses and we were proud to partner with the Onaqui Catalogue Foundation (OCF) to get this job done. AWHC, OCF, and the Wild Horses of America Foundation also provided recommendations to the BLM on criteria for returning horses to the range based on genetic viability, social bonds, and the welfare of the more senior horses in the herd. This input was considered by the BLM when making the final release decisions.

Most importantly, BLM Utah has committed to working with us and others to ensure that this is the last helicopter roundup that will ever take place in the Onaqui Herd Management Area. 

We take the BLM at its word and will work with our partners and the agency to make this goal a reality. 

Over 300 of the Onaqui horses remain in BLM holding facilities and will be placed up for adoption and sale in an online auction beginning October 12. It’s our job to speak up for the wild horses of this cherished herd along with the thousands of other wild horses and burros that are rounded up year after year and we invite you to join us.

If you’re with us in the fight for freedom for America’s wild horses and burros, will you make a donation to AWHC to fuel our work today?

DONATE

Thank you,

Suzanne Roy
Executive Director
American Wild Horse Campaign

P.S. Check out our blog documenting the event for more information and footage of the Onaqui release!

WDD After The Winter Break 3 29 21 31

WRANGLER’S DONKEY DIARY: After the Winter Break: 3-29-21

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Wrangler is such a goof ball! Because Wrangler would lock up in front of the Tack Barn and not want to walk over the grate, I got smart and learned to take Chasity to the Tack Barn first. Then, he didn’t even notice the grate and walked right in! However, he gets pretty rambunctious about waiting his turn. I could lead them both at once, but he needs to learn to be by himself with me sometimes…and BEHAVE! When I first got Wrangler, he would get excited like this and then just try run over me when I opened the stall door. Through repetition and humane discipline, I changed his behavior with Behavior Modification, a systematic reward system of training. To be successful, one needs to target the behaviors that need to change, set up the equine for success and promptly reward the positive behaviors as they occur. AND, you need a specific, consistent and humane way to stop bad behaviors in their tracks when they occur. We work on the premise of POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT, but we also need to learn how to use NEGATIVE REINFORCEMENT if one does not want to be hurt, or even killed, by these VERY LARGE and STRONG animals!

The negative reinforcement that I use really works. When he got aggressive the first time, I raised my hand like a stop sign and when he did not stop, he got a firm slap to the side of his mouth as I said, “NO!” as loud as I could. I promptly raised my hand like a stop sign in front of his face again after which he started to turn back around. I quickly took a handful of oats from my fanny pack, took a step forward and offered him the oats. He did a double-take and came back for the oats to which I replied, “Thank you for giving me my space!” Going forward, he still occasionally gets too aggressive, but he always stops when I put my hand up like a stop sign in front of his face and takes a step back. He won’t need to be slapped again since this was done correctly the first time. He remembers!

As soon as I open the stall door now, Wrangler immediately stops his antics and becomes a gentleman that can be rewarded. He stands stock still while I put on the halter and then drops his head at my shoulder. I hold his lead rope in my left hand while pointing in the direction of travel with my right hand. I tell him to “Walk on” and look down to see what foot he is leading with and follow his front legs, step for step. We get IN SYNC with each other and I lead him that way from the time he leaves his pen to the time he returns. I do this the very same way with ALL of my equines ALL of the time. Consistency breeds familiarity and compliance.

Donkeys have issues with chronic runny eyes and noses. The way to stave off any infection is to clean their eyes, nostrils and ears with a damp towel daily. This also encourages them to accept handling around their face in general.

Donkeys are inherently desert animals and can severely founder or colic on lush feed. Symptoms of too rich feed will be manifested in the hooves as abscesses, crusty growth, collapsed heels and frogs, or just plain stress rings. Wrangler has abnormally small rear hooves and it is important that his core strength is developed in good postural balance to make sure the weight distribution is even so none of his hooves are carrying too much weight for his size.

Wrangler is rather flat-withered and needs a saddle that will “hug” his body, leaving ample room for his spine.

I initially tighten the girth snug, but not too tight. The crupper is adjusted so the tail lies comfortably.

