Monthly Archive for: ‘June, 2021’

MVHitches

Miscellaneous Longears Music Videos: Multiple Longears Hitches

0

See More Miscellaneous Videos

ICYMI: Over 30 members of Congress have called on the BLM to suspend its’ AIP!

2

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

We wanted to make sure you heard about this exciting update:

Over the last week, 30+ members of Congress have called on the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to suspend an adoption program that’s sending wild horses and burros to slaughter. 

SIGN ON NOW TO DEMAND THE BLM HALT THE AIP >>


The recent groundbreaking New York Times report — prompted by an AWHC investigation of the BLM’s Adoption Incentive Program (AIP) — has led to national awareness about the plight of wild horses and burros, and has received significant attention from legislators on Capitol Hill.

Late last week, in a letter directed to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein (CA) called on the Interior Department to immediately suspend the BLM’s AIP and conduct a thorough investigation into the program that’s become a pipeline to slaughter for untold numbers of federally-protected wild horses and burros.

On Wednesday, U.S. Reps. Earl Blumenauer, Dina Titus, Steve Cohen, Jan Schakowsky, and Mike Quigley along with 25 of their House colleagues sent a similar letter to Secretary Haaland, asking that the AIP be suspended and calling for the passage of the Save America’s Forgotten Equines (SAFE) Act to protect all American horses from slaughter.

Thanks to your support and the buzz surrounding the New York Times article, significant action is being taken to protect America’s wild horses and burros! But Erica, we can’t stop now. Can you sign our petition and join Congress in demanding that the BLM halt the Adoption Incentive Program that’s sending wild horses and burros to slaughter?

SIGN THE PETITION

 
In coordination with our rescue partners, Evanescent Mustang Rescue, Skydog Sanctuary, and Black Hills Sanctuary, AWHC spent significant time searching for and accumulating tangible evidence to document the connection between the BLM’s AIP and the uptick in cherished wild horses and burros in slaughter auctions across the country — all leading to the New York Times exposé. 
We’re working with Senator Feinstein, Reps. Titus and Cohen, and many other members of Congress to put a halt to the AIP, pass federal legislation to help keep wild horses in the wild, and we’re fighting back against a dangerous bill that would strip away federal protections for wild horses and burros by allowing the BLM to trade away their habitats to states.

Erica, we’re doing everything we can to preserve and protect wild horse and burro herds across the U.S. Can you join us in our efforts by signing our petition and demanding that the BLM put an end to its disastrous Adoption Incentive Program?

SIGN THE PETITION

 
Thank you,
AWHC Team

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

0

The following is from the American Wild Horse Campaign:

Attention young horse lovers: Spirit Untamed premieres in theatres TOMORROW — and all of us here at AWHC are SO excited for this film’s debut!

In case you have yet to hear about the movie, it features a young girl named Lucky who moves to a new town where she befriends a wild mustang. Now, Lucky and her new friends must save a wild herd of mustangs from wranglers.

Not only is it great to see a movie that aligns so closely with our mission of protecting wild horses making it’s national debut — it’s also an amazing opportunity to inspire a younger generation of wild horse lovers!

If you want to check out the trailer ahead of tomorrow’s premiere, click here! And if you can, consider making a donation to support AWHC’s work in the field, in court, and on the Hill to protect America’s wild horses and burros.

It’s so important that the wild horse and burro issue is brought to the forefront. Just last week, the Biden Administration released its proposed budget for next fiscal year, and it included an increase of $36.8 million for the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Wild Horse and Burro Program — which could remove nearly 90,000 wild horses and burros from their homes on public lands.

You can bet we’re doing everything we can to fight back against this proposal, but one of the best ways to protect wild horses and burros in the years to come is to spread awareness around the issue!

If you’re eager to see Spirit Untamed or you want to help us further our efforts to protect wild horses and burros, click here to watch the trailer and then donate $25 to AWHC today!