I gently press on the bars of his jaw to open his mouth for the bit and carefully bring the crown of the bridle over his ears, protecting them with my hand. Being polite and considerate will get much more cooperation from your equine.

I adjust all the straps on the bridle so it is comfortable, paying special attention around the ears. The drop noseband helps him learn to hold the bit properly. I always gradually tighten the girth over several times.

The walk to the Round Pen is still IN SYNC…all three of us! Wrangler’s “Elbow Pull” postural restraint is adjusted and he is reminded how to release the tension.

Wrangler’s posture has greatly improved over three years and has given him added strength, endurance, stamina and animation to his gaits. He defies the slow and pokey characterization of donkeys in general! He’s a true athlete!

Wrangler and Chasity do a very nice reverse in sync with each other. Wrangler resumes the working walk.

Five rotations at walk, five rotations at trot, reverse and repeat in the other direction. We do 3 sets with a 3-minute break in between. Rewards are in order with every halt. With every halt, Wrangler is asked to rebalance and square up!

Then I begin riding with three rotations at trot in each direction. I carry a riding crop in case he needs a little encouragement to keep going. If he gets too tired, we call it quits and will do more another day.

I always end the sessions with a halt and rein back. Then I dismount and reward him again for a job well done!

Back in the Tack Barn at the work station, I carefully remove the bridle. I always hold the halter crown strap in my right hand while removing the bridle. I then slip the bridle onto my left arm, pick up the nose band of the halter in my left hand, bring it over his nose and buckle the halter. This way, if he pulls away, I still have my arms (and halter) around his neck to hold on to him.

We make our way back to the barn and Wrangler waits patiently while Chasity enters the stall first (Ladies first, you know!). He follows her sedately into the stall and they both turn around to me to have their halters removed and to receive their rewards. Wrangler “suggests” to me politely that I should hurry with Chasity’s halter and get to the rewards…QUICKLY! He’s still hungry!!! Silly boy!!!


LMV RollinAlong

Longears Music Videos: Rollin’ Along: Donkey Carts

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MULE CROSSING: Donkey Talk

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By Meredith Hodges

Donkeys are indigenous to desert areas that are often extremely hot or extremely cold. They are tough, surefooted due to the unique shape of their hooves, resistant to parasites, and disease and can withstand wide variations in climate. They require very little to survive and actually prefer the wide variety of brush and weeds that occur naturally in the desert with one of their favorite foods being dandelions.

Donkeys possess an incredible hair coat that does not shed off completely like horses do in the summer months. In their first year, a young donkey will keep his thick hair coat throughout the summer and won’t lose most of the hair until August.

In August, he will not have the thick hair coat, but will retain some longer, wispy hair unlike the horse. This thick hair is meant to insulate the foal against extreme heat and cold until he is able to develop enough body fat to help regulate the temperature throughout his body. It will stay thick inside the ears and will protect the donkey foal from parasites, bugs and severe trauma.

In one short month, the young donkeys will begin to grow back their thicker, winter under-coat in September in preparation for the cold.

As the donkey ages into the prime of his life, he has a covering of body fat to help keep his temperature insulated and the thicker hair is no longer as long and shaggy. Of course, there are some breeds of donkeys that will grow more thick hair than others, but the shaggy hair as an adult is generally reserved for the French Poitou Donkeys.

As the donkey gets to be over 25 years of age, he will begin to grow thicker hair year round to compensate for his loss of body fat due to old age.

January

August

When we show our donkeys, we body clip them, but if this is done, it is imperative to blanket them if it gets too cold and provide a light sheet during the cool summer nights.

Understand that they now no longer have the PROTECTION of their unique hair coat. When traveling, donkeys will sit back in the trailer and can rub themselves raw during the ride, especially if they have been clipped. When unclipped, the hair coat will keep this kind of damage to a minimum.

If your donkey does get these kinds of sores, they can usually be healed fairly quickly with a daily application of Neosporin ointment (Photo below was taken one week later). Note that when you clip, there is also the consideration of sunburn.

If you clip your donkey for show and need to haul any distance at all, you should protect his precious rear end by using a blanket or sheet secured over the hind quarters. The best course of action is not to body clip your donkey at all if you do not show. Remember, he’s a desert animal and Mother Nature has already provided him the protection that he needs against the elements.

 

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 2017, 2018, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

Tt 43

LTR Training Tip #43: Teaching Your Equine to Stand Still

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Whether or not your equine is calm enough to really stand still depends on all the lessons he has had and how they were executed.

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CHILLY PEPPER – Thank you!

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

I wanted to send out a big Chilly Pepper “THANK YOU” for all the love and support.

Without you, this simply would not be possible.

The donations of Foal Lac Powder, Foal Lac Milk, syringes, needles, bio sponge, probios, my beautiful blanket, Foal Response, thermometers, wipes, bandages, electrolytes, etc. etc. etc. are ALL BEING USED UP quickly. Every last item that has been sent is being put to good use.

Thank you. The donations, the help with vet bills, the list is endless, and it all adds up to saving these precious lives.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart. I so appreciate you.

Please check out the NEW ADOPTION PAGE! Due to technical difficulties, I have been blocked (glitches anyone???). So we started a new and improved page today. I know folks enjoy sharing the horses and their progress with all of you.

If anyone wants to help,

Supplies can be sent to

Palomino
C/O Melody LeBeau
1630 Pumphouse Rd
Toppenish, WA 98948

or Donations can be made at:

CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our NEW Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.) Due to a facebook glitch, I am actually blocked off the old page, so we started a brand new, improved one.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/543121366934903

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

BELOW: Meet Naveah. She was an emergency save in the middle of all the rest. I didn’t have time to post her rescue so here she is:

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

After The Winter Break 3 29 21 29

CHASITY’S CHALLENGES: After the Winter Break: 3-29-21

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Due to the colder and more inclement weather here in Colorado, Chasity has been off her exercise program for about three months. It was time to get back to work! No matter how long it has been between lessons, when you have a specific routine, the equines seem to comply easily because they know what to expect, beginning with going to their regular work station to be groomed and tacked up. In order to keep upper respiratory disease at bay, eye infections and ear problems to a minimum, it is advisable to clean these areas with a damp towel regularly. Be polite and wipe the towel in the direction that the hair lays and clean the nostrils with a circular motion. This repetition will prevent them from getting head shy.

Chasity still thinks the vacuum cleaner is questionable, but she tolerates it now. Not only does it pull the dirt from the skin for healthy hair growth, it also promotes circulation better than massage and does a better job at softening her “fat roll.” I used massage in the beginning when Chasity first came here with her enlarged crest (photo below on the right).

It had become somewhat enlarged again about three weeks ago, but after two sessions with the vacuum cleaner, it has decreased substantially already.

Another valuable therapeutic grooming tool is this simple human, multi-bristled hairbrush. It is not only VERY helpful during shedding, but also works to further stimulate the hair coat and promote better circulation, as well as efficiently removing dirt from the skin. I have found it to be more helpful for healthy hair than any equine grooming tools. The long, thick hair coats of winter and spring stay soft and healthy when I use this hair brush over the entire body. I only clip bridle paths when the weather gets warmer and I leave body clipping for showing. The only other grooming tools I use are a shedding blade to remove mud and a dandy brush to finish the coat. They can have balding spots from rubbing during the shedding season and may even get sores, but I just treat those with Neosporin and they recede quickly. A healthy hair coat will insulate your equine from the heat and cold and protect them from insects better than any artificial products or practices.

Equines do like feeling clean all over and really do appreciate your efforts at keeping them this way…although, they don’t necessarily show it when the first thing they do after a good grooming is to go for a good roll in the dirt!!! Still, they do seem to realize that you care and will show their appreciation in a multitude of other ways…like being happy to leave their companions to go with YOU and stand quietly during grooming, tacking and hoof care!

Feeding is a very important consideration for healthy hooves as are regular trims when needed, usually every 8-10 weeks. For donkeys, it can even be longer between trims when they wear their hooves in good balance. Chasity had hoof issues when she first arrived, but is now sporting healthy balanced feet! Remember that Longears will be more upright and have more heel than horses and ponies…and donkeys will typically be more upright and have more heel than mules.