DONATE & WATCH >>

Thank you,

American Wild Horse Campaign

BABIES KEEP COMING – 20 & ON STANDBY FOR MORE – CHILLY PEPPER NEEDS YOUR HELP NOW!

0

The following is from Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang:

Hi all,

(Seeing the pix is hard, but it’s a thousand times worse having to clean them out and take care of them. This is what I deal with every single day. It is horrible having to hurt them to help them. This is my reality.) It is heartbreaking.

As I write this, I have already been called for more horses…..

This is a very difficult update for me to write. Since that last group, I had 9 come in and then 11 more. Thankfully I am down once again to 16, thanks to some of the amazing folks that work with Chilly Pepper. And YES, MANY of these are also badly injured, as shown above. 4 were adopted – PTL!

Sadly, our funds are extremely depleted and we need more help before I can possibly think about taking on more babies Yet how do I say “NO”?

It COST $2000 EVERY MONTH just FOR ME TO BE HERE IN WA where I can save them. Between renting the property where I “camp” and paying the amazing folks who take care of the rescue at home, it is a HUGE hidden cost.

On top of the $4000 for March & April, IT COST $5600 to pay for the horses so they wouldn’t die a horrible death! That is ONLY to get them to camp. It does NOT include any vetting, milk, medical supplies etc. etc. So although we had some wonderful donations, $9600 was spent SOLELY on being here and saving the horses in the last 2 months.

I so appreciate every last penny and every single donation of milk and much needed supplies. HOWEVER, CHILLY PEPPER STILL NEEDS MORE HELP! We have had so many injured and special needs.

With the vet bills we were easily over $15,000, and that was for 2 months only. THANK YOU to everyone who helped with those.

It is excruciatingly expensive to do this. I live in NV. (At least I am supposed to). I end up “camping” in WA for months and months on end. THERE IS NO RESCUE IN WA that either CAN, OR WILL step up to do this.

God continues to put these lives in front of me so I will keep doing my best to save them. IF Chilly Pepper does NOT continue to do this, there will be nowhere for the babies and horses we save, to go. We also had to expand the critical care facilities due to the high number of injuries/ill babies.

I am exhausted and have seen more sadness this year than I can stand. However, I am so grateful for the amazing folks who are stepping up and taking on some of the less critical cases, and for Dustin’ Time Rescue who takes on extremely critical cases.

These horses deserve every chance and I WILL FIGHT WITH EVERY LAST THING I HAVE, BUT I CAN’T DO IT WITHOUT YOU! PLEASE help us keep saving them!

We so appreciate ALL YOUR LOVE AND SUPPORT! There are more babies coming and it looks like the year is going to be brutal. I cannot do this without you. Please say a prayer and let’s keep saving lives! It’s up to you!

If you would like to help with our ongoing vet bills,

HARRAH VETERINARY 509 848-2943
GOLDENDALE VET CLINIC 509 773-0369

If you would like to order FOAL LAC & send milk, (Or baby wipes, vaseline, gloves, Foal Response, Foal Lac Pellets, syringes, Probios etc.)

Send to CHILLY PEPPER,

C/O MELODY LEBEAU

1630 Pumphouse Rd

Toppenish, WA 98948

509-985-8214
CashAp-$LauriArmstrong
Venmo – @Lauri-Armstrong-2
Paypal-Palomino@chillypepper.org

THANK YOU for everything we have received. **

This is the link to our Chilly Pepper’s Wild Horse & Orphan Foal Adoption Page, where you can see the progress and new lives of the horses YOU HAVE HELPED SAVED! (I can’t believe I didn’t do this years ago, but it is so fun to see the horses, babies and critters that are enjoying and thriving in their new lives.)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/364129998164107/

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/55-0882407 If you shop at Amazon, please go to this link.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP HELPING US SAVE MORE LIVES, YOU CAN GO TO:

You can go to gofundme

You can go to Paypal

if you would like to help these horses.