Fitting saddles can be tricky. Make sure the saddle makes even contact behind the withers and over the back with relief from pressure over the spine. Many saddles sit too high and cause centralized and uneven pressure across the back. Pressure points are easily identified after a workout. The back will be sweaty, but the pressure points will be dry.

Place the saddle in the center of the back, behind the shoulder blade, the girth falling 4” behind the forearm where the skin is thicker and body begins to swell. I have successfully used cruppers with the buckles set away from the tail to hold it in place. The crupper is adjusted with just enough tension so the tail will still be able to rest comfortably.

I am using the neck sweat on Chasity for lunging to promote a decrease in the crest. When bridling, I press my thumb on the bars of her mouth to get it open and protect her ears with my hands as I pull the crown piece to the poll. This promotes trust and keeps any equine from getting ear shy.

On an English saddle there is a small d-ring that I use to tie up the reins.

Then it is off to the Round Pen. I always stay in sync with their front legs when we walk and execute the gates EXACTLY the same way EVERY TIME! All movements are predictable, never abrupt. They comply due to trust.

I adjust Chasity’s postural restraint, the “Elbow Pull,” and then remind her to give to the tension to get the release with a reward of oats for flexing at the poll. Wrangler, “Mr. Curiosity” watches intently…they do learn from each other!

Chasity’s overall posture has changed dramatically as has her movement. She uses her body much more efficiently.

Chasity has strong hind quarter engagement with an uphill balance to promote enthusiasm, endurance and stamina.

A reward is always in order for a job well done. Her forward stretch has improved greatly in one short year.

The lateral stretches are also much improved. After five rotations of walk, then trot, then reverse and repeat the other direction, 3 sets with a 3 minute break in between, then stop. Done once a week is adequate to maintain conditioning.

I hold the halter crown strap in my hand and protect her ears as I remove Chasity’s bridle. Then I slip the bridle onto my left arm, bring the noseband over her nose with my left hand and fasten the halter to the strap in my right hand. This ensures that I can keep hold of her should she try to pull away. Last, I fasten the tie strap from the hitch rail.

I always unfasten the girth on the left, then tie up the girth on the right, slide the saddle back, loosen the crupper from the tail and take off the saddle on the right side. This gets the equine used to being handled from BOTH sides. I always rinse the bits and wipe any dirt from the bridles and saddles before putting them away…saves work in the long run!

I remove Chasity’s neck sweat to see how much sweat is underneath…encouraging! We are definitely making progress!

To end, we do a few more stretches in each direction. These are improving immensely, too!

Then it’s walking IN SYNC back to the barn for turnout in the larger dry lot. They enter the stall, ladies first, and then they both turn around to allow me to remove their halters and to enjoy their last reward. I keep all my donkeys off grass most of the time. I find that they stay healthier and do not run the risk of getting obese that way. They do have large dry lots for turnout on pea gravel every day and a couple of acres of dirt pen for really stretching their legs every other day. They do get some grass when we go for walks, but do not seem to miss it most of the time. They are too busy playing and resting with each other…and looking forward to our next lesson TOGETHER!

LMV041919

Longears Music Videos: Up, Up and Away: Jumping

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What we’re doing to protect wild horses and burros

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The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Because of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) use of outdated and unproductive wild horse and burro “management” practices, nearly 60,000 wild horses and burros will be stockpiled in government holding pens and pastures before the end of this fiscal year (Sept. 30). This is the highest number of wild horses and burros ever maintained in the BLM’s holding facilities. 

There’s only one place the BLM’s roundup and stockpile system of managing wild horses is heading — it’s the mass slaughter of these cherished animals. Here at AWHC, we are doing everything possible to keep wild horses and burros wild and prevent this horrific outcome. Can you make a donation to the American Wild Horse Campaign today to help us continue our fight in the field, in courts, and on the Hill to protect wild horses and burros?

In the Field
We are not just demanding change, we’re proving that a better way is possible. AWHC’s highly successful fertility control program on the Virginia Range in Nevada has reduced the foaling rate in this historic mustang herd by over 50% in just over two years. The program is proving that humane fertility control is a viable alternative to costly and cruel helicopter roundups and removals — even in large wild horse populations in a large habitat area. 