->You can donate via check at: (PLEASE NOTE NEW PO BOX #)

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang,

PO Box # 233

Golconda, NV 89414

You can also donate via credit card by calling Palomino at 530-339-1458.

NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL – WE SAVE THEM ALL!

SAVING GD’S CRITTERS – FOUR FEET AT A TIME

Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, WIN Project – Rescue & Rehab

We are now part of the WIN Organization

WIN (WILD HORSES IN NEED) is a 501c3 IRS EIN 55-0882407_

If there are ever funds left over from the cost of the rescue itself, the monies are used to feed, vet, care for and provide shelter and proper fencing for the animals once they are saved.

Donate to Help

 

MH Hands At Side 04CC

MULE CROSSING: Achieving Balance and Harmony

0

By Meredith Hodges

Achieving balance and harmony with your equine requires more than just balancing and conditioning his body. As you begin finishing training on your equine, your awareness must now be shifted more toward your own body. Your equine should already be moving steadily forward in a longer frame and be basically obedient to your “aids” (your seat, legs and hands). The object in finishing training is to build the muscles in your own body so that your aids become more clearly defined and effective. This involves the shedding of old habits and the building of new ones. This takes a lot of time and should not be approached with impatience. There are no shortcuts!

In order to stabilize your hands and upper body, you need to establish a firm base in your seat and legs. Ideally, you should be able to drop an imaginary plumb line from your shoulder through your hips, through your heels and to the ground. To maintain this plumb line, you must work to make the joints and muscles in your body more supple and flexible through correct use, so that this line becomes your automatic posture.

As you ride your equine through walking exercises, try to stay soft, relaxed and following forward in your inner thighs and seat bones. Get the sensation that your legs are cut off at the knees and let your seat bones walk along with your animal—lightly, and in rhythm with him. If he slows down, just bend your knees and nudge him alternately with your legs below your knees, while keeping your seat and upper legs stable and moving forward. While your legs are still, they should rest gently on his sides in a “hug.” Do not push forward in your seat, but allow him to carry you forward. When collecting the walk on the short side, just bend both knees at the same time, nudging your equine simultaneously on both sides, while you squeeze the reins at the same time.

In order to help you stay over the middle of your animal’s back on the large circle, keep your eyes up and ahead, shift your weight slightly to the outside stirrup, and “feel the movement.” Bend your knee and set your inside leg snugly against your equine at his girth.  As you do this, be sure that your outside leg (the leg on the outside of the arc) stays in close contact with his body, well behind the girth. He will begin to bend his body through contact with your legs in this position. Your inside leg (the leg on the inside of the arc) will support the bend and help to keep him upright, and the outside leg will drive him forward through the arc of the turn, or circle. On straight lines, keep your legs even, slightly behind the girth and look straight ahead. To keep his shoulders from “dropping” while executing a turn, look up and a little to the outside of the circle. This will bring your inside seat bone slightly forward and your outside seat bone slightly back, allowing your legs to easily be in the correct position for the circle. Your weight should be shifted to the outside leg. This is particularly helpful during canter transitions.

Most of us feel that we do not balance on our reins as much as we actually do. If there is any balancing on the reins at all by the rider, your equine will be unable to achieve proper hindquarter engagement and ultimate self-carriage. Here is a simple exercise you can do to help shift the weight from your hands and upper body to your seat and legs. Begin by putting your equine on the rail at an active working walk. On the long side, drop your reins on his neck and feel your lower-body connection with him as you move along. In order to maintain your shoulder-to-hip plumb line, you will find that you need to tip your pelvis forward and stretch your abdominal muscles with each step. If your lower leg remains in the correct position, this will also stretch the thigh muscles on the front of your leg from hip to knee. There is also a slight side-to-side motion as your animal moves forward that will cause your seat bones to move independently and alternately forward. There is no doubt that you can probably do this fairly easily right from the start, but to maintain this rhythm and body position without thinking about it takes time and repetition.