Meanwhile, we continue to send observers to document most helicopter roundups taking place so that the public knows what is happening to our wild horses and burros in these remote areas of the West. We also hold the BLM accountable for the animal welfare violations we commonly see, such as stampeding horses in extreme temperatures, chasing horses in a manner that causes foals to be left behind (then roped and brought in), and capturing too many horses at once in too-small of pens, resulting in traumatic injuries such as broken legs and necks.

Our field work is building a powerful case for change that’s being noticed at the highest levels of Congress and the Administration. 

In Court
Our legal team works around the clock to defend wild horses and burros from government actions that violate federal laws and harm these cherished animals. Just this year, we filed suit against the BLM for the continued operation of the failed Adoption Incentive Program (AIP) that is sending far too many of our cherished wild horses and burros into the slaughter pipeline.

Currently, the BLM’s AIP program is an end-run around the Congressional ban on slaughtering wild horses and burros. We’ve documented scores of cases in which adopters are pocketing the $1,000 incentive payments then flipping horses or burros to kill pens as soon as the money clears their bank accounts. Our work even led to an explosive, front-page New York Times report on the program! Yet to date, the BLM has failed to conduct an independent investigation of the AIP or take meaningful steps to address the problem. So, we filed suit against the agency to ensure that this tax-subsidized slaughter program is shut down.

On the Hill
Our Government Relations (GR) team works in collaboration with other advocacy groups and members of Congress to ensure further legislative protections for wild horses and burros. Right now, our team is working to secure language in the Senate Interior Appropriations bill that would allocate $11 million of the BLM’s budget to implement a humane, reversible fertility control program to manage wild horses and burros in the wild. 

We’re also urging Congress to direct the BLM to implement on-range management strategies, such as relocating wild horses and burros to other suitable Herd Management Areas (HMAs) to reduce removals and keep these animals on the range where they belong. Earlier this year, we worked with members of the House of Representatives to get similar language passed in the House Interior Appropriations bill, and if this language is secured on the Senate side, it will be a historic legislative win for wild horses and burros! We also advocated hard for a provision in the INVEST Act to ban the transportation of equines to slaughter.

But it’s not just our GR team who is putting in the work! Part of our legislative fight is mobilizing AWHC’s grassroots army to contact the BLM, Forest Service, and Congress when wild horses and burros need help the most. It is because of your support that we are able to achieve significant wins, such as the $11 million for fertility control funding in the U.S. House!

There is so much at stake for wild horses and burros. That’s why we’re fighting back in every way possible to protect the rights and lives of these cherished animals. 

Can you make a donation right now to help us continue our fight in the field, in courts, and on the Hill to protect wild horses and burros?

DONATE

Thank you,

AWHC Team

 

CHILLY PEPPER UPDATE – Urgent help needed for this old man, PLUS 6 more babies and a gorgeous Stallion and pregnant mare

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The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

QUICK UPDATE! – THANK YOU SO MUCH for your donations and all the milk and supplies y’all have sent!

I received an urgent call for this emaciated grandpa. I honestly do not know if we can save him, but I am ready to try. Please help me save him.

Mia is hanging in there and taking teeny tiny baby steps forward. Ford is also still here.

I picked up 6 more babies and a wild stallion and his pregnant mare. I need help to pay for them and get hay, feed and supplies.

Please help if you can. I have also been called to help at a different location for an emergency rescue in a couple of weeks. Trying to get things in order, but I will need to restock everything. Drought and lack of feed are destroying their habitat and conditions are dire.

Thank you again for all your donations. Everything is being put to use and we are saving lives!

If you would like to help with our ongoing vet bills,

HARRAH VETERINARY 509 848-2943
GOLDENDALE VET CLINIC 509 773-0369

If you would like to order FOAL LAC & send milk, (Or baby wipes, vaseline, gloves, Foal Response, Foal Lac Pellets, syringes, Probios etc.)

Send to CHILLY PEPPER,

C/O MELODY LEBEAU

1630 Pumphouse Rd

Toppenish, WA 98948

509-985-8214
CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

Mia in her sling.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

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