When you are fairly comfortable at the walk, you can add some variation at the trot. Begin with the posting trot on the rail. Always post down in your seat to meet the equine’s front leg that comes back and underneath your outside leg. Post upwards as the equine’s front leg goes forward. Once your equine’s hindquarters are adequately engaged, you will begin to feel his hind legs coming under your seat. However, when starting out, it is easier to learn to post using a visual of the front legs, and rely on the physical sensation of the hind legs coming under your seat later. When your mule is going along the rail in a fairly steady fashion, drop your reins on his neck and continue to post. As you post down the long side, remember to keep your upper body erect, your pelvis rocking forward from your seat, your knees bent such that your legs are gently hugging the barrel of your equine, and your arms raised and straight out in front of you, parallel to your shoulders.

If your animal drifts away from the rail, you will need to post with a little more weight in your outside stirrup. As you go around the corners, be sure to turn your eyes a little to the outside of the circle to help your positioning. As you approach the short side of the arena, bring your arms backwards and straight out from your shoulders in a “T” formation, while keeping your upper body erect. As you go through the corners, just rotate your arms and upper body slightly toward the outside of your circle. When you come to the next long sides, bring your arms, once again, in front and parallel to your shoulders and repeat the exercise.

Notice the different pressure on your seat bones as you change your arm position. The forward arms will somewhat lighten your seat, while your arms to the side tend to exert a little more pressure. Consequently, you can send your animal more forward by using your seat as you go down the long sides, shortening that stride with a little added pressure from the seat bones on the short sides. When you wish to halt, put your arms behind you at the small of your back to support an erect upper body, and let your weight drop down through your seat bones and legs. Also, remember to use your verbal commands often in the beginning to clarify your aids (effect of the seat, legs and hands) to your equine. If your equine doesn’t stop, just reach down and give a gentle squeeze/release on the reins until he stops, but be sure to remain relaxed and continue to drop your weight into your seat and legs. Keep your inner thighs relaxed and flexible. Do NOT squeeze! Think DOWN through your legs on both sides. Before long, he will begin to make the connection between the weight of your seat and your command to “Whoa,” and your seat will take precedence over your reins.

When you and your equine have become adept at the walk and the trot, you can add the canter. At the canter, however, keep your arms out to the side and rotate them in small circles in rhythm with the canter. Be sure to sit back and allow only your pelvis, seat and thighs to stretch forward with the canter stride. Keep your upper body erect and your lower legs stable in the gentle “hugging” position. Once your equine has learned to differentiate seat and leg aids during each gait and throughout all transitions on the large circle, you can begin to work on directional changes through cones.

As you practice these exercises, you will soon discover how even the slightest shift of balance can affect your animal’s performance. By riding without your reins and making the necessary adjustments in your body, you will begin to condition your own muscles to work in harmony with those of your equine. As your muscles get stronger and more responsive, you will cultivate more harmony and balance with your animal. As you learn to ride more “by the seat of your pants,” you will encounter less resistance in your equine, as most resistance is initiated by tension in the seat and legs and by “bad hands,” an ineffective and uncommunicative dragging on the reins. Your hands should remain quiet and supportive in contact with the bit. Keeping your legs close to the sides of your equine’s body in a sort of hug will clarify the “track” he is to follow (much in the same way a train is confined to its tracks). As you learn to vary the pressure in your seat accordingly, so will you encounter less resistance in your animal through his back, and the stability in your lower legs will give him a clearer path to follow between your aids.

To learn more about Meredith Hodges and her comprehensive all-breed equine training program, visit LuckyThreeRanch.com or call 1-800-816-7566. Check out her children’s website at JasperTheMule.com. Also, find Meredith on FacebookYouTube and Twitter.

© 1992, 2016, 2017, 2021 Lucky Three Ranch, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

Page 2 of 2«